Dealing with Head Lice

With kids back in school, it’s probably only a matter of time until you hear about head lice.  Anyone who comes in close contact with someone who already has head lice is at risk for acquiring head lice as they are easily transmitted from head to head.  Preschool and elementary-school children and their families are most often infected.  While head lice infestation is very common and has been around for centuries, they are contagious, an annoyance and disruption to family life, and sometimes tough to get rid of—been there, done that!

The head louse is a tiny, wingless parasitic insect that lives among human hairs and feeds on tiny amounts of blood drawn from the scalp.  While they are frustrating to deal with, they aren’t dangerous as they don’t spread disease.  However, their bites make a child’s head itchy and scratching can lead to infection.  It is best to treat head lice quickly once they are found as they spread easily from person to person.

Head scratching is usually the first sign that your child has head lice.  However, when scratching is noticed, the child already has an active case.  Therefore, it is best to check your child’s scalp weekly for nits (lice eggs) by parting the child’s hair into small sections and looking particularly near the scalp, around and behind the ears, and near the neckline at the back of the head. Even though small, nits can be seen by the naked eye.  Adult lice lay eggs on the hair shafts close to the scalp; nits look like dandruff, but can’t be removed by brushing or shaking them off.  The eggs hatch within 1 to 2 weeks after they have been laid.  After hatching, the egg casing remains firmly attached to the hair shaft and the newly immerged nymphs, smaller than a sesame seed with six tiny legs, are on the move seeking blood to survive.  Nymphs become adults within 1 to 2 weeks and are gray-white in color and about the size of a sesame seed. Nymphs and adults are often harder to spot as they move fast.  See the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website for pictures of the various lice stages and for the best information on how to treat lice.

Lice cannot jump or survive long without a human host.  They cannot spread to pets as they can only survive on human blood. They are spread by direct contact with the hair of an infested person.  Cleaning is a necessary part of ridding the home of head lice.  Here are some simple, but time consuming, ways to get rid of lice and prevent re-infestation:

  • Wash all bed linens and clothing that’s been recently worn by the infested person in very hot water; dry with the hot cycle of the dryer for at least 20 minutes.
  • Put stuffed animals and non-washable items in airtight bags for at least 3 days. Place the bags in the garage or someplace away from constant human contact.
  • Vacuum carpets and upholstered furniture (car seats, too); dispose of the vacuum cleaner bag in an airtight bag away from the home.
  • Clean hair-care items like combs, barrettes, hair ties or bands, headbands, and brushes by soaking in rubbing alcohol or medicated shampoo for an hour. If tolerated, these items can also be washed in the dishwasher.

Finally, know that having head lice is NOT a sign of poor hygiene or a dirty home.  They are a problem for all mankind.  Remind your kids to avoid head-to-head contact with other children and avoid sharing brushes and hair/head attire.  Most importantly, help them understand that while having lice can be embarrassing, they have not done anything wrong and they are not dirty.

Marlene Geiger

Marlene Geiger

I am a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a BS in Home Economics Education and Extension and from Colorado State University with a MS in Textiles and Clothing. I enjoy spending time with family and friends, gardening, quilting, cooking, sewing, and sharing knowledge and experience with others.

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Up with Strawberries!

During the spring, summer, and fall months, I repeatedly hear,  “ What do you have in your front yard—those white columns inside of a black fence?”  What these curiosity seekers are asking about are my strawberry towers—strawberry plants grown UP or vertically instead of in a bed.  And the fence????  “You know how strawberries run!”  Not, it’s to protect the plants from the deer and rabbits that enjoy the plants and fruits as much as I do.

Several years ago, we were traveling through Minnesota and came upon a pick-your-own strawberry farm in August.  Out of curiosity, we stopped.  Inside of a green house, we found pots atop pots of strawberries being grown vertically, not in the typical low-grow patch.  And hanging on those plants, were a plethora of huge, red, succulent strawberries.  It didn’t take me long to decide that this was a much better way to grow strawberries than in the garden bed we had.  I became almost giddy with excitement as I imagined not fighting weeds, rodents, bugs, and rotting strawberries.  And best of all, no “strawberry stance” back-bending or down-on-your-knees work looking under every leaf or reaching to the middle for another berry.

