Every Little Bit Counts

I raise bees, then extract and sell their honey. I set my finances up so I can keep that money separate and use it to buy or replace equipment, hoping my hobby would support itself. If I run my apiary as a business, I would need an EIN (Employer Identification Number), and would need to keep good records of all my Income and Expenses. If I run my apiary as a hobby, I will still need to keep good records because I will need to report my income. Personally, I would keep track of my expenses even though they will not help me when filing my tax return. As much as I love bees and their honey, I want to track my expenses to make sure I am not losing too much money with this hobby.

An activity qualifies as a business if your primary purpose for engaging in the activity is for income or profit and you are involved in the activity with continuity and regularity. As a business, you will use a Schedule C to report your business activities (income and expenses) and determine what tax should be paid.  You will also be expected to pay self-employment tax quarterly.

As for me and my hobby, I will report my honey sales on a Schedule 1, line 8 of the Form 1040. The income won’t be subject to self-employment tax. On the downside, I may not be able to deduct expenses associated with my apiary.

So, you might be wondering now, “why report the income if I will have to pay taxes on it?” The first reason is that the law requires it. But in addition, there are at least two ways you can benefit from reporting the income.

  • If you have a lower income and are trying to make ends meet by working on the side, any earned income will be used to calculate the Earned Income Credit. Hobby income is not considered “earned income,” but if you report it on Schedule C as business income, then it is considered “earned income.” The earned income credit (EIC) is a tax credit that helps certain U.S. taxpayers with low earned incomes reduce the amount of tax owed on a dollar-for-dollar basis and may result in a refund to the taxpayer if the amount of the credit is greater than the amount of tax owed.  
  • Another benefit of reporting that income as earned income relates to Social Security. Remember that the monthly social security check you will receive in the future is based on current and past work and earnings history. Social Security retirement benefits are based on your average indexed monthly earnings (AIME) over your 35 highest-earning years.  You must have 40 quarters of at least $1410 (2020 rule) of earned income to qualify for Social Security.  Though the income from any job-on-the side is not enough to live on, it may be worth counting toward your 40 quarters and the calculations used to determine your future social security check.
Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Side-Hustle or Remotely Employed?

Many Americans have looked at new ways to make a living due to the pandemic undermining some traditional employment options. In a post-pandemic world, many job seekers will look towards the gig economy for answers.

The gig economy has been around for a while. You will have noticed these individuals in your community as self-employed individuals who mow lawns, deliver papers, provide childcare or work temporarily on your farm during harvest.  More recently, though, technology has removed a lot of barriers to high-paying, full-time and part-time remote employment.  Some of these jobs will require a degree while others require only the many skills and knowledge you already possess.

If you are looking into or already committed to earning a living in the gig economy, you will most likely find yourself in the following statistics.

  • 57.3 million people freelance in the U.S. It’s estimated that by 2027 there will be 86.5 million freelancers. (Upwork)
  • 36% of U.S. workers participate in the gig economy through either their primary or secondary jobs. (Gallup)
  • For 44% of gig workers, their work in the gig economy is their primary source of income. (Edison Research)
  • For 53% of gig workers aged 18-34, their work in the gig economy is their primary source of income. (Edison Research)
  • Gig employees are more likely to be young, with 38% of 18-34-year-olds being part of the gig economy. (Edison Research)

If becoming part of the gig economy is in your future, there are a few things to remember:

  • Keep on top of your paperwork
  • Set aside money for taxes
  • Contribute to an IRA
  • Make use of tax deductions.
Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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October Dates to Remember

Around this time of the year, I get a surge of individuals wanting me to prepare the previous year’s taxes. Then I remember…October 1 is the first day to file the FAFSA for college financial aid. Some colleges award scholarships and financial assistance on a first-come, first-served basis.

October Dates to Remember

October 15 is the new deadline to file your return if an extension was filed earlier this year.  If you filed for an extension on your taxes, October 15 is also the last day to contribute to a SEP IRA for self-employed people and small business owners.

Sometime in the fall, usually beginning in October or November, most employers hold their open enrollment period so you can change your employee benefits for the upcoming year. Review your health election, 401(k), and other employee benefits like life and disability insurance to see if they’re still meeting your needs. Do you have a flexible spending account (FSA)? Use those funds for qualified medical expenses or child care expenses by the end of the year. That money generally won’t roll over into next year. If you have a health savings account (HSA), that money will roll over and is tax-deferred, so consider maxing it.

