Holiday greetings from Beardshear Hall

John Lawrence’s message from Dec. 17, 2018

As we approach Christmas and the end of the year, I want to thank all of you who have made 2018 a good year for ISU Extension and Outreach and for me personally. It has been a busy year with listening sessions, centennial celebrations and county fairs, along with day-to-day operations and long-range planning.

county map of Iowa.While the map in my office shows the places I have visited in the 21 months since I started this role, it doesn’t capture the hundreds of people I have met and discussions I have had. It also doesn’t reflect the dedication and passion of our staff and faculty, nor the appreciation Iowans have for the work you do. That would be a topographic map showing a mountain range. Thank you for all you do for Iowa State and Iowans.

I hope you will take time during the holidays for friends and family, to appreciate the blessings we each enjoy and to catch your breath before diving into 2019. My break will be different this year. My daughter is getting married Dec. 29. She, my son-in-law-to-be and some of his family from Germany will be joining us for Christmas. Then the wagon train of people and decorations will move to the Lied Lodge in Nebraska City, Nebraska, for the wedding. Think of a destination wedding with a beautiful venue, but without the beach. It also is near where Kathy and I grew up and our families.

Thus far, the wedding plans are going well, considering the groom didn’t have a visa to enter the country a week ago. The bride and mother-of-the-bride have only occasional moments of panic, thinking of things left to do. I tend to focus on the things NOT to do, like don’t ask how much something cost or don’t think about the emotions of walking Caitlin down the aisle. Father issues aside, I am really excited about the holidays and the wedding.

Happy holidays and best wishes for the coming year!

Goodbye … and welcome

In November, we said goodbye to the following individuals:

  • Renae Kadolph, account clerk, Extension Store.
  • Elizabeth Kurt, program coordinator II, Conference Planning and Management.

We welcome the following new staff:

  • Lynnae Smits, Sioux County Clover Kids program assistant.
  • Tenysa Handrock, Clarke County office assistant.
  • Debbie Van Horn, Davis County office assistant.
  • Erin Greazel, Story County program coordinator.
  • Angela Ayala, Dallas County education program assistant.
  • Hilary Pierce, extension program specialist II, Agriculture and Natural Resources.
  • Leslie Stonehocker, program coordinator II, 4-H Youth Development.
  • Brian Dougherty, field specialist II, Agriculture and Natural Resources.

More notes

  • Nearly 30 Extension professionals from ISU Extension and Outreach Polk County and K-State Research and Extension from Johnson and Wyandotte counties participated in the 2018 Urban Extension Exchange Nov. 28 in Olathe, Kansas. Extension professionals from the three similarly sized county extension offices met to learn about internal operations, expand their professional network, facilitate idea sharing and highlight best practices. For more information, contact Paul Gibbins, Polk County executive director, pgibbins@iastate.edu.
  • Many Iowa State offices and departments will operate at reduced levels Monday, Dec. 24, through Tuesday, Jan. 1, as part of the annual partial campus closing during the winter break. Many building thermostats can be adjusted during this time, resulting in significant energy savings for the university. Campus offices are to include their reduced office hours and emergency contact information in voice messages and on websites.
  • The ISU Extension and Outreach Awards nomination deadline is noon, Jan. 4, 2019. Check the awards website for the list of awards, eligibility and criteria, and nomination forms.
  • The Excellence in Extension grants submissions deadline is noon, Jan. 4, 2019. Individual grant information and application instructions are online.

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

Integrated Crop Management … times 30

John Lawrence’s message from Nov. 26, 2018

2018 has been a challenging year for Iowa crop production, given difficult growing conditions, tight margins and uncertainty on trade issues. That is all the more reason for farm operators to make informed, research-based decisions to increase the likelihood for success. It’s no surprise that 900 farmers, agribusiness professionals, industry representatives and educators are coming to Ames Nov. 28-29 for the Integrated Crop Management Conference. It’s the 30th annual meeting of inquiring ag minds to network and learn about research findings and technology from across the Midwest. Did you know?

  • This year guest speakers will discuss in-field variability and effects on yield, digital technology in U.S. crop production, nitrogen needs and recommendations, tar spot in corn, and crop rotation and environmental stresses limiting corn and soybean yields.
  • The 2018 program also will include weather and crop market outlooks, selling cover crop seed, the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, insect resistance to Bt crops, soybean gall midge, and weed and crop disease management updates.
  • New this year is the Women in Ag Breakfast, offering women attending the conference an opportunity to network, discuss common goals and challenges, and explore potential mentoring or programming ideas.
  • Last year attendees reported they had direct impact on 1.8 million acres of corn and soybeans, and estimated a profit increase of $5-10 per acre because of knowledge they gained from the conference.