My husband spent considerable time researching where to purchase the strawberry towers we had seen in Minnesota and found them at  Agro-Tower.  We initially ordered one set of six to try them out. To keep the pots together and sturdy, my husband attached a metal pipe to the center of a tractor wheel weight.  The metal pipe slips through the center of each strawberry pot with the first pot resting on the weight; the tractor weight made a very sturdy anchor.  Each pot has six open cups to hold a single strawberry plant.  When stacked on top of each other, the openings are alternated so the plants receive adequate light and water and allow the fruit to hang out of for easy picking.  With success our first year, we ordered three additional sets.

However, it is not necessary to purchase containers as they can be an investment.  All kinds of containers can be used for growing strawberries.  In the process of searching for the towers, we came across numerous DIY web articles and u-tube videos showing different styles of towers and containers. The University of California’s master gardener’s page shows how to make bucket planters.  Strawberry plants easily adapt to small spaces so containers are perfect as long as the plants get sun and plenty of moisture and nutrients. Depending on the tower height and configuration, you can have dozens of plants in less than one square foot making them ideal for the patio or deck or as a piece of “art” in the flower garden.

Growing strawberries in tower containers is different than growing in a garden so you’ll want to keep the following tips in mind. (For additional information, check out Growing Strawberries in Containers.)

  1. Ever-bearing strawberry varieties are best for containers.  They bear some fruit in mid-June and occasionally through the summer; they give a good harvest late summer and into the fall right up to frost if the plants are carefully cared for.
  2. Potting soil is a must to provide good drainage and nutrient distribution.
  3. Purchase new plants and potting soil each season to avoid disease from the previous crop.
  4. Add a good vegetable and flower fertilizer to each container before planting. Fertilize frequently throughout the season to keep the plants healthy and productive.
  5. Trim the runners off when they start to appear. However, if you have a missing plant in your containers, you can lay a close runner on the missing area and let it take root.  Trimming the runners promotes growth and more berries in the fall.
  6. Keep the fruit picked off as the berries mature. This is definitely not hard to do!!

I find that the fruit quality is better when grown in containers.   Strawberries that sit on damp ground start to rot or seem to bring the potential for rot with them even after harvest so their shelf life is really short.  By keeping them up in the air, they dry quickly and are not in contact with diseases and funguses in the soil that cause rot.  Nearly every berry is perfect when plucked from the plant and have a longer shelf life in the refrig.  I store them unwashed in an open container in the refrigerator fruit drawer.  When I get too many to eat fresh, I wash, stem, place them on a cookie sheet, and pop them into the freezer for a couple of hours before I bag and return them to the freezer to use for smoothies, jams and other recipes throughout the winter months.

So if you enjoy red, ripe, juicy, sweet strawberries (high in vitamins and antioxidants, too) from the garden but detest the effort it takes to grow or pick them in a bed, consider going “up with strawberries!” I think you’ll be glad you did!

PS – Vertical gardens are good for some vegetables and herbs, too.

Marlene Geiger

Marlene Geiger

I am a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a BS in Home Economics Education and Extension and from Colorado State University with a MS in Textiles and Clothing. I enjoy spending time with family and friends, gardening, quilting, cooking, sewing, and sharing knowledge and experience with others.

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Canner Load Guidelines

Canning season is peaking right now and we recently had a question concerning canner loads for pressure canners. You don’t always have a full canner load when you are ready to can.
You must use a pressure canner that can hold at least 4 quart size jars even if you are never going to can quarts. That size is needed for the come-up and cool-down times to be accurate.
In 2016, Ball Canning issued new pressure canning guidance about the number of jars in a pressure canner load. Their new rule is a pressure canner load must consist of at least 2 quart jars or 4 pint jars at a time. This is to ensure proper pressure and temperature is achieved for safe processing.

If you have canning questions, please do not hesitate to contact us by phone or e-mail. We are happy to help!

Marcia Steed

Marcia Steed

I graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Home Economics Education. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends and traveling.