November 1 is just around the corner and is the opening day of the federal health insurance marketplace enrollment for 2021 coverage. Iowa State University Extension has online class scheduled to help individuals choose wisely, the kind of health insurance they need.  The Smart Choice Basics class is intended for individuals that are 65 or younger and helps you select the right plan. Smart Choice Actions teaches individuals how to make wise use of the health insurance plan and intended for adults of any age.  Both workshops are 1 hour long at begin at 6:00 PM.  For dates and registration information, go to…

10/26/20  Smart Choice Basics

11/2/20  Smart Use

11/19/20 Smart Choice Basics

12/1/20  Smart Choice Basics   

12/8/20  Smart Use

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Debt? Make A Plan

The financial impact of COVID-19 has many people worrying about paying back borrowed money and wondering where to start. If you’d like help after reviewing the steps below, Iowa State University Extension Family Finance Specialists across the state are available for educational consultations that are free and confidential.

To get started, take 3 steps to manage your debt.

First, understand your debts. Make a chart or a list showing each debt, with who you owe, the amount you owe (including interest), and projected payoff date (if available). Having this clear view of your total debt picture will help you plan your approach.

Second, consider what the consequences are if you do not pay on time. In most cases, late payment or failure to pay will hurt your credit score. But in some cases, the consequences are more serious: for example, you may lose a service, such as water or electricity; or your vehicle may be repossessed. Considering the consequences will help you decide which bills to prioritize. NOTE: eventually it will be important to repay all your debts, but in the short term, it is advisable to prioritize those that are essential to your family’s well-being or to keep your job.

Third, plan a payment strategy that works best for you. After prioritizing the bills that are critical to your family’s well-being, you still may have several other debts to address – which of those should you pay first? You should, of course, keep paying the agreed-upon monthly payments if possible, but if you have extra money to put toward your debts, where should you start? Some people start by attacking the debt with the lowest balance – they are motivated by the idea of completely wiping out a debt so they have fewer bills to think about. You will actually save the most money by first focusing on the bill with the highest interest rate. To explore debt repayment options, check out PowerPay, a free and non-commercial debt calculator sponsored by Utah State University Extension.

Taking control of your debts starts with three steps: understanding it, being aware of consequences of not paying debt, and having a plan to reduce debts. It’s not easy to become debt-free, but for most consumers it can be accomplished with hard work and dedication. Be sure to contact your local ISU Extension financial educator if you’d like some assistance with sorting through your options.

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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National Preparedness Month

Considering all the catastrophes that Iowa is currently facing, it is fitting that the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has named September “National Preparedness Month.”  Between our ongoing struggle with COVID-19 and its associated challenges regarding health and employment, farm prices slumping over the past several years, and now the derecho, Iowa has certainly witnessed the importance of being prepared.  As many of us have learned, sometimes even the best laid plans are insufficient.  However, that caveat shouldn’t prevent any of us from taking steps to cushion ourselves from unexpected events. 

The 2020 theme for Preparedness Month is, “Disasters don’t wait.  Make your plan today.”  We learned this lesson acutely 2 weeks ago when we had only 30-40 minutes notice of our inland hurricane. 

So, what sort of things should we be preparing?  What elements should our plan contain?  DHS recommends taking concrete action steps each week in September.  Week 1 advises making a plan to communicate before, during, and after a disaster.  Week 2 suggests building a kit of emergency supplies to last your family a few days.  Week 3 asks that you know your situation including the types of disaster that may strike your area and checking on your insurance coverage.  For example, if you live in an area that might flood, it is better to find out if you have flood insurance before you are swimming in your basement than after.  Finally, Week 4 requests that you clearly share your plans with your children including strategies for reconnecting or communicating if you become separated in a disaster. 

As always, it is a good idea to have some degree of emergency savings readily available.  The conventional wisdom states that a person should save enough to cover 3-6 months of living expenses, but this can often total in the thousands of dollars.  If this number isn’t realistic for you at the moment, start small by setting a goal of putting aside $25 or $50 a month until you have a few hundred dollars on hand.  Being able to cover some smaller emergencies can help keep you from experiencing the increased stress of cascading troubles. 