ISU Extension and Outreach and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences host the ICM conference, and every year bring together a diverse range of topics, a slate of expert presenters, and results of the latest university research to help Iowa agriculture thrive, no matter the challenges.

More notes

  • Our Women in Ag program’s conference, “The Conversations of Leadership,” is already in progress and continues tomorrow. Speakers and panelists are covering a variety of leadership topics from conflict resolution to farm transition decisions, career conversations and organizational leadership. All sessions are designed to build skills that enhance women’s leadership on and off the farm.
  • I will be visiting with campus-based extension staff and faculty today and again on Tuesday, Dec. 4. Both sessions are 3-4:30 p.m. in 3228 Memorial Union. Like my visits to all 20 regions, the primary purpose of these visits is to listen and learn, and gather input to inform our needs assessment and help us carry out our strategic plan.
  • The 2019 Annual Conference planning team needs your help. Please send your selfie to Rachel Tendall, rtendall@iastate.edu, by noon, Dec. 3. She’ll be compiling all the photos she receives into an ISU Extension and Outreach team portrait that will be revealed when the conference registration opens. Close-up photos are preferred, and feel free to show your personality.
  • The next “Creating Accessible Digital Documents” workshops are Dec. 4 and 5 in the Humboldt County office in Humboldt. Registration is open.
  • For an update on the Internal Communications Task Force Nov. 16 meeting, read the executive summary on Cybox.
  • The Structured for Success committee met Nov. 19. Check the website for a video report and related documents from the meeting.

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

WOW: Our building, councils, awards and EIE grants

John Lawrence’s message from Nov. 5, 2018

It’s always a good idea to remember your anniversary. So I want to make sure you’re all aware that Nov. 8 is the 15th anniversary of the Extension 4-H Building, home of the WOW Center. Did you know?

  • WOW stands for “Why Opportunity Works.” The WOW Center was designed as an interactive area to interest youth in STEM and other fields in higher education.
  • In the WOW Center you’ll find two additions to Iowa State’s Art on Campus program: terrazzo floors by artists Carolyn Braaksma and Brad Kaspari, and a bronze casting of Christian Petersen’s “4-H Calf.” (Depending on the day, you also might find a “STEM Lit to Go!” or other 4-H materials assembly line or a meeting, workshop or other activity taking place.)
  • ISU Extension and Outreach broke ground for the building on June 27, 2002. 4-H youth, ISU and extension administrators, and representatives from the Iowa 4-H Foundation and Iowa Farm Bureau Federation participated.
  • The building was completely funded by $4.7 million in private contributions from individuals, businesses and organizations. Iowa Farm Bureau Federation provided $1 million to help build the new facility. Pioneer Hi-Bred International also contributed to the project.
  • When the building was dedicated Nov. 8, 2003, it was heralded as a gateway to Iowa State University and a welcoming place for Iowa youth and their families.

Also remember to thank our extension council members, who “wow” us with their support for ISU Extension and Outreach every day. They bring their understanding of local issues to important decisions about extension educational opportunities. They must be good stewards of taxpayer dollars as they bring significant programs to their county to help people solve critical issues affecting their lives.

On Tuesday, Nov. 6, Iowa voters in every county have the opportunity to elect five members to their county council. Depending on the county, candidates on this year’s ballot include Iowans who are running for the first time as well as incumbents seeking another term. Beginning in December, we’ll be providing orientation training for these new and returning council members.

Here are two more “wows” to acknowledge the great work you all do.

  • It’s time to submit nominations for ISU Extension and Outreach Awards. Check the awards website for the list of awards, eligibility and criteria, and nomination forms. The awards nomination deadline is noon, Jan. 4, 2019. The deadline is earlier this year because our annual conference is Feb. 28, earlier than in previous years. The awards will be presented during annual conference. All ISU Extension and Outreach employees (campus, field and county) are eligible, as are volunteers and extension councils.
  • Apply now for Excellence in Extension grants to improve and enrich the quality of ISU Extension and Outreach educational programs. All ISU Extension and Outreach employees (campus, field and county) are eligible. Up to $17,000 will be awarded in 2019 for professional development and continuing education, program innovation and program improvement. Individual grant information and application instructions are online. The grants submissions deadline is noon, Jan. 4, 2019. If you have questions about the grants or application, contact Alison Boelman, aboelman@iastate.edu.

