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Posts Tagged ‘beans’

Edamame?

February 24th, 2014

edamameWhat is it? Have you tried it? What do you think of it?

These are some of the questions I got when I first made edamame for my family. I answered their questions, hoping that they would like this new food. Edamame is green soybeans – it is harvested before the beans harden. I have tried it and I do like it.  It turns out that my family likes it too… a lot.

Edamame is a vegetable that is typically found in the frozen foods section at grocery stores around here. I recently bought two 12 ounce bags for $5 (or $2.50 each). This is a little more than I usually spend on frozen vegetables, but there are some added nutritional benefits to eating edamame along with other vegetables. It is a good source of protein, fiber, some B vitamins, iron, and magnesium. This makes it a good partner for vegetables that are good sources of vitamin C, such as peppers, and vitamin A, such as carrots or winter squash.

Edamame can be used in many ways. I have served it as a side dish with a little salt and pepper. It can also be added to any dish you add frozen vegetables to such as soups, stir-fries, or casseroles. I have added it to my children’s favorite, tuna and noodles.  A small amount (1/2 to 1 cup) of thawed edamame could be added to any of these SpendSmart.EatSmart recipes to boost the nutrition:

Try some edamame and let us know what you think of it.

Justine

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Quick Garbanzo Bean Soup

December 24th, 2012

I make lots of soup in the winter.  It’s easy to do, lasts for several meals, and I can freeze small containers of it to take to work for lunch.  Most of the soup I make is broth or vegetable-based without lots of cream or cheese so it is low in calories.

This quick soup is made from garbanzo beans, which are also called chickpeas.  All my adult life I have avoided garbanzo beans because I thought they were too starchy but now I like them.  Maybe adult tastes change just like kids. Like all legumes these beans are high in protein and fiber and low in fat.

There are two features of this recipe that make it a winner.  First, it uses only one pan, and second, it calls for ingredients I keep in stock, except for the zucchini.

Since I don’t want to struggle with the winter weather and fortunate enough to have power, I think I will make some for lunch.  Instead of the zucchini I think I will add some frozen peas.

Quick Garbanzo Bean Soup

Serves: 8 | Serving Size: 1¼ cups | Per Serving: $.51

Ingredients:

  • ½ onion (about ½ cup)
  • 3 garlic cloves or ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 can (14.5 ounce) low sodium vegetable or chicken broth
  • 1 can (14.5 ounce) diced tomatoes
  • 2½ cups water
  • 1 can (15.5 ounce) low sodium garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed
  • ¾ cup sliced carrots (about 12-15 baby carrots)
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup whole-wheat pasta (rotini, shells, etc.)
  • 1 small zucchini, sliced (about 1-2 cups sliced)

Directions:

  1. Wash, peel, and chop onion. Peel and mince garlic cloves.
  2. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion and garlic, and cook over medium low heat for 5 minutes.
  3. Add broth, tomatoes, and water to saucepan. Stir in garbanzo beans, carrots, and seasonings.
  4. Cook on medium high heat about 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in pasta and zucchini. Reduce heat to medium low.
  6. Simmer about 10 minutes or until the pasta is tender.
  7. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

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Mediterranean Diet

June 11th, 2012

The last couple of weeks I have been studying the Mediterranean diet in Crete.  This diet, which is named for the traditional cooking style of countries bordering the Mediterranean sea, is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease, and higher life expectancy.  The locals brag that almost everyone in Crete has a relative that is over 100 years old  (it seems like the older I get, the more important life expectancy is to me!).

