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Posts Tagged ‘Extension’

The Real Golden Age

July 10th, 2014

If you’ve been around Extension and Outreach for any amount of time, you’ve likely heard someone refer to the past as if it were the “Golden Age of Extension.”   I know ever since I was a 4-H Educator in Benton and Tama counties, I’ve had this impression that once upon a time extension was characterized by peace, harmony, stability, and prosperity. During that time, we assume working in extension was easy and wonderful, with plenty of resources, and the unflagging appreciation of the public. But when was that, exactly? Was it a hundred years ago as extension began? When early extension pioneers made their rounds by horse and buggy with little value placed on a university which few citizens understood? Given the struggles those educators had just communicating, not to mention encouraging adoption of research-based techniques – I wonder. Maybe it was in the 1930s — the era of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression? Maybe not. How about the 1940s and 1950s — after all, isn’t that when Norman Rockwell painted that iconic painting of the County Agent? Oh, wait — with the recovery following World War II? Hmmmm.

I do believe there is a golden age of Extension — it is before us, right now. At no other time have we had the resources and technology at our disposal, the ease of communication and networking, or the recognition of the importance of access to the educational resources of our university.

Think about it: Our faculty and staff are about 1,000 strong, working with families and youth, farmers and agribusiness professionals, and businesses and communities all across the state. Each year nearly 1 million people directly benefit from our educational programs. We’re communicating with each other, our partners, and our clients face-to-face, as well as using computers, iPads, and smart phones. We can videoconference, teleconference, or still meet for coffee at the Ivy Bake Shoppe. Last year Iowans connected virtually with us through more than 1.5 million website visits and downloads of educational materials and courses. Can you imagine how our early educators would marvel at our technology and envy the resources we have in our program portfolio?

We must continue to build on this work, to widen the circle of our reach throughout the state, to live up to the legacy and the dreams of those extension educators who preceded us. Every dollar that Iowans invest in Extension and Outreach pays back dividends — when entrepreneurs start businesses, families make healthy choices, youth become leaders for the future, and communities become better places to live. We are lucky enough to be stewards of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach when a golden age is upon us. See you there.

– Cathann

change, Communication, technology , , ,

The Secret Sauce

June 26th, 2014

Kelsy Reynaga is a junior at Iowa State, recently selected to be a national Project YES! (Youth Extension Service) Intern, a program I helped start at the Department of Defense. While I’m proud of being there at its beginning, I’m even prouder that the talented educators I turned it over to have created an educational experience that greatly benefits the interns, the military families, and extension. Kelsy wrote me recently about starting this new internship and had a number of tough questions she wanted to ask, most without easy answers. Since Kelsy will likely expect some wisdom when we meet, I’ve spent a fair amount of time reflecting on her questions.

What drives me? As I begin my fourth year as vice president for Extension and Outreach at Iowa State University, I find our work of creating access to education to be incredibly meaningful. I feel an obligation to extension’s early educational pioneers to rise to their level and create educational opportunities and solutions for the future. I am regularly delighted by the dedication, creativity, and talent of the people I get to work with, and I want to leave things better than I found them.

Is this the path I envisioned for my future? Um. No. I’m not good enough at predicting the future, or understanding what opportunities might come up. Instead, I’ve learned to be ready and open and willing to leap.

So, is it possible to accomplish everything you want to do? Not alone. Not in a direct line. Not in the way you thought it would happen. Not as quickly as you might hope. Accomplishing things really depends on understanding the fundamental conditions that support accomplishment.  At the most basic level, there are only a few things one needs for accomplishment to thrive: Vision. Resources. An action plan. But the real secret sauce to getting things done is nurturing talented colleagues, making it easier for them to do their work, and recognizing and rewarding their efforts. In other words, our ability to strengthen Extension and Outreach lies in improving the conditions that shape our organizational culture.

As I thought about what to say to Kelsy, I realized I don’t really think so much about “accomplishing stuff” anymore — instead, I think about trying to create the conditions for good things to happen. See you there.