More notes

  • The Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute, Human Sciences Extension and Outreach, and ISU Extension and Outreach will award three $80,000 grants ($40,000 per year for two years) to eligible ISU Extension and Outreach county offices to participate in “PROSPERing Step-by-Step, State-by-State” (P2S). The primary goal of the P2S project is to address opioid misuse in rural counties through the delivery of programs that are evidence-based or reviewed and endorsed by the National Extension Opioid Crisis Response Workgroup. The funding is provided for an educator’s time on the project and to implement required activities. Nov. 30 is the deadline for completing a P2S Readiness/Capacity Assessment form, an initial step in the county grant selection process. For more information about this opportunity check the website, http://helpingkidsprosper.org/p2s.
  • Check the November program update from the leadership team.
  • Structured for Success – Please provide the committee your input through Structured for Success Survey 1 on two important questions: 1) What are the essential functions for ISU Extension and Outreach to successfully educate and serve Iowans and 2) What questions would you ask of other states to better understand how their extension system is organized. You may also leave other feedback for the committee through this anonymous survey. If you have an extension colleague in another state and would like to help us collect information on how that state is organized, please let me know.
  • The next “Creating Accessible Digital Documents” workshops are Nov. 13 and 14 at the Mills County office in Malvern. Registration is open.
  • Please do not have clients send soil samples to the Soil and Plant Analysis Lab in Agronomy. The lab is closed and no longer is processing samples. Discussions are underway about modernizing and reopening the lab, but if and when it happens will be well into the future. Check with your field agronomist or horticulture specialists for the name and addresses of private labs that will process soil samples.

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

Design thinking for place-based issues

John Lawrence’s message from Oct. 22, 2018

What do Audubon, Bedford, Coggon, Durant, Mount Pleasant, Royal, Sumner, Treynor, Van Meter and Walcott have in common? They all will participate in the Iowa’s Living Roadways Community Visioning Program over the next year. This is one of the ways our Community and Economic Development unit harnesses the power of design thinking to address place-based issues facing Iowa communities. Did you know?

  • The Iowa Department of Transportation sponsors the program in partnership with ISU Landscape Architecture Extension and Trees Forever.
  • To be considered for the program, communities must have a population of fewer than 10,000 residents, existing transportation-related issues, and a committee of volunteers willing to dedicate time and talent to the visioning process.
  • More than 230 communities have participated in Community Visioning since Iowa’s Living Roadways was created in 1996.

Each community will form a local steering committee representing a cross-section of local demographics, including youth. Beginning in November, these committees will work with extension specialists and other technical experts and participate in facilitated meetings, on-site assessments, technical design assistance, and public workshops – about 100 hours-worth over the next year. Each committee’s work will result in a transportation enhancement plan reflecting the community’s identity and values.

More notes

  • Our 2019 ISU Extension and Outreach Annual Conference is set for Feb. 28. Please save the date. Details will be available in the coming months.
  • You can still register for the next “Creating Accessible Digital Documents workshop, Oct. 30 in the Extension 4-H Building on campus in Ames.
  • More than 80 office professionals from throughout the state will be on campus Oct. 23-24 for the Office Professionals Conference. Office professionals are valued members of our extension family, and we’re pleased to provide this opportunity for professional development.
  • You can still share your ideas with our Internal Communications Task Force. Two new Community Conversations are being added: Nov. 5 in Ames and Nov. 9 in Garner. (To participate, register online at http://bit.ly/ictf11409.) You can send comments to ictfcomments@iastate.edu until Oct. 29. Some task force members still have dates available for individual discussions. Anyone in our system may anonymously complete an electronic survey, which is open through Oct. 29. For an update on the task force’s Oct. 18 meeting, read the executive summary on Cybox.
  • The Structured for Success committee held meeting #2 on Thursday, Oct. 18. The agenda, summary notes and video are on the County Services website. Structured for Success now has a menu button on the navigation bar to make it easier to find.
  • Congratulations to Jennifer Bentley, Himar Hernandez and Courtney Long. They will represent ISU Extension and Outreach in the 2019 National Extension Leadership Development program. NELD participants are selected because of their proven track record of programmatic or administrative success.