Below are some observations from my days in Crete:

  • I want to incorporate more vegetables in different ways into my diet. Especially recipes with the beets, zucchini, and eggplant we have growing in our garden.
  • Breakfast in Crete was usually plain yogurt that you could spoon a little honey or jam (which they called spoon sweets) over, whole wheat bread, cheese, and hard boiled eggs.  My yogurt and fruit breakfast is pretty similar.
  • Seafood has heart –healthy omega 3 fatty acids. We had snails several times in Crete plus sardines and other seafood.  I do not think fresh snails will be on my weekly menu, but some kind of seafood will be.  This summer will be a great time to experiment with grilled fish.
  • We had many vegetarian meals built around beans, whole grains, and vegetables with some great spices.  I am growing some oregano, basil, and mint on my deck that should add great flavor to my new recipes.
  • The focus of the Mediterranean diet is not on limiting total fat, but rather to discourage saturated fat and hydrogenated fat. I brought two bottles of olive oil home.  I probably will never use as much olive oil in recipes as the Greek cooks did, but I will use it more liberally than I have.   I will probably be more willing to drizzle oil over fresh tomatoes and cucumbers to make a simple salad.   I am also looking for great tasting olives.
  • Bread is eaten plain or dipped in olive oil, not eaten with butter or margarine which have saturated fats or trans fats.  Most of the bread is whole grain.  I will try my bread with olive oil.
  • Dessert in Crete is usually fruit or yogurt drizzled with honey.
  • Exercise is just part of living in Crete.   There are fewer cars, the roads are narrow and the terrain hilly.  Walking and bicycles seemed to be the norm for travel in the villages, with travel by bus or metro in the city, which means treks to and from the bus stops.  I need to work on incorporating more exercise into my daily routine…like a walk at lunch, parking at the far end of the parking lot, etc.

If you would like to learn more about the Mediterranean Diet check out, Oldways, Health Through Heritage.

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Cheesy Chicken Enchilada Bake

April 9th, 2012

Our featured recipe this month is Cheesy Chicken Enchilada Bake.  It is a very easy recipe that costs about $.80 a serving. You can use any combination of 4 cups of meat and beans that you have.  The recipe also calls for salsa. I use medium, but if you want a little more heat you could use a spicier salsa, add a hot pepper, or add a little hot sauce. Be sure you save a little of the enchilada filling to spread on top of the enchiladas.

When I make this dish, I put the enchiladas in two baking pans. I cook one and I freeze one. Then all you have to do is add fruit and milk. The frozen enchiladas will take about 30 minutes at 350⁰ F to thaw and heat through.

Chicken Safety Tip: Washing raw poultry before cooking it is not recommended. Bacteria in raw meat and poultry juices can be spread to other foods, utensils, and surfaces. This is called cross-contamination. Rinsing or soaking chicken does not destroy bacteria. Any bacteria that might be present on fresh chicken are destroyed only by cooking. Also, make sure you wash the cutting board and knife right after you use them. 

Cheesy Chicken Enchilada Bake

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast (about 2 cups)
  • ½ cup water
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 can (15-ounce) low sodium black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 cup frozen corn
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 8 whole wheat tortillas
  • Cooking spray
  • ½ cup 2%-fat shredded cheddar cheese

 Directions:

  1. Cut chicken breast into 4-5 chunks. Simmer in a large saucepan with water and chili powder. Cook until internal temperature is 165° F (about 10 minutes).
  2. Remove chicken from pan. Cut or shred into small chunks and return to pan. Add beans, corn, and salsa to saucepan. Cook until hot, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. Spread 1/2 cup of chicken mixture down the center of each tortilla. Roll up and place seam-side down in greased 9×13 pan.
  4. Spread any leftover chicken mixture over the top of the enchiladas.
  5. Bake at 375o F for 12-15 minutes.
  6. Sprinkle cheese on top of the enchiladas during the last 5 minutes of cooking.
  7. Serve immediately.

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Meatless Meals – What about beans?

March 19th, 2012

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about meatless meals on our Facebook page.  Choosing to go meatless for a meal or for an entire day is one way to save a little money on your grocery bill.  This can be easy at breakfast and lunch, but tends to be a little more difficult at supper time.  Even with a husband and a son who like to have meat with their meals, our family enjoys a meatless supper together once or twice each week.

