Innovation and Relationships

April 16th, 2015

Yesterday I participated in a national study of innovation in extension, and I have to say that I ended the day feeling less confident that I understand innovation, its role, and what supports it than I did before. Uh-oh.

It started with the first question I was asked: “How do you define innovation in extension?” I know. That sounds like an easy question until they follow it by asking you to give three examples. Where do you start?

I don’t know how your thought process goes, but how do you talk about innovation in extension in the first place? Do you mean an innovative program? Do you mean an innovation that we helped diffuse to the larger population? Do you mean an innovation in how extension is structured and delivered?

In some ways, answering this question is like being in a house of mirrors. Extension was essentially created as a targeted innovation diffusion structure. The role of extension was to provide the trusted adviser and create the social process through which innovations could spread. I think sometimes people misunderstand the role of extension and think we are just information dissemination, and if that’s the case, then there is good reason to worry with the Internet and other means for accessing information 24/7. People who think this way often believe that important innovations will spread quickly, now that we’ve got the Internet. Some do, such as innovations related to communication technologies and YouTube videos.

However, according to Atul Gawande there is a long list of vital innovations that don’t catch on just by sharing the information. The puzzle is, why? Gawande studied whether innovation diffusion was negatively impacted by economics, technical complexity, and other factors. What Gawande learned is that there is a pattern with stalled ideas. They attack problems that are big but, to most people, invisible; and making them work can be tedious and requires effort that may not yield its full impact until much later. In other words, they are “wicked problems” that have complex solutions and require changing social norms. Gawande notes that truly changing norms requires nearly one-on-one, on-site mentoring — which doesn’t sound like much of a solution. Gawande states, “It would require broad mobilization, substantial expense, and perhaps even the development of a new profession.” (Hmmm. Sounds like extension work.)

Gawande, who works in the medical field, continues: “Think about the creation of anesthesiology — it meant doubling the number of doctors in every operation, and we went ahead and did so. To reduce illiteracy, countries, starting with our own, built schools, trained professional teachers, and made education free and compulsory for all children. To improve farming, governments have sent hundreds of thousands of agriculture extension agents to visit farmers across America and every corner of the world and teach them up-to-date methods for increasing their crop yields. Such programs have been extraordinarily effective. They have cut the global illiteracy rate from one in three adults in 1970 to one in six today, and helped give us a Green Revolution that saved more than a billion people from starvation.”

Gawande then goes on to quote one of Iowa State’s own, Everett Rogers, the great scholar of how new ideas spread. Rogers wrote, “Diffusion is essentially a social process through which people talking to people spread an innovation.” Media can introduce an idea, but people look to other people they know and trust when they decide whether they will pursue that new idea. Extension — innovation and relationships. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress. Read Gawande’s article at http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/07/29/slow-ideas.

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This Is the Work

April 9th, 2015

Early in my career (OK, a really long time ago), I was a hall adviser at Iowa State University. I was responsible for providing support services to students, primarily 800 women who lived in Maple Hall. Our staff had all kinds of plans for programs we wanted to implement and activities to engage students in optimizing their development. Yep. We were a pretty idealistic bunch.

But when you bring 800 people together, things happen. Some of them get sick. Some have really tough break-ups with their boyfriends. Some get engaged. Some lose their parents. Some fail a class. Some get scholarships. Some make poor choices, like the ones who decided to rappel from the top of the hall.

One frustrating and long day, one of my staff said it would be nice if we didn’t have so many distractions so we could just get our work done. But here’s the thing: this is the work. That’s true in ISU Extension and Outreach too. We really are about the people and people change, people have emotions, people have unexpected things happen to them, people have lives. This is the reason Mike Kruzeniski, director of experience design at Twitter, says it is so important to make sure you are thinking about how you want to build your organization while you are designing whatever great things your organization builds.

Kruzeniski says “we all just want to focus on designing and making great things, but building the company is what will support you to do the work you aspire to do … and it takes a long time. When company stuff gets complicated, it’s easy to complain, to point at the people you think are responsible, or to just quit. But it’s your job to help. Your role in a company isn’t to just be the designer of products; your role is to be a designer of that company, to help it become the company that has the ability to make the products you aspire to make. When you joined your company, you probably didn’t think you signed up to help build the company too, but you did. By helping to make your company a better place to work, you make it a better place to design and build things.”

Kruzeniski also says “don’t just think about that one product you need to design in the next three, six, or 12 months. Consider the skills, relationships, and tools that you and your company will need for the next two, five, seven, or 10 years and start working on them now. Don’t just measure yourself by the output of your very next project; Measure yourself by how you’re improving quality over the course of your next 10 projects. Measure yourself by the quality of the projects of your peers. When you see problems, go tackle them, even if nobody told you to. Put it on yourself to make it better, so that your current and future colleagues won’t have to deal with that same problem. Your job is to be the shoulders that the next generation of designers  —  and perhaps your future self  —  at your company will stand on.”