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

Impressed and proud

John Lawrence’s message from Oct. 15, 2018

I wrapped up my VP visits last week. After 20 regions, 60 meetings, 1,200 people and 4,000 miles, I don’t know if I made a larger impression on the stakeholders, staff and councils, or on the seat of my pickup. However, the visits have certainly made an impression on me. I am extremely proud of our organization and our people. The stakeholders at the table reflect the respect that ISU Extension and Outreach holds locally. The staff and councils care deeply about their communities and the people they serve, as well as their connection to Iowa State.

Now the real work begins. Did you know?

  • The leadership team will begin digesting and summarizing all the information that was gathered during the visits.
  • We anticipate having a statewide report and regional reports completed around the end of the year.
  • The next steps will be identifying and prioritizing the issues that we can address, so we can develop and implement a plan to create a strong Iowa.

Goodbye … and welcome

A comment I heard many times during my visits around the state was that we often don’t know when colleagues retire or resign or when new folks join our team. So we’re going to fix that. From now on, around mid-month, I will include a list of people who have recently left or joined ISU Extension and Outreach – in the counties, in the field and on campus. In September, we said good bye to the following individuals:

  • Connie Brommel, Warren County office assistant
  • Joann Bartusek, Cerro Gordo County office manager/bookkeeper
  • Camilla Marshek, Johnson County youth coordinator
  • Janet Neppl, Dickinson County office assistant
  • Becky Oelkers, Cerro Gordo County office assistant/4-H support
  • Joe Sellers, field specialist III, ANR
  • Greg Brenneman, field specialist IV, ANR
  • Nathan Crane, regional director, County Services

We welcome the following new staff:

  • Ashtin Harris, Mahaska County office assistant
  • JeanDarrell Waybill, Hamilton County youth coordinator
  • Pamela Kollasch, Kossuth County office assistant
  • Don-Marie Myers, Webster County PROSPER family coach
  • Laura Webb, Cedar County office assistant
  • Katrina Sauter, Scott County youth program assistant
  • Kaysee Phelps, Henry County program coordinator
  • Grant Theesfeld, Sac County Clover Kids program coordinator
  • Ronald Nelson, communications specialist I, Professional Development

More notes

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

45 down, 6 to go

John Lawrence’s message from Oct. 8, 2018

From a February morning in Cherokee County to a September afternoon at the Audubon Rec Center, ISU Extension and Outreach has celebrated 45 county centennials so far in 2018. Six more counties will reach their 100-year milestone yet this year. I have been privileged to attend 28 of these events and I’ve traveled over 6,300 miles. If my schedule permits, I hope to get to a few more. These celebrations have offered some one-of-a-kind experiences. Did you know?

  • I shared the spotlight with a juggler in Calhoun County, the Iowa History 101 RV in Decatur County, and my guy Cy on several occasions.
  • I rode in a mule-drawn covered wagon during Monroe County’s parade, whereas in Shelby County, I flashed back to my youth by riding on a hay rack with temperatures in the 90s and high humidity (thankfully, no bales this time). I saw, but did not ride, the Budweiser Clydesdales in Delaware County.
  • When I wasn’t able to attend a county’s celebration, someone else from our leadership team was happy to step in and represent ISU Extension and Outreach.

For example, Bob Dodds took part in the 100-year plaque presentation during the opening flag ceremony of the Crawford County Fair. He even was included in the group photo taken with Denison’s Big Bull.

Whether held at county fairs, nature centers, a dance pavilion or other unique location, these 100-year events have brought Iowans together to celebrate our 99 county campus and land-grant mission. We’ll wrap up in 2019 with our final three anniversaries — in Page, Dallas and Jefferson counties. We all can be proud of our heritage as we look toward our shared future. We will continue engaging citizens with university resources in partnership with federal, state and county governments as we work together for a strong Iowa.

More notes

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

Why we report

John Lawrence’s message from Oct. 1, 2018

Happy federal fiscal new year! Today we begin our work for FY2019, while we also get ready to report on FY2018 and start planning for FY2020. In the meantime, USDA NIFA approved our federal FY2017 ISU Combined Research and Extension Annual Report of Accomplishments and Results. We report on USDA’s six priority areas incorporated into our seven broad, interdisciplinary programs. Did you know?