Unfortunately, my post focused only on eggs and nuts as a good source of protein when choosing to go meatless.  My family and I love beans as a meatless meal.  There are some great bean recipes on the Spend Smart Eat Smart website; each recipe has helpful tips on preparing beans.  One of our favorites is Cowboy Caviar.  My son likes to eat it plain, but my husband and I spoon it into whole wheat tortillas and top it with some shredded cheese.  It also makes a good topping for lettuce salad or a dip for vegetables or tortilla chips.

Besides saving some money on food, meatless meals do have another benefit.  They help add variety into a weekly menu.  Eating a variety of foods from all the food groups (fruits, vegetables, dairy, protein, and grains) helps us make sure that we are getting all the nutrients we need primarily from food.

We also use soy to add protein to meals when we choose to go meatless, but that is a topic for another post…

Cowboy Caviar

Ingredients:

  • 1 15-ounce can kidney beans, drained
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained
  • 1 1/2 cups frozen corn, cooked
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with green chilies
  • 3 green onions, sliced
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

Instructions:

  1. Stir together kidney beans, black beans, corn, tomatoes, chilies, and onions in a large bowl.
  2. Add lime juice, oil, salt, and pepper; toss gently to combine.

Justine Hoover, MS, RD, LD

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It’s Cold Outside, Time for Soup

January 3rd, 2011

Soup is a great comfort food for winter meals, and so good for you too. Our featured recipe for January is  Mexican Chicken Soup. Making this soup takes less time than getting in the car and driving through your favorite takeout place. You don’t have to cook the chicken ahead of time. Just place raw boneless chicken in the pot with the other ingredients. After cooking for about 20 minutes, take the chicken out and shred it into bite-size pieces. Serve it with tortilla chips or bread, apple/orange slices and you have a meal with something from each food group plus plenty of fiber. For extra instruction, check out the preparation video under the recipe instructions.

This recipe would be super economical if you made your own chicken broth and cooked dry beans instead of buying them canned; click on the hot links above to see the directions.  Another advantage of doing it yourself is that you can control the amount of sodium.
If this soup scores points with your family, check out the other soup recipes in the Cook section of the SpendSmart.EatSmart web page.  All our recipes are healthy, low-cost and easy.

Mexican Chicken Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 (15-ounce) cans diced tomatoes (Mexican-style)
  • 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups frozen corn or 1 15-ounce can corn, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can sodium-reduced chicken broth or 2 cups Homemade Chicken Broth
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin (optional)
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast

Instructions

  1. Add tomatoes, beans, corn, broth, garlic, chili powder, cumin (if desired), and pepper in large saucepan.
  2. Remove and discard any visible fat from chicken. Cut chicken into large chunks and add to the saucepan. Heat to boiling, reduce heat and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until chicken is tender.
  3. Remove the chicken and place on a plate; use forks to shred the chicken. Return the shredded chicken to soup.
  4. Serve with choice of garnishes, such as baked tortilla chips.

-pointers from Peggy

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It’s fall and soup’s on

October 4th, 2010

This month’s featured recipe, 3-Can Chili,  is one of my “Go-To” recipes. You know what I mean—the ones that you know by heart, make often, and everyone likes. Plus, you can have this one on the table in about 20 minutes. To lower the cost, I buy canned tomatoes, canned beans, and frozen corn when they are on sale. I use my price book so I know a good price and try never to buy full price.

The variations for 3-Bean Chili are endless. You can vary the types of canned beans you use, or cook dry beans, rehydrating them for an inexpensive meal. You can use fresh tomatoes which would lower the sodium; add fresh chili peppers or canned Mexican-style tomatoes to increase the heat; use canned or frozen corn; add cooked and drained ground turkey or beef; etc.

I like to make a batch and freeze individual portions to take for lunch at work. Sometimes after it is heated, I add a tablespoon or two of shredded cheese, or plain yogurt. The soup, apple, and milk make a great lunch!

-pointers from Peggy

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