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How to safely help after a disaster

We have no doubt all seen the pictures of the disaster Hurricane Harvey caused recently. Many of us have a big desire to help but want to be careful and help in ways that are beneficial to those who need it most. It is sometimes hard to tell what is a scam and what is not. From the research I have done, cash donations are preferred over items. The areas needing help most are already overwhelmed and have no place to store or distribute items because so many places have been flooded out. It is important to do some research ourselves on which places are safe to donate cash to and to find out how much of that cash actually goes to the people who need it and how much of it stays with the organization for administrative purposes. It is also worth thinking about the long term for the people who have been affected. You may want to consider donating some now and again later when people are able to get back to their homes and assess the damage and the work that needs to be done. This article put out by Consumer Reports I think does a good job addressing concerns people who want to donate might have.

 

Marcia Steed

Marcia Steed

I graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Home Economics Education. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends and traveling.

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Ice Cream!

July was National Ice Cream Month, August 8th was National Frozen Custard Day and August 19th National Soft Ice Cream Day! It seems there are more and more choices in the frozen dessert aisle these days which got me wondering what the difference is among the different types of frozen desserts. U.S. law classifies ice creams by their percentage of milk fat content. By that federal law, ice cream must contain at least 10% milkfat. It is made with more cream than milk so because of the higher fat content, up to 50% of the volume of the ice cream consists of air that has been churned into it. As you know, it is much easier to whip air into cream than into milk.

Super Premium ice cream, as you might expect, has the most fat – between 14% and 18%. If it is the French style of ice cream, it is a cooked custard made with egg yolks. Frozen custard or French ice cream must have  at least 1.4% egg yolk solids. Frozen custard is significantly richer than ice creams made without eggs.

Premium ice cream has between 11% and 15% fat.

Regular ice cream is much less dense than Super Premium or Premium ice cream. It has between 10% and 11% fat and a lot more air. This is the type of ice cream made by large manufacturers usually in the basic flavors.

Economy ice cream contains exactly 10% fat, which again is the minimum USDA standard. Anything with less than 10% fat cannot be considered ice cream without being labeled “light”.

Soft serve is molecularly similar to regular ice cream but is served at a higher temperature that allows it to be extruded into a soft swirl and gives it a lighter, softer texture. Soft serve has a lower fat content and interestingly enough, its warmer temperature actually allows your taste buds to taste the ice cream better!

You will also find sorbet, sherbet and gelato in the frozen dessert aisle. Sorbet is made from water and fruit puree or juice. It contains no milk, cream or eggs.

Sherbet is not quite ice cream and not quite sorbet. It is made with fruit and water but also has the addition of dairy. It has a slightly creamier texture than sorbet. By law, sherbet must have less than 2% fat.

Gelato is made with regular milk. It may seem to have a richer texture than ice cream but it’s dense texture from not being able to churn as much air into it compared to ice cream is what creates a richer mouth feel. Because gelato has less fat than ice cream, the flavors of gelato are typically stronger. Gelato is typically made with natural ingredients where ice cream often is made with a combination of artificial flavorings and natural fruit.

Summer is my favorite season and part of it has to do with my enjoyment of frozen desserts! I hope you are enjoying some this Summer as well!

 

Marcia Steed

Marcia Steed

I graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Home Economics Education. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends and traveling.

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Air Fryers

My sister-in-law is interested in purchasing an air fryer. It is a new concept to me so I decided to do some research on it for both she and I. The basic premise is you can fry foods in air rather than oil. I think we would all agree that if we could enjoy our favorite fried foods without all the extra fat calories from the oil we would be very interested in doing that!

Hot air frying machines work by circulating extremely hot air around food using a mechanical fan that cooks the food and produces a crispy layer on the outside while keeping the inside moist. This would be similar to the way convection cooking is done. The only oil needed is what is brushed on the food before air frying. They do caution to not overload the air fryer as the food wouldn’t cook properly and could even lead to unsafe foods by staying at bacteria-friendly temperatures for too long. So cooking in smaller batches would be a necessity.

If purchasing an air fryer you would want to consider several things like the amount of counter space the appliance will take up, the wattage required to run the appliance, the capacity and what settings are available. On the plus side, it seems an air fryer would be a lot safer as there would be no pots of boiling oil around. It would also be less work in the beginning, there would be no oil to dispose of, no lingering smell in the house, and you would not feel as heavy full after eating. On the minus side, you cannot replicate the texture or flavor of foods that were traditionally deep fat fried and the actual cooking time is significantly longer. Plus air fryers are a bit pricey.