  • We report on outputs, outcomes and impacts for community and economic development, expanding human potential, food security, health and well-being, natural resources and environmental stewardship, sustainable and renewable energy, and K-12 youth development.
  • Our program units annually plan for the metrics they’ll report on. However, if an issue emerges that we need to address, such as a natural disaster or an economic crisis, we can reallocate staff time and divert resources accordingly.
  • In late November, USDA NIFA will open FY2018 reporting, and we’ll start crunching numbers and writing impact narratives to meet a Feb. 1 internal deadline. At Iowa State, extension is closely integrated with research, so ISU Extension and Outreach and the Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station submit one joint report.
  • Together we report on all research and extension work accomplished through federal funds. By late March, the CALS dean, representing the Experiment Station, and I will sign off on the report, which we’ll submit to USDA NIFA by April 1. Sometime next June, USDA will approve our report.

We report so we can share the value and impact of ISU Extension and Outreach – whether we’re reporting to USDA, the university, the Board of Regents, state government, our partners and stakeholders, or directly to Iowans. We strive to be intentional and consistent. Every data point you provide is used in at least one report and often several, as well as staff success stories, research journal articles and grant applications. Reporting helps us tell our story to make sure our stakeholders, partners, funders and all Iowans will continue to support our work for a strong Iowa. Thank you for all you do.

More notes

  • Please join me in congratulating Lesia Oesterreich, adjunct assistant professor and family life extension specialist, who will receive the 2018 Excellence in Extension Award from USDA NIFA, Cooperative Extension, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. The award is given annually to one Cooperative Extension professional in the nation who excels at programming, provides visionary leadership and makes a positive impact on constituents served.
  • We’re looking for Rising Star interns for summer 2019. This cooperative program involves ISU Extension and Outreach, County Extension Districts, and the colleges of Design, Agriculture and Life Sciences, Human Sciences, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. If you know any Iowa State students who would be a good fit for the program, direct them to the Rising Star Internship website for more information and to apply.
  • Interim Vice President and Chief Information Officer Kristen Constant shares this message: FEMA will conduct its first test of a national wireless emergency alert system Oct. 3 at 1:18 p.m. The alert, with the headline “Presidential Alert,” is scheduled to pop up on every cell phone in the nation (similar to AMBER alerts). Cell towers are scheduled to broadcast for 30 minutes and cell phones may receive these texts over that entire time (and possibly beyond). This test is not associated with the university, nor is it associated with our “ISU Alert” service. No action will be required when cell phone owners receive the test message. ITS will monitor effects on our local systems.
  • The study committee I wrote about in the Sept. 4 update met for the first time Saturday, Sept. 29. This is the first of many meetings the committee will have over the coming year as it studies how ISU Extension and Outreach is organized in the counties and the county-to-campus connection. The committee soon will have a webpage for sharing meeting summaries and other information. I’ll share the link when it’s available.

Members of the committee are:

  • Jamie David (Taylor County Council) jamie.david1421@gmail.com
  • Lori Donahoe (Johnson County Council) ldonahoe11@hotmail.com
  • Paul Gieselman (Louisa County Council) herr_giesel@louisacomm.net
  • Molly Hewitt (Woodbury County Director) hewittm@iastate.edu
  • Katharinna Bain (Keokuk County Director) kbain@iastate.edu
  • Cheryl Heronemus (Region 1 Director) hero@iastate.edu
  • Larry Tranel (Field Specialist, NE Iowa) tranel@iastate.edu
  • Terry Maloy (IECA Executive Director) maloy@iastate.edu
  • Bob Dodds (Assistant VP for County Services) redodds@iastate.edu
  • John Lawrence (VP for Extension and Outreach) jdlaw@iastate.edu

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

For better communication

John Lawrence’s message from Sept. 17, 2018

Sometimes we have trouble communicating with each other in our complex organization, and the challenge cuts across all our programs. That’s why in spring 2018 I appointed an internal communications task force, led by Deb Sellers and Ross Wilburn, to determine how we could improve communication within all of ISU Extension and Outreach.

The task force members – Deb and Ross along with Ann Torbert, Terry Torneten, Alex Merk, Andrea Nelson, Ben Pullen and Mary Giese – began their work without preconceived notions of the outcome. Instead, this group of our colleagues has been focused on listening. They want to develop strategies we can implement within our system to help us all do a better job of carrying out our mission. Did you know?