– Cathann

Mission, vision , , , ,

Coping with Water

June 19th, 2014

Most of us don’t like change – it takes us away from the familiar, makes us learn something new, makes us think.  I did a quick search, and there are countless books, blogs, websites and magazines with strategies and methods for coping with change, both personally and professionally, at home and in the workplace. We tend to think it’s a new thing — perhaps change came along with the Internet because surely before then, not much changed, right?

Extension was created on the concept of change. Those early educators and researchers weren’t teaching citizens about practices everyone already knew or were comfortable with, but new ideas, different techniques, and innovative practices. Change is kind of our thing. Our early Extension professionals even understood how uncomfortable we adults can get with change, leading to the creation of 4-H, because, well … youth are apparently a bit more willing to be early adopters.  I think telling an Extension professional that they need to “cope” with change is like telling a fish to cope with water.

We make change into something that must be dealt with and adjusted to. And maybe that’s our problem. We give change a life of its own. We say change is hard and responding to change takes time and effort. But really, change simply “is” and we can’t really keep it from happening.

We will change now and then, as we deliver our fundamental programs, address signature issues, take on emerging program opportunities, and transition programs that can be spun off to a partner, sustained locally, or are no longer needed. We will change as we shape our organizational culture and move forward on our action steps from annual conference. But ISU Extension and Outreach always will put the land-grant resources to work, applying university research and evidence-based practices across the state. There are things that make it easier to rise to the example of our early Extension professionals, such as understanding that big picture of our work, having anchors such as our values, which provide stability, keeping our expectations realistic, and relying on each other.  See you there.

– Cathann

change , ,

Report Card Time

June 5th, 2014

Cathann and friends at ISU graduationSelfie taken at ISU Spring Commencement – President of the Senior Class Ben Zelle, Associate VP for Student Affairs Martino Harmon, Provost Jonathan Wickert, Dean of the Graduate College David Holger, Senior VP for Student Affairs Tom Hill, VPEO Cathann Kress, and Dean of Students Pamela Anthony.

I always enjoy graduation season. As usual, Iowa State’s commencement was a fine occasion of pomp and circumstance, as well as tweets and selfies and unfettered happiness as our students became graduates and alumni of our land-grant university. Hilton Coliseum was filled with young people in their caps and gowns, triumphantly walking across the stage and out into the world. (There were a few not-so-young people there, too, as this selfie attests.) Similar scenes have been playing out in high school auditoriums and gymnasiums throughout the state in recent weeks, with so many of our young people moving on to the next stage of their lives. But even the younger students, who may have a long way to go before their graduations, are filled with anticipation at this time of year as they await their report cards.

Report card time, for many of us, was a time of wonder, as in, I wonder what grade I’ll get in math class. Did that last English paper make the difference? Was that chemistry final good enough to land a passing grade for the semester?

We’ve all had our performance reviews so we know how well we did individually this past year. But how did we do as a group? What does Extension and Outreach’s report card look like? Let’s take a look at some of the things we said we’d do.

  • Update and finalize the ISU Extension and Outreach Strategic Plan: Done
  • Streamline ISU Extension and Outreach Administration into functional units responsible for key actions: Done
  • Develop and support systems to improve internal communications, coordination, and collaboration: Underway
  • Complete our business plan: Underway
  • Invest in meaningful partnerships: Underway
  • Refine a system to collectively identify emerging and current needs: Done, and sharing
  • Develop and support a structure to sustain professional development: Launching

We set these goals at our leadership summit, and we’ve made substantial progress in the last two and a half years. Yes, there’s more we can do. That’s why we began examining our organizational culture during our 2014 annual conference, so we can better align our behaviors with our values and vision. The conference report, with action steps based on our facilitated discussions and our post-conference evaluations, will be released next week.

We are a learning organization, with shared values and a collective history of making a difference for Iowans. Together we try new ideas and approaches, we get our report card, and we learn from our experiences. See you there.