The jury is still out for me to consider purchasing an air fryer but the concept is an interesting one!

 

Marcia Steed

Marcia Steed

I graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Home Economics Education. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends and traveling.

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Do College Students Need Insurance?

Whew!  You just got your college student settled into their college dorm or apartment after likely making a number of purchases for towels, sheets, waste baskets, storage boxes, and the list goes on.  Hopefully they have everything they need. But, did you think about insurance?

It’s a good idea for parents with college students away from home to check their homeowners, health, and auto insurance policies to see which situations are covered and which aren’t and if you might need to buy more protection for peace of mind.

Homeowners or Renters Insurance. Most kids leave home with electronic gear, clothes, bicycles, and lots of other stuff.  In many cases, a dependent child’s personal belongs will be covered up to a certain percentage of their parent’s protection plan so long as the student lives in an organized living unit such as a dormitory, sorority or fraternity.  However, there may be a 10 percent limit on possessions coverage because the items are not in the home.  If that is the case, additional coverage for PCs, tablets, and other pricey items may be an option to consider with higher limits and coverage for loss or damage.

Students who study abroad or choose to live in an apartment, rented house, or mobile home may not have coverage under a parents’ homeowners policy.  In that case, a separate basic renter’s policy would be warranted to protect personal belongings.  These plans usually protect students against theft, fire, accidental damage by electricity or water, flood, earthquake, vandalism, and other personal loss that may occur while at school or studying abroad. Personal property items usually covered include computers, laptops, tablets, smart phones, books, clothes, bicycles, and much more.

Health Insurance. Students under 26-years of age and attending school in the same state as their parents generally can stay on their parents’ insurance policy. However, it is important to check to see whether the plan network extends to doctors and hospitals in the area where the student will be.  Many policies provide little or no coverage for out-of-network care, except for emergencies. Students who go out-of-state, are 26-years or older, or are not claimed as a dependent will need to explore health insurance alternatives such as purchasing an individual policy through the local health insurance exchange or directly from an agent or through their college if a health insurance plan is offered.  Student health plans generally offer basic coverage for the campus clinic and a nearby hospital.  These plans may also be a good supplement for those students who find themselves in an out-of-network situation with their family plan.  For any plan option, the student should have an insurance card with them at school in the event that they need medical treatment.

Auto Insurance. Let your insurer know if your child will be taking a car to school; there may be a price adjustment based on the school’s location. Make sure that the student has a current proof of insurance card in their vehicle along with the 24-hr claim number. If a student will be more than 100 miles from home without a vehicle, some companies offer a price break; in this case, you will want to keep the student on your policy so that they can drive at home on breaks. Car or no car, remember the good-student discount; students who maintain a B average or better qualify for a 5% to 15% discount.

College is an exciting time in a child’s life. As you say the last goodbye in the parking lot, you realize more than ever that you can’t protect your student from every risk.  But you can provide an “umbrella” from the unpredictable incidents by making sure that they have the proper insurance coverage and making them aware of the coverage they have.

Marlene Geiger

Marlene Geiger

I am a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a BS in Home Economics Education and Extension and from Colorado State University with a MS in Textiles and Clothing. I enjoy spending time with family and friends, gardening, quilting, cooking, sewing, and sharing knowledge and experience with others.

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Oh No, my freezer is out!

We tend to get calls about freezers going out any time during the year; but most often during winter storms. I was surprised recently when I discovered that my nearly 40-year-old freezer quit while my husband and I were away on vacation. We had nearly a quarter of a beef, several frozen pizzas, a whole chicken, and a pork tenderloin in the freezer. It was a shock as I’d never had this happen before. It is possible to claim food losses on home owner’s insurance but we chose not to make a claim. At the time I discovered the freezer had quit, enough time had lapsed that all the meat was totally thawed and was cool but not cold.