If you find yourself struggling with your finances, you can always contact your local Extension office to get in touch with your Family Finance Specialist.  We are here to help and can offer 1-on-1 consultations.

Kalyn Cody photo

Guest Blogger, Kalyn Cody, Family Finance Field Specialist.

 

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Defining Financial Wellbeing: A New Way of Thinking

What comes to mind when you think about your financial wellbeing?  It may be paying bills on time, understanding your credit report, keeping financial accounts in balance, managing investments, or a long list of other financial tasks.  Although these items are important aspects of our financial lives, recent research has found that other key factors may be critical to our financial well-being

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau talked to consumers across the country to learn what financial wellbeing means to them.  Based on those interviews they found that four elements were mentioned:

• Feeling in control

• Capacity to absorb a financial shock

• On track to meet goals

• Flexibility to make choices

Financial wellbeing is not based on income level.  It’s more personal and based on satisfaction with your financial situation. Based on their research the CFPB developed a definition of wellbeing as having financial security and financial freedom of choice, in the present and in the future.

To measure your financial wellbeing, link to the wellbeing tool. Answer ten questions to get your score. You will not share any personal financial data. Steps to improve financial wellbeing are included.

Guest Blogger Phyllis Zalenski Family Finance Field Specialist…Providing Financial Management education for individuals and families including spending plans, budgeting for your needs, consumer decision-making, dealing with credit and debt, and planning for your future – savings, insurance, and retirement.

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Brushing – Another Scam

I find myself spending more time cleaning and pitching now that I am spending more time at home. In the toss-pile is a large collection of freebies that were handed out at fairs and tradeshow booths…stress balls, pens with weird gizmos attached, whistles, mini Frisbees, etc.  There is even a package or two of wildflower seeds that arrived in the mail promoting the planting of pollinator fields to save the bees.

The latest free thing that is arriving in the mail these days are UNIDENTIFIED seeds from an UNKNOWN source. Seeds that have not been ordered.  They are arriving mostly from China and Uzbekistan. This is of great concern to the USDA and the State Departments of Agriculture.  These seeds could be an invasive plant that does not currently exist in the US or they may contain seed-borne diseases that do not exist in the US. Some packages have an unknown seed treatment that could be dangerous to human health.

Most likely, these packages are part of a BRUSHING scheme….fake orders used in e-commerce to boost a seller’s rating. Because a shipment has to take place to make an order valid, sellers may ship an empty box or some cheap item. These fake orders can boost the seller’s rating, which can make it more likely that their item will appear at the top of search results on e-commerce sites.

What the USDA and the State Departments of Ag want you to do is…

– Do not plant the seeds

– Do not open the packets

– Do not eat the seed.

– Retain the packages and contact the IDALS (515.281.5321 – Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship) or USDA (515.251.4083 – US Department of Agriculture) for further instructions.

More information from our ISU agriculture colleagues and from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship.

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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ID Theft Protection

Lately I find myself asking my husband if he got the mail because there is not the usual pile waiting for me on the kitchen table. Then I started to wonder if he had already sorted and tossed the junk. Nope! It is not my imagination…there truly is a lot less junk mail these days since COVID 19 began. So much less that it has created a collapse in mail volume. The decline could be as much as 60% by the end of the year, which is bad news for the US Postal Service…considering it has been struggling for about 14 years.

On the other hand,…the supply of junk e-mail continues to grow at a steady pace.  It has even creeped into my text messages. Some emails and text messages look very authentic so, it is important to be alert to scammers. Be wary of messages requesting immediate action. Poor grammar and spelling errors are a good indication the email is fraudulent.

Nearly all e-businesses have a process in place for reporting such emails and texts that are made to look like they are coming from their legitimate company…Facebook, Amazon, etc. You can do a quick search and find how best to notify businesses when you receive messages from scammers; examples include phish@facebook.com, stop-spoofing@amazon.com, spam@uspis.gov. You will probably get an auto-reply indicating that your message was received and appreciated but don’t expect the company to personally reply to your email.

If you are concerned about data breaches or identity theft, you may be considering signing up for identity theft protection services. Before you enroll, it is important to weigh the costs and benefits of various types of services. You also can compare them with free and low-cost services. The federal government’s IdentityTheft.gov website provides free personal recovery plans and step-by-step guidance to help identity theft victims recover.