– Cathann

Land-grant mission, Partnerships , , ,

Carrying the Best Parts Forward

April 25th, 2014

Becky BrayThis week’s message is from guest contributor Becky Bray, Scott County Extension Director.

Some people are still feeling the effects of the changes, uncertainty, and stress of the 2009 reorganization. Although we have moved on in many ways, there is still some feeling that the “old” Extension is gone and we don’t know what the new Extension really is. I’ve felt, and noticed in others, some negative feelings at times and it hasn’t set well with me. This is an organization that has been important — at times even crucial — in the lives of our clientele, and we want to continue to serve. How do we best do that with volunteers and staff who still feel unsettled and uncertain?

In my search for ideas, I found appreciative inquiry, which notes that all organizations have some good things going on and that we should focus on those good things. Rather than look for problems (and, therefore, find them), appreciative inquiry encourages organizations to find what they’ve done well and figure out how and why those things have been successful.

It occurs to me that in Extension and Outreach, we have written “success stories” for years. We have been told that they are used for communicating with legislators and stakeholders about our good work so they will continue to support our efforts. If we follow the ideas in appreciate inquiry, we would write those stories and share them with each other. We would learn what works and what we should feel good about in order to do even better.

Two of the assumptions made in appreciative inquiry resonate strongly with me: People have more confidence and comfort to journey to the future (the unknown) when they carry forward parts of the past (the known). And, if we carry parts of the past forward, it should be what is best about the past.

Moving past the 2009 reorganization was part of the discussions at our annual conference in March. People acknowledged some lingering negativity, but also expressed the need to get past those feelings to create a more positive organizational culture moving forward. Becky makes a strong case for this approach – appreciating what we’ve done well and understanding the reasons for our success. We also recognize there is much for us to be positive about, we are carrying the best parts forward.  See you there.

– Cathann

Attitude, change , ,

Key Influencers

April 3rd, 2014

County Office Professionals were in town this week. I always enjoy the opportunity to learn more about how things are really going out in the counties – and there’s no one better than this group of key influencers for finding out a thing or two. Here’s what we talked about, what I learned, and what I know.

  • This is a very important group of individuals.
  • They represent us. They are the first face, the first voice, the helping hand, the kind gesture, the gentle reminder, the history, the changing culture, the “get it done,” the good idea.
  • They are eager to learn. We introduced them to the brand new Hansen Agricultural Learning Center, we provided professional development key to their daily work, we encouraged, and we listened.
  • I reminded them that they are key influencers and the guardians of our educational mission. They have the opportunity to inspire people to live up to their talents and do the best work of their lives – work they never imagined they could do – and THEY have that same opportunity. I encouraged them to reflect, to care, and to be confident.

Our office professionals are working for ISU Extension and Outreach for the same reasons we all are. We all want to make life better, all across the state. Here’s something to consider: think about what even one day would be like in your professional lives without them. There; that says it all.

I hope our county office professionals – and all our office professionals – feel appreciated. I know I appreciate them. Whatever your role for ISU Extension and Outreach, I want you to remember that today– and every day that follows, for the rest of your life – each day is an opportunity for you to make the world better. See you there.

– Cathann

Mission, professional development , ,

The Pride of Iowa

March 27th, 2014

This has been a busy and exciting week, and not just because it’s ISU Extension and Outreach week. I’ve been in two capitols (in Washington, D.C., and Des Moines) attending two centennial celebrations (Norman Borlaug’s birthday and the Smith-Lever Act anniversary).