  • They are gathering information from across our system on barriers that impede, as well as ways to improve, our internal communication.
  • They want to ensure all voices are heard.
  • They will assess, evaluate and determine the most important issues for our system to address in the short- and long-term.
  • They will provide a final report with recommendations to the leadership team.

We all have a role in this effort. The task force is offering four ways for us to provide our feedback.

  1. Anyone in our system may send comments to ictfcomments@iastate.edu from now until Oct. 29.
  2. Task force members will facilitate four community conversations across the state on Sept. 25, Sept. 28, Oct. 3 and Oct. 8. If you would like to participate in a conversation, please register at http://bit.ly/11131ictf. Six to 12 individuals may participate per session and these conversations will be offered on a first-come, first-served basis. If more than 12 people would like to participate at any one location, the task force will create a waiting list and determine whether another session can be offered.
  3. Each task force member has set aside one day to be available to meet by phone, Zoom or in-person with anyone in our system who would like to engage in an individual discussion. Please see the list of opportunities and contact the task force member to schedule a time to chat.
  4. Anyone in our system may anonymously complete an electronic survey, which will open in early October and close Oct. 29.

Please take a few minutes and participate, in whichever way works best for you. The more people who participate, the more valuable the task force’s report and recommendations will be for our organization.

Congratulations to our extension colleagues who received university awards on Sept. 14, including:

  • R.K. Bliss Extension Award, Jerry Chizek, Region 7 director.
  • Award for Distinguished Service in Extension, Beth Doran, beef field specialist.
  • Award for Outstanding Achievement in Extension or Professional Practice, Alison Robertson, professor and extension field pathologist.
  • Award for Early Achievement in Extension or Professional Practice, Lee Schulz, assistant professor and extension economist.
  • Professional and Scientific Outstanding New Professional Award, Sara Sprouse, human sciences specialist.
  • Award for Achievement in Economic Development in Iowa, CED Latino Business and Entrepreneurship Team – Lisa Bates, Himar Hernandez, Victor Oyervides, Jill Sokness, Scott Timm and Jon Wolseth.

We also congratulate Ron Cox, director of CIRAS, who received an award for Achievement in Economic Development in Iowa. Many of you may know Ron, since CIRAS had been part of ISU Extension and Outreach before becoming part of the Office of Economic Development and Industry Relations.

More notes

  • Wendy Wintersteen will be formally installed as president of Iowa State University Sept. 21 at Stephens Auditorium. Doors will open at 9:15 a.m. and the ceremony begins at 10:15 a.m. For those unable to attend in person, the installation will be livestreamed at www.iastate.edu.
  • Congratulations to Madison County, this year’s Cy Day Friday winner. They did a good job with community engagement and social media – check their Facebook page to see for yourself.
  • I’m visiting two regions this week: Sept. 17, Region 10; and Sept. 18, Region 11.

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

Provide your feedback

Update, October 22, 2018

The Internal Communications Task Force is offering four ways to provide feedback.

Survey: Anyone in our system may anonymously complete an electronic survey. The survey closes Oct. 29.

Email comments: Anyone in our system may send comments to ictfcomments@iastate.edu from now until Oct. 29.

Community Conversations

Two additional conversations have been scheduled. Registration Services will soon be reopening online registration at http://bit.ly/ictf11409.

Nov. 5, 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Room 3505, Memorial Union, Iowa State University, Ames

Nov. 9, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Hancock County Extension Office, 327 West 8th Street, Garner

Individual discussions: Contact the task force member directly to schedule a time to chat.

Oct 24: Andrea Nelson, nelsonar@iastate.edu, 515-294-8423
Oct 25: Ann Torbert, atorbert@iastate.edu, 319-377-9839
Oct 26: Debra Sellers, co-chair, dsellers@iastate.edu, 515-294-2312
Oct 29: Alex Merk, alexmerk@iastate.edu, 515-432-3882

 

Original message, September 14, 2018

The Internal Communications Task Force is offering four ways to provide feedback.

Email comments: Anyone in our system may send comments to ictfcomments@iastate.edu from now until Oct. 29.