At ISU Extension and Outreach, we all have very busy days conducting needs assessments, developing programs, managing finances, delivering educational programs, managing people, collaborating with key partners — and designing the future Extension and Outreach. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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Stuff We Need to Know

April 2nd, 2015

In ISU Extension and Outreach, we must be in front of transformation, not waiting to react to it. This means realizing there is stuff we need to know.

1. We must know our state and what’s happening in it.
2. We must know our university and its strengths.
3. We must know our people and what they care about.

The lifelong partnerships we build, the learning opportunities we provide, and the experiences we deliver have one over-arching goal – to improve the quality of life in Iowa. We’ve been working toward this goal for some time now. That’s why we had our leadership summit. That’s why we agreed on our fundamental principles. That’s why we started examining our organizational culture.

We’re addressing Iowa’s changing demographics. We’re working to widen our circle of service with urban audiences and increase the diversity of our workforce, partners, and participants. We’re adapting to our new reality, as we deal with complex problems and broaden the role of ISU Extension and Outreach, and as we manage the role technology plays.

Through our land-grant mission we make good on our shared commitment to Iowa, to our people, and to our future. Our land-grant mission compels us to provide high-quality, research-based education. Equally important, our mission also should drive us to deliver the most remarkable experiences that we possibly can. Land-grant universities are called “people’s colleges” for a reason. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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Forward-Thinking People

March 26th, 2015

When it comes to people, Iowa is a small state. With a population of 3 million, we’re just slightly bigger than Chicago. But more than 30 million acres of the world’s best agricultural land lies between the two rivers that make up our state’s borders. On it, we produce about 19 percent of the nation’s corn supply and 15 percent of the soybeans. In addition, Iowa produces nearly 30 percent of the pork, 22 percent of the eggs, and 2 percent of the milk: Talk about a complete breakfast! Not to be outdone, our state also produces 10 percent of the nation’s cattle, 3 percent of the turkeys, and a staggering array of yeast, enzymes, sweeteners, flavors, proteins, fibers, gelatins, and binders critical to the world’s food industry. And did I mention this? We produce about 25 percent of the nation’s ethanol.

We also produce special people. Iowa has been known for people who are ahead of their time, bolstered by common sense and determined to make life better for others. Have you ever heard of Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, or George Washington Carver? How about John Atanasoff, Black Hawk, or Carrie Chapman Catt? And then there’s Arthur Collins, of electronics fame; Jesse Field Shambaugh, the mother of 4-H; and Alexander Clark, who was tireless in his efforts to improve the lives of African Americans. And that’s only the short list, here are a few more.

Iowa is the state whose people first accepted the terms of the Land Grant Act, to create access to education for the common people; the state whose farmers engaged with their land-grant university to begin extension work. Iowa was home to American Indians who utilized domesticated plants more than 3,000 years ago, leading to flourishing settlements. This state provided a disproportionate number of our young men to fight in the Civil War and support President Lincoln. When Saigon fell in 1975 and pleas went out to U.S. governors to provide a home for the Tai Dam families and preserve their culture, it was Iowa’s governor who answered.

Iowa always has been home to a blend of immigrants: French, Norwegians, Swedes, Dutch, Germans, Irish, English, Scots, the Sac and Fox who returned to Iowa, Italians, Czech and Croatians, Mexicans, African Americans, Tai Dam, Vietnamese, Laotians, and more. These are Iowa’s people.

People don’t come to Iowa or stay in Iowa because we have mountains (with apologies to our Loess Hills region) or seaside resorts (not even in Sabula, Iowa’s only island city). People come to Iowa for agriculture, for family, for community, for a better quality of life. Iowa is for people who want to make a difference. In ISU Extension and Outreach we amplify this legacy with our focus on signature issues: feeding people, keeping them healthy, helping communities prosper and thrive, and turning the world over to the next generation better than we found it.  Our work isn’t just about creating access to education. Our work is about people – forward-thinking people. We have an obligation to the forward-thinking people who came before us, and those who will follow us, to focus on what matters most. It’s all about people. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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Proud of Our People

March 12th, 2015

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Well.  WOW.  We had our 2015 ISU Extension and Outreach Annual Conference this week and I’m still pumped! Thank you to the 480 who attended and filled Benton Auditorium.  Our theme was “it’s all about people,” and was it ever! From the opening drumming of the Iowa State Groove to Jim Harken and Julie Hlas’ closing thank you notes, being together for this conference felt like coming home to family. With lots of coffee, food, and time to visit, we could catch up with one another. (Thanks to Lake Laverne swans Lance and Lainey for taking over Twitter duty and scoring our highest number of impressions ever.) We learned more about what our other family members were doing all over the state and we had the opportunity to recognize them for their great work (and hold a hissing cockroach).