At the beginning of the week, I had the great honor of accompanying State 4-H Council members Megan Hughes and Michael Tupper and being part of Iowa State’s delegation to D.C. for the unveiling of the Norman Borlaug statue in Statuary Hall on what would have been his 100th birthday. It was a great day to be an Iowan, with many dignitaries, a lot of history, and a few speeches. It’s hard to pick a favorite moment, but I would like to highlight Rep. Tom Latham’s observation that while it was Borlaug’s research that was key to saving a billion people from hunger, it was also the ability to get that research to the people that led to the “green revolution.” In fact, Rep. Latham noted that Borlaug’s last words uttered after a colleague shared another discovery were, “Get it to the farmers.” Here at Iowa State, we understand the importance of connecting research and extension and the powerful impact when both efforts are strong. (Learn more about Norman Borlaug at http://www.normanborlaug.org/.)

Today, we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Smith-Lever Act, which formally established cooperative extension, with the reading of a bipartisan resolution in our own statehouse. Iowa State was the first to establish extension — in 1903, when Sioux County farmers and Iowa State University established the basis for agricultural cooperative extension work across the country. With this resolution, the Iowa Senate celebrates historical, current, and future Extension and Outreach work in Iowa. The resolution also honors extension council members, volunteers, the Iowa State University faculty and Extension and Outreach educators and staff throughout the state who dedicate careers to providing trusted education to help farmers, families, youth, businesses, and communities solve problems, develop skills, and build a better future. (Learn more about the national Smith-Lever celebration at http://www.extension100years.net/en/administration/about_us/chancellors_office/extension/celebration/.)

Our work received a standing ovation in the Iowa Senate chambers this morning as the senators unanimously voted to adopt the resolution. What a week to be a proud Iowan and proud Cyclone! Education and partnership really are the pride of Iowa. We look forward to the next 100 years of innovative research, which we will take to the people. See you there.

– Cathann

Land-grant mission, Partnerships , , , ,

C.J. and Smith-Lever

March 20th, 2014

C.J. Gauger and Cathann KressRecently I attended a birthday party — a 100th birthday party — for an Iowa icon, C.J. Gauger. As Iowa’s state 4-H leader from 1959-1979, C.J. was a visionary, guiding 4-H. He brought the boys’ and girls’ 4-H programs together and emphasized life skills development for all youth, rural or urban. He truly believed in listening to Iowa’s young people and involving them in shaping their 4-H program.

Another icon with a 100th birthday this year is the Smith-Lever Act, which established Cooperative Extension nationwide. For 100 years, the Smith-Lever Act has stimulated innovative research and vital educational programs for youth and adults. State-by-state, a network of educators extend university-based research and knowledge to the people, improving lives and shaping a nation.  Later in May, I’m taking a delegation from Iowa State to Washington, D.C., to a national convocation to celebrate this birthday too.

Birthday parties are fleeting – the balloons deflate and the leftover cake dries out as we pick up the crumpled gift wrap. But the reason for the celebration remains long after the party is over. In C.J.’s case, his legacy lives on through one of every five Iowa youth, who participates in our 4-H programs. And as for Smith-Lever, in Iowa alone, nearly a million people directly benefit from our educational programs every year. During Extension and Outreach Week, March 23-29 we’ll be celebrating our continuing mission to provide access to education through meaningful partnerships. It’s a great time to celebrate icons like C.J. and Smith-Lever, and to show our appreciation for our clients, colleagues, volunteers, community leaders, organizations, agencies and many other partners who support ISU Extension and Outreach work in Iowa. See you there.

– Cathann

Land-grant mission, Partnerships , , , ,

Packages, Pizza, and People

February 20th, 2014

Recently, my oldest son was reading an article to me about how Amazon plans to start offering deliveries via drone-like “octocopters.” While there are numerous issues for them to still work out – like negotiating bad weather, sufficient battery life, and the fact that most human beings may not be able to resist knocking stuff out of the sky – it could be reality at some time in the not too distant future. Domino’s Pizza also is contemplating such a delivery system. I find this quite interesting, mostly because there’s just nothing like having a delivery system that brings you something you want quickly and efficiently.