When you discover that the freezer is not working, it is important to determine why it is no longer working. Some of our callers find that the freezer was accidently unplugged, or a fuse has blown, or someone has left the freezer door open. It is not uncommon during an ice storm to have the power off for several days. It the problem can be fixed—plugging the freezer cord back into the outlet, or tripping the circuit breaker, check to see if the freezer contents are still completely frozen or partially frozen. If the contents have at least some ice crystals remaining it will be safe to refreeze the item. Ice cream would be an exception to that rule as the thawed ice cream will refreeze with much larger crystals resulting in a food that would not be enjoyable.

If the freezer outage is due to a power outage you will want to do what you can to keep all the food from thawing. When callers have this problem, we have a few questions that we typically ask. If the outage is not expected to be more than 12-24 hours, the freezer can be covered with a blanket or bags of ice can be added to help keep the temperature down inside the freezer. Avoid opening the freezer to keep it cold inside longer. If a longer outage is expected, the caller can take the food to a meet locker if available, or purchase some dry ice to keep the contents cold for a longer period.

Here is some advice from the National Center for Home Food Preservation on what to do with thawed foods. Some thawed foods can be re-frozen. However, the texture will not be as good. Other foods may need to be discarded.

  • Meat and Poultry: Re-freeze if the freezer temperature stays 40°F or below and if color and odor are good. Check each package, and discard any if signs of spoilage such as an off color or off odor are present. Discard any packages that are above 40°F (or at room temperature).
  • Vegetables: Re-freeze only if ice crystals are still present or if the freezer temperature is 40°F or below. Discard any packages that show signs of spoilage or that have reached room temperature.
  • Fruits: Re-freeze if they show no signs of spoilage. Thawed fruits may be used in cooking or making jellies, jams, or preserves. Fruits survive thawing with the least damage to quality.
  • Shellfish and Cooked Foods: Re-freeze only if ice crystals are still present or the freezer is 40°F or below. If the temperature is above 40°F, throw these foods out.
  • Ice Cream: If partially thawed, throw it out. The texture of ice cream is not acceptable after thawing. If its temperature rises above 40°F, it could be unsafe.
  • Creamed Foods, Puddings and Cream Pies: Re-freeze only if freezer temperature is 40°F or below. Discard if the temperature is above 40°F.
  • Breads, Nuts, Doughnuts, Cookies and Cakes: These foods re-freeze better than most. They can be safely re-frozen if they show no signs of mold growth.

All of the food in my freezer was totally thawed and beginning to not have a very pleasant aroma. I’m now spending some of my free time shopping for a new freezer. If the new one lasts as long as my old one, I should not have to replace it.

Liz Meimann

Liz Meimann

I received both my undergraduate and graduate degrees in Food Science at Iowa State University. I love to quilt, sew, cook, and bake. I spent many years gardening, canning, and preserving food for my family when my children were at home.

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Rental Car Insurance: Do You Need It?

With family members spread across the US, I find myself flying to their destination and then renting a car so that I have my independence during my visit.  Even though I reserve a car in advance and have already checked the box declining rental car insurance, I get the standard question at the car rental counter:  “Do you need/want rental car insurance?”  Put on the spot, you might not know and therefore, feel compelled to purchase. And that’s  exactly what rental companies are counting on and the commissions for selling you the coverage.  For me the answer is usually “no,” but that may not be true for everyone.  Here are some guidelines on how to find out if you need rental car insurance and help you make an informed decision when you’re at the rental counter.

Talk to your insurance agent.  Coverage from your own auto policy usually applies when you are using a rental car for personal, nonbusiness purposes. By accepting counter coverage, you may be paying extra for something you already have.  According to State Farm Insurance, you should ask your agent these key questions:

  • Does my auto policy liability, comprehensive and collision coverage and any deductibles extend to rental car agreements? Make sure that coverage also includes theft or damage to a rental car.  If you have collision and comprehensive coverage on your own policy, it generally will extend to a rental car. However, you will still be on the hook for your deductible. Your own liability insurance should cover if you do damage to others, but make sure you have adequate liability coverage ($1 million is recommended).
  • Does my auto policy cover administrative or towing fees for rental cars?
  • Does my homeowners or renters insurance extend to personal items in a rental car (off-premises coverage)? In most cases, homeowners or renters insurance will cover your possessions if they are stolen, even away from home. To make a theft claim, you’ll need to file a police report.  Check with your agent about the limits of your coverage; off-premises items are usually only covered up to a certain percentage of your personal property coverage. The deductible on your homeowners or renters insurance will apply.
  • Does my auto policy offer loss of income coverage to the rental company?
  • Does my auto policy offer personal injury protection or a MedPay?  If you have health insurance, medical payments coverage or personal injury protection on your car insurance policy, you may already have coverage comparable to what the rental company offers.