As Provost Wickert reminded us, Iowa was the first state to accept the provisions of the Morrill Act to establish a land-grant university. Iowa State was the first in the nation to engage citizens and begin Extension and Outreach. Today we carry on the legacy of a forward-thinking people, because Extension and Outreach is all about people: the Iowans we serve, our partners and volunteers, and our faculty and staff throughout the state. I appreciate the great work you all do for the people of Iowa. I am regularly impressed by your dedication and creativity, and your commitment to turning the world over to the next generation better than we found it.

It really is as simple as the extension professional’s creed starts: I believe in people and their hopes, their aspirations, and their faith; in their right to make their own plans and arrive at their own decisions; in their ability and power to enlarge their lives and plan for the happiness of those they love. You are rising to our unique legacy, but you don’t have to take my word for it: Watch this video message from our boots on the ground throughout the state.

We all can be proud to be Iowans. Proud to be Cyclones. Proud to be part of ISU Extension and Outreach and the Land-Grant System. When each of us joined Extension and Outreach, whether that was 40 years ago (We’re talking about you, Donna Donald!) or just this week (Hey there, Ryan Breuer and Renae Kroneman!), we began a lifelong partnership with the people of Iowa.  And, we also began the #BestJobEver. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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Defining and Designing Experience

February 26th, 2015

We often say we want people to not only gain information from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, but also have an“experience.” When someone makes this comment in a meeting, we all nod our heads in agreement. As I was driving back from eastern Iowa last week, I did what I often do, and started wondering about the stuff we all nod our heads about.

What do we mean when we say we want people to have an experience? What kind? Who gets to have it?  Who is defining the experience? Do we all mean the same thing when we say experience? I looked it up, and there’s a lot of room for interpretation. (See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/experience for starters.) So I did a little reading. Brian Solis, an expert in branding, says we are in a new era of marketing and service, “in which your brand is defined by those who experience it.” Solis argues that no one engages with a company or organization hoping for ordinary. Everyone is seeking a remarkable experience.

I think the future of our organization lies in shared experiences. However, do we have a responsibility to plan those experiences, or is whatever our clients experience by default good enough? We have to consider what these experiences involve, because our clients will tell their friends not only about what they learn, but also about what they actually experience. Do their experiences align with expectations of the ISU Extension and Outreach brand or are there gaps? How do we create and deliver meaningful and shareable experiences to ensure that more Iowans engage with us? What are we asking people to align with if we haven’t defined the experience? What do we want them to be part of?

When Iowans are having an experience with Extension and Outreach, it should be clear to them that they are engaging with Iowa State University. There should be no question that they are receiving research-based education. They should readily understand that we are their lifelong partner as they seek personal and professional satisfaction and success for their communities.  We provide education and deliver experiences; both are equally important. We need to define and design the experiences with as much thought and effort as we define and design the education so Iowans will engage with ISU Extension and Outreach as lifelong partners. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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More Than a Cup of Joe

February 5th, 2015

This week, I had an interesting conversation with my children about a cup of coffee. We had agreed to meet for coffee and then had quite a discussion about where we wanted to go. Each of us suggested several places, and as we argued their merits, I realized something bigger was afoot and relevant to those of us in Extension and Outreach.

My middle son – ever the practical one – was all about who had the most reasonable price with minimum fuss. My older son cited his choice for its convenience, ample parking, and short lines. My daughter’s choice, however, at first was met with derision. She suggested her choice because she “felt comfortable” sitting there. “It’s about coffee,” son 2 retorted, and as she dug in, I realized that no, it wasn’t. As we all gathered at the coffee shop she had advocated, it was clear to me that some things become meaningful and create value in our lives beyond their utility or convenience. It’s worth the extra effort to seek them out, because of how we feel about them or what we believe about the experience.

Sometimes people just want a convenient cup of joe, but sometimes they want more. If we provide them with an exceptional experience, they’ll come back again and tell their friends. Our goal should be to create both meaning and value, as well as utility and convenience. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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Our First Name

January 29th, 2015

A lot of people know me by just my first name – family, friends, and colleagues at many levels. I’m often the only Cathann they know. The name’s a bit unusual. I was the first girl born in my father’s family after nearly two generations of boys. My parents put it together to honor Catherine and Annie, two family matriarchs whom, let’s face it, no one wanted to tick off.

I’ve had times when it was inconvenient or difficult to have such a name, such as the many times I’ve had to help people pronounce or spell it: No, it’s not Caitlin, Cathleen, Chatham, or Calhoun. Over time, I’ve discovered that there are two main ways to pronounce it (CATH-ann or ca-THANN). When I was younger, I resented that I could never find a personalized pen, necklace, or bike tag with my name emblazoned on it. It also could be cumbersome. I recall quite vividly that it took me a long time to get even one “Cathann Arceneaux” written during penmanship class in elementary school, while “Joe Fry” sitting next to me whipped through about ten repetitions of his name. And yes, it has often been shortened to “Cathy” or “Annie” or “Cat” or “Hanna.”