This reminded me of comments from colleagues who responded to my informal organizational survey last summer. Some of them focused on Extension and Outreach as a distribution system with procedures to facilitate and monitor the flow of information from the university to the public. Carrying out the metaphor, the system has distribution centers linked to local franchises, but needs a host of delivery people to move the produce. One colleague talked about the importance of delivery people in this system:

In most cases you know them well and they are trusted faces. They go everywhere, are admitted in places where others aren’t invited, and are present in the daily lives of the whole of society. All of this is, of course, secondary to their primary role of deliverers of service. Who doesn’t anxiously wait for the arrival of that package ordered online or isn’t pleasantly surprised by a card in the mail? The pizza guy is a welcome and anticipated visitor at my house, because he brings us something valuable, something that we desire. … Our organization should aspire to be an efficient and effective delivery system represented by the best, friendliest, and most trusted delivery people around. … We should always be timely, courteous, and deliver only the highest quality product.

It begs the question: What do our constituents want delivered? To that end, we just completed our statewide needs assessment, and the major “Aha” for me was recognizing where the identified needs might fit in our overall program development process. While we must be responsive to our citizens, we also can’t walk away from mainstay programs in our portfolio. That’s why we are creating a model to help us all consider the layers of programs which make up our overall efforts. At Annual Conference, we will begin to identify work that falls into each layer and the revenue sources that will fund our work.

Extension and Outreach should aim to be that trusted delivery person, providing welcome access to university research and education. After all, there is a reason we call so much of the work we do “program delivery.” See you there.

– Cathann

Programs , ,

Extension and Outreach Can Be Gloriously Messy

January 31st, 2014

One of the many joys of my job is the breadth of people I get the opportunity to interact with on a regular basis.  Yesterday for example, I was at a meeting with the Lt. Governor and heard fifth graders explaining their STEM project on habitats for small creatures.  There were frogs and millipedes involved in the demonstration.  A few weeks ago, I was meeting with winery owners and hearing their challenges with Iowa’s temperature extremes.  NOTE:  Wine was not  part of that demonstration.  And this morning, I was in a meeting with some physics professors as they attempted to “dumb down” the latest thinking on a coherent theory of the universe so I could grasp it.  I go home with my mind blown a lot.

That last one, though, is worth pondering. It used to be that physicists believed that they would one day uncover a coherent theory of how the entire universe holds together and works.  Now, the thinking is — maybe not.  Marcelo Gleiser at Dartmouth College argues against the likelihood of a unifying theory to explain the origins of the universe and our place in it.  In fact, according to Gleiser, the latest evidence reveals not only that there are imperfections in the fabric of the universe — they are the driving, creative forces behind its very existence. The universe, it turns out, is not elegant. It is gloriously messy.

I loved that idea when I heard it — and I saw Extension and Outreach as one small microcosm in that universe. The beauty of Extension and Outreach is that it IS kind of gloriously messy, and that’s where creativity happens. There isn’t one formula, or one way to organize, or one easy-to-follow blueprint that explains Extension and Outreach or predicts success in programming.  Our diverse partners and their ideas are wide-ranging and we want them engaged with us.  They often have different ideas about what they want, sometimes even contradictory.  This messiness gives us permission to experiment and be innovative. There likely will be more messiness this year as we take a closer look at our organizational culture and the direction we want Extension and Outreach to take moving forward.

To that end, all faculty, staff, and council members are welcome to participate in the 2014 Extension and Outreach Annual Conference. You’ll learn about our organizational culture, project and budget management, and putting new technology to work for programming — skills to help you navigate in this wonderful, organized chaos of Extension and Outreach.

It takes really dedicated people to do Extension and Outreach work. You have to be willing to experiment, to try different approaches, to live with ambiguity and imperfection. Sometimes our ideas work — sometimes even better than we thought they would. But sometimes they don’t work or don’t fit what our partner wanted and we have to start over and that’s part of the process. We are a learning organization. An important part of how we operate is that we try things, we learn from the experience, and we go on. Our 2014 annual conference will help us move Extension and Outreach forward. Here’s to embracing our gloriousness. See you there.

– Cathann

change, Partnerships , , , ,