Talk to your credit card company or review the company’s policy on rental cars.  If you pay for a rental car with a major credit card, there’s a good chance that the issuing company offers secondary insurance at no charge.  Secondary insurance typically covers additional expenses and deductibles beyond an existing auto policy.

Be familiar with the coverage options provided by your employer.  Coverage extensions of your auto policy or credit card may not apply if you rent a car for business.  Likewise, if you rent for pleasure, your company coverage may not be apply.

Having done your research, you will know whether you need coverage from a rental company or not. Further, there are companies that sell standalone policies for rental cars if you don’t want to buy insurance at the counter. You will need to decline the rental company’s coverage to use a standalone policy.

If coverage is warranted, never sign anything or agree to coverage without reading the policy thoroughly and understanding what coverage is included or limited. Should something unfortunate happen, you don’t want any surprises. Most rental companies have their policies available for review online so you can read them in advance of renting.   If you have no auto policy or your existing policies do not cover rental cars or you have limited auto coverage, the following should be considered at the counter or from a standalone policy:

Liability or supplemental liability.  This protection will pay for damage you do to others’ vehicles or property. A typical limit is $1 million. Liability coverage is a must.

Collision/loss damage waiver. In place of collision or comprehensive coverage, counter policies offer LDW OR CDW which helps cover damage or repair costs, administrative fees, and towing.  Technically it is not insurance but rather a waiver and the waiver typically excludes coverage for damage caused by speeding or driving on unpaved roads.

Personal accident insurance.  This insurance covers medical costs (ambulance, medical care, and death benefits) for you and your passengers if you’re involved in an accident.

Personal effects coverage.   If your personal belongings are stolen from the rental car, this coverage pays for loss up to a set dollar amount.

The rental company’s extra coverage might make sense in a few cases. For that reason, it’s important to understand your existing coverage and what the rental agency is offering.

Marlene Geiger

Marlene Geiger

I am a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a BS in Home Economics Education and Extension and from Colorado State University with a MS in Textiles and Clothing. I enjoy spending time with family and friends, gardening, quilting, cooking, sewing, and sharing knowledge and experience with others.

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Ants in the house

We have been having a lot of calls about ants in the home lately and I must confess, I’ve been seeing them in my house this summer too. We put a kitchen and great room addition on to our house last summer. We made every effort to seal things up tightly to prevent mice and insects from entering. I was sad to see some ants on my kitchen counter today before I came into work. I thought that a bit of research was in order to see just how or where the ants were entering.

The first place to look is in obvious cracks or seams where the wall comes together. This isn’t an issue at my house. Second would be to look at gaps in the foundation. Again, that doesn’t seem to be an issue for me. The article that I looked at suggested that ants may already have spaces under the floor or carpeting where they already have trails established. I know that could be an issue in an older section of the house but I hope that they do not have any trails in the newer parts of my home. Older windows that do not fit tight can also be a point of entry for the ants. Doors that no longer fit tightly will allow ants to enter. The best possibility for ants to enter my home is, I think, the holes that we drilled in the walls to allow electric, phone, cable and gas lines. Another alternative that I don’t like to think about is the possibility that the ants may have been born inside my house.

If I want to keep ants out, there are a few simple steps that will make my home less attractive to the ants. I can seal up cracks and calk around the gas and other lines that enter my home. Keeping things clean in the kitchen, rinsing sticky dishes and being sure that there are no crumbs or pet food available to the ants will help. Ants also look for moisture, so leaky faucets should be repaired and changing the pet’s water bowl often should help reduce the possibility of ants in the home.

I will take a fresh look around my home tonight after work and see just what I need to do to eliminate the ants inside my house before they become a problem.

Liz Meimann

Liz Meimann

I received both my undergraduate and graduate degrees in Food Science at Iowa State University. I love to quilt, sew, cook, and bake. I spent many years gardening, canning, and preserving food for my family when my children were at home.

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