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Food Assistance and Increased Options

With job losses skyrocketing because of the coronavirus pandemic, hunger is a growing issue for many Iowans. To help alleviate some of the stress, the Department of Human Services requested an addendum to the state plan for The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). The addendum has allowed for increased access to food distribution to address food insecurity related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Iowans who qualify for food assistance can receive increased funds – and in April and May, that total monthly benefit was $646 for a family of four!

Iowans who are in need of food should call 2-1-1 or contact their local food bank to find TEFAP providers in their area. There are also increased options to use food assistance funds to purchase food online. Some retailers like Walmart and Amazon now accept Electronic Benefit Transfers (EBT) and Amazon is able to deliver to all zip codes in Iowa.

The fastest and easiest way to apply for benefits is to complete the online application located at: https://www.dhs.iowa.gov/how-to-apply. If you don’t already have Food Assistance benefits, you can apply anytime in June and if you are eligible, you will get the full monthly maximum amount of benefits for your household size.

Food pantries might be another option to make ends meet during this crisis. Food pantries are permanent sites that store and distribute groceries to people in need. They are commonly located at community centers, faith based organizations or other sites. Many food pantries have set distribution hours, so it’s best to call before you visit. You can check the website FoodPantries.org for local pantries near you.

Many communities in Iowa offer Mobile Pantries. These might be monthly, bimonthly or quarterly food distributions and are often operated by the Food Bank of Iowa. Community partners throughout Iowa set up these farmers market-style distributions. You can check mobile pantry schedule for a list of all our mobile pantries, or find a mobile pantry near you on the food resources map.

The summer food service program (SFSP), administered by the Iowa Department of Education, offers nutritious meals and snacks to school children ages 18 and under during the summer months. You can check the Iowa Department of Education website for local information, https://www.educateiowa.gov/pk-12/nutrition-programs/summer-food-service-program

Soup Kitchens and Meal Sites prepare and serve meals to people in need on a regular basis. Most soup kitchens and meal sites have set meal times on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis so again, be sure to call before you visit.

If you are farm family, whose operation has been directly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic there is assistance available through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program. This program can provide direct relief to producers who have faced price declines and additional marketing costs due to COVID-19. The USDA is accepting applications through August 28, 2020, more information can be found at https://www.farmers.gov/coronavirus.

Guest Blogger: Mary Weinand
Family Finance Field Specialist
Iowa State University Extension
Guest Blogger
Mary Weinand
Family Finance Field Specialist
Iowa State University Extension and Outreach
Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Juggle—Stop—and Slide Expenses

Juggle—Stop—and Slide your personal expenses throughthis COVID-19 global pandemic using tools, actions and strategies to protect your family.

Juggle– Put money you would have normally spent for things (e.g., personal care, commuting costs and child care) toward other essential bills. Rework your budget and reallocate money you are not currently spending.  We shifted money not spent on gas and eating out. Those dollars are now budgeted for extra costs for an unplanned internet upgrade. Consider online budget tools like this one from the University of Wisconsin.

Stop- Take immediate action to stop all excess spending. Ask: “How can we reduce spending?”

  • Substitute a less costly item
  • Conserve resources and avoid waste
  • Cooperate with others by trading or sharing resources
  • Save money if we do it ourselves
  • Do without

These ideas and more are available at the University of Minnesota’s “Strategies for Spending Less” page. You’ll find other resources on ISU Extension’s Finding Answers Now page

Slide- Take advantage of Covid19 Special offers and slide a portion of the bill forward.

Our mobile phone carrier will not charge a late fee or terminate service through June 30. To qualify due to hardship a short online form is required.   Iowa utility providers (i.e. energy and water) may provide relief payment options, assistance programs, and low-cost steps for customers according to the Iowa Utility Board.  https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/pages/faqs#Utilities

Free and confidential consultations with ISU Extension financial educators are available to all Iowa residents. We can provide tools and information to help you revise budgets, prioritize spending and link to community resources. 

Find your local Extension educator or contact Iowa Concern 800-447-1985 for information. Consider our free booklet: “Planning to $tay Ahead”  English and Spanish https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/5523

Carol Ehlers

Guest Blogger: Carol Ehlers,
Human Sciences Specialist in Family Finance

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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