However, mostly I’ve loved my name, because of what it represents and because our names say a lot about who we are.

I’ve noticed the same thing with Extension and Outreach. Some people aren’t sure what to call us, given our 100 county offices, our program areas, and our many campus units and departments. It can be cumbersome to manage all the parts of our names.  We have a multitude of nicknames. However, one person who is sure is Jeff Johnson, president and CEO of the Iowa State University Alumni Association. According to Jeff, whatever your place in this organization, “Iowa State University is your first name.”

“Cardinal and gold aren’t everybody’s colors, but they’re our colors. If it wasn’t for Iowa State University, Extension and Outreach wouldn’t exist – not the other way around,” Jeff said. He isn’t asking us to become Iowa State cheerleaders. Rather, we’re partners, working together in the business of higher education.

We are Iowa State University Extension and Outreach whether we identify with a campus unit, a college department, or a county office or a specific program anywhere in the state. We are a capacity-building unit of Iowa State, providing access to education, developing diverse and meaningful partnerships, and creating significant impact throughout our state. We even have the personalized pens. It’s a first name we all can be proud of because of what it represents. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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1,000 Strawberry Points

January 22nd, 2015

StrawberryPoint200Icons can be widely known symbols, like the little bird on my cell phone that helps me find my Twitter account. Other icons are objects of devotion, as evidenced by teenage girls swooning over the boy band One Direction. And there’s a wide range between these two extremes. In any case, icons offer insights into what we find important. They mean something to us.

If you’ve ever been to Strawberry Point, Iowa, you know there’s just something iconic about that great big strawberry that’s high in the sky above downtown. That giant berry represents a distinct identity and pride of place in a one-of-a-kind community. That’s why we used it in our 2014 annual report to help illustrate how many people ISU Extension and Outreach serves. Last year more than 1 million people directly benefited from our programs. That’s one thousand Strawberry Points.

There are other Iowa icons in our annual report as well – the High Trestle Trail, the American Gothic house, and “Main Street,” to name a few. They’re a shortcut to make our point: We are everywhere for Iowans. Iowa State educates more Iowa students than any other university, and ISU Extension and Outreach educates more Iowans. Having said that, it’s awfully hard to boil our work down to numbers or a brief report, because we all know that it’s more than numbers and more than Web clicks. It’s about children and their families, businesses and farmers, teachers, manufacturers, local leaders, caregivers, and legislators. The list goes on and on, because our work is about building capacity and mostly, it’s about people and our institution’s lifelong partnership with them. We know Iowa’s people and places, and we look forward to continuing to serve our fellow Iowans. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. Review our 2014 annual report. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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That Which Must Not Be Named

January 8th, 2015

Happy New Year!

There has been a lot of chatter in social media about the coming extinction of Cooperative Extension. (What a great opener to follow my new year wishes, huh?)  It’s not the result of people contemplating what lies ahead in a new year. It’s not because in 2014 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act. This kind of talk tends to come up now and again as people come to grips with change. How much longer will people seek out extension when they can be online 24/7? How will we meet the challenges of the future?  What will we need to do differently?  I’m glad to see this being discussed.

One of the people taking about it is Jim Langcuster (the “ExtensionGuy” on Twitter), a retired news and public affairs specialist with the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. He compares extension to a dinosaur and says that to avoid extinction, extension must become a “bona fide digital delivery system” with extension educators as technical professionals. (Read his blog post.)

We’d be fools not to pay attention to this challenge. However, I don’t think extension is facing a precipice where we must go completely digital or go home. True, people want easier access to information – and the research in library science points that out more and more. But they also want an “experience,” which is hard to have with only a digital presence. We need to enhance our digital access while focusing the experience of extension for our constituents. A great example of that was a recent Farm Bill meeting I attended in Blairstown. Ryan Drollette did a great job of combining a face-to-face experience, which allowed him to tailor the pace and content, with the online resources including our Ag Decision Maker.

We need to talk about these challenges and how we do our work. If for no other reason than it’s good to do what my kids and friends call “naming our Voldemorts.” In the Harry Potter movies, the bad guy gains power through fear, even the fear of saying his name. We all have Voldemorts, fears we are too nervous to even name, and these fears prevent us from really exploring how we more fully address and resolve them. However, we diminish their fear-inducing power when we can name them. Let’s name this Voldemort and accept the challenges that change brings by focusing on how we provide access to education and develop meaningful lifelong partnerships to create significant impact for Iowans. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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