Community Conversations

Sept. 25, 9:30 -11:30 a.m.
Cherokee County
209 Centennial Drive, Suite A, Cherokee, IA 51012-2243
Facilitators: Ben Pullen and Andrea Nelson

Sept 28, 9:30 -11:30 a.m.
Keokuk County
400 220th Ave. Suite A, Sigourney, IA 52591
Facilitators: Ann Torbert and Ross Wilburn

Oct. 3, 9:30 -11:30 a.m.
Delaware County
1417 N Franklin Street, Manchester, IA 52057
Facilitators: Debra Sellers and Alex Merk

Oct 8, 9:30 -11:30 a.m.
Cass County
805 West 10th Street, Atlantic, IA 50022
Facilitators: Ann Torbert and Terry Torneten

Individual discussions: Contact the task force member directly to schedule a time to chat.

Sept 26: Ross Wilburn, co-chair, wilburn@iastate.edu, 515-294-1354
Oct 15: Ben Pullen, bpullen@iastate.edu, 712-262-2264
Oct 17: Terry Torneten, ttorn@iastate.edu, 712-792-2364
Oct 24: Andrea Nelson, nelsonar@iastate.edu, 515-294-8423
Oct 25: Ann Torbert, atorbert@iastate.edu, 319-377-9839
Oct 26: Debra Sellers, co-chair, dsellers@iastate.edu, 515-294-2312
Oct 29: Alex Merk, alexmerk@iastate.edu, 515-432-3882

Task force member Mary Giese is not available for calls.

Survey: Anyone in our system may anonymously complete an electronic survey, which will open in early October and close Oct. 29.

A challenge for healthy living

John Lawrence’s message from Aug. 6, 2018

A lot of people recently completed a race across Iowa. No, I don’t mean RAGBRAI; that’s a ride and this year the route covered only 428 miles. I’m talking about a greater challenge that had more than 2,000 4-H’ers and staff crisscrossing the state (figuratively, anyway) and earning up to 3,000 “miles” as they made changes for healthier living – for themselves, their families and their communities. From Nov. 1, 2017, through June 30, 2018, these folks competed in the 4-H Race Across Iowa, a healthy living club challenge. Did you know?

  • The route connected a community in each extension region, starting in Region 1 and zigzagging across the state to Region 17, covering 1,400 miles (according to Google Maps). Clubs were challenged to earn at least 1,400 miles during the eight months of competition.
  • Clubs earned miles by setting goals and completing challenges at their monthly club meetings, gaining 75 miles for offering water, 100 miles for having fruit or vegetables as a snack, and 125 miles for coordinated or structured physical activity.
  • Bonus challenges involved other areas of wellness and well-being, including social (teambuilding), emotional (brain and mental health), and community outreach by engaging others in healthy living. For example, the KW Hustlers from Clarke County made potted gardens as gifts for food pantry patrons. Riverside Rockets from Fremont County were “Health Heroes” in a local parade, promoting the benefits of healthy choices to their community. Jackson Wise Owls from Jones County built raised garden beds for a care center so residents in wheelchairs could tend to the garden.
  • 4-H healthy living specialist Laura Liechty said 127 clubs and county extension office staff teams from 42 counties participated, and 71 reached at least 1,400 miles; 10 clubs reached the maximum 3,000 miles. All participating clubs are invited to a recognition event during 4-H Healthy Living Day Aug. 11 in the 4-H Exhibits Building at the Iowa State Fair.

4-H healthy living programming focuses not only on physical well-being practices, such as nutrition and exercise, but also encompasses all areas of wellness and well-being, as young people learn to make healthy life choices. This 4-H Race Across Iowa may have been imaginary, but the 4-H’ers’ enthusiasm for pledging their health to better living is real.

Interim 4-H leadership

Iowa 4-H has recently undergone a leadership transition. Andrea Nelson, director of Region 13, will serve as interim program leader while a national search is conducted for a permanent successor. Andrea has served in a variety of leadership roles with ISU Extension and Outreach in Polk County and Region 13. In addition to working directly with Iowa 4-H, she also served as county youth coordinator, where she managed a network of 200 adult volunteers to provide educational experiences for urban Polk County youth. Andrea brings more than 15 years of experience building working relationships with individuals and groups inside and outside of ISU Extension and Outreach. As a regional director, she has experience with both urban and rural counties and has served on numerous state committees. Under Andrea’s leadership, 4-H Youth Development at Iowa State University will continue its long and successful record of engaging young people across the state.

More notes

— John D. Lawrence
Iowa State University Vice President for Extension and Outreach

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