Buy Now, Pay Later?

Recently I was in the store, and while walking in the aisle, I saw a sign saying “ Buy now and pay later – see the associate for details.” I might expect to see signs like that during winter holiday shopping, but not in the spring!

First, what is Buy Now Pay Later? Basically it’s an option that lets consumers finance their purchase by making small payments each month, without paying any interest. Example: purchase an air fryer for $125 by paying $25 at the time of purchase and promising four future payments of $25 (perhaps monthly or bi-weekly).

According to a 2021 survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis, people chose Buy Now, Pay Later for five main reasons, listed below in order of preference.

  1. The largest group (78%) stated that it was more convenient for them.
  2. The second reason given was that the consumers did not want use their credit card. Even though they could have purchased the product with a credit card, they feel they were better off without charging it to their credit card.
  3. The next reason was that it was the only way they could afford the product. This is certainly understandable for consumers who are living paycheck to paycheck on a tight budget. Any large purchase would constrain their budget; small payments make the purchase possible.
  4. Some people did some analysis to compare payment options, and concluded that “buy now, pay later” was the least-costly payment option available to them.
  5. Lastly, for some consumers “buy now, pay later” was the only payment method they had – they did not have checking accounts or credit cards available, and worked strictly with cash.  

It is important to point out that even though “Buy Now, Pay Later” does not charge a fee to the consumer, it is not truly free. The retailer offers it in cooperation with an outside finance company, which charges the retailer a fee for the service. Some retailers expect to see increased sales that will make up for the added cost; other retailers may pass the cost on to the consumer in the form of higher prices.

Budgeting for large purchases requires some planning. For those who do not have savings or credit available to cover the cost of a large purchase, Buy Now Pay Later may prove to be a very helpful option, enabling them to acquire higher-cost items they would not otherwise have been able to afford.

A caution: what if I buy an air fryer today (needing $25 payments), and a bike next week (with payments of $40) and a chainsaw the next week ($20 payments)?  Next month I’ll have a bunch of unusual payments to make. If it seems “easy” to make large purchases, consumers may make several purchases within a few weeks and find themselves overcommitted. Like all tools, “Buy Now, Pay Later” can be useful, as long as we use them carefully!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Credit Repair? Avoid scams

Your credit history can determine whether you get a loan, get credit, insurance or a home. Some employers also may look at your credit history. A rule of thumb is if you have a good credit history, you will pay lower interest when borrowing money.

Guest Blogger Sandra McKinnon

If you have negative information in your credit history, most of it will stay on your credit report for seven years, and bankruptcy information will stay on for 10 years. That negative information, if it is true, cannot be removed. It simply takes time for it to go away.

A credit repair company can help you investigate mistakes on your credit report, but they cannot remove negative information. So, be on the lookout for a company that says they can.

If you choose to work with a credit repair company, do not pay before they help you. This could mean a scam. Other ways of knowing you may be dealing with a scam are if they tell you:

  • Not to contact the credit bureaus directly
  • To dispute information in your credit report you know is accurate
  • To lie on your applications for credit or a loan

If you think you may have been scammed by a credit repair company, report it to the Federal Trade Commission at ReportFraud.ftc.gov and your state attorney general’s office. In Iowa, the Attorney General may be reached toll free 1-888-777-4590 or visit https://www.iowaattorneygeneral.gov/.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau offers information on how to seek help with problem credit. They also offer additional information on credit repair scams.

Sandra McKinnon is a Human Sciences specialist in Family Wellbeing with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, serving southwest Iowa.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Money Smart Holiday Shopping

With the approach of the annual event known as Black Friday, guest blogger Carol Ehlers offers tips to help us all be smart about our holiday shopping!

This year, holiday shoppers are planning on spending more money, shopping earlier and trying new retailers. According to TransUnion’s 2021 Consumer Holiday Shopping Report more than 1 in 3 holiday shoppers (36%) plan on spending more this year. Last year’s average American ran up holiday spending debt to $1,381 with almost 8 in 10 unable to pay it off by the end of January. So, for every $5 spent trying to pay off credit card debt, consumers give away $1 to the credit card companies. https://www.consolidatedcredit.org/webinars-and-seminars/holiday-survival-guide-webinar/

Holiday spending is a common way for people to land themselves in debt and financial stress. Some find themselves in trouble by rationalizing big spending and incurring debt during the holidays. This leads to paying for holiday spending well into the next year. Money Smart Holiday Sending can give you confidence to manage your money and resources throughout the season and into the new year. Below are three key tips for being Money Smart during the holiday season:

  • Create a holiday budget. Figure out how much you can afford to spend this holiday season. Financial planners recommend spending less than 1.5 percent of your annual income on holiday expenses. An example: for someone with $35,000 gross income that amounts to a $525 limit for holiday spending. If you haven’t saved that much, look for ways to cut back.
  • Make a List-check it twice. Make a detailed gift list with a set amount to spend, keeping track of what is spent. Research indicates consumers reduce their food expense by 25-30% by using a shopping list and this principle applies to other holiday spending categories.
  • Use Cash-Not Credit.  One way to do this is the envelope method. Make one envelope for each person and only put in what you plan to spend. If credit is necessary, charge only the amount that you can safely repay in a few months. Limit your charges to one card with the lowest interest rate and fees. Keep all receipts.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Confused about recent Federal Student Loan changes? Look no further!

If the Federal Student Loan changes over the past 18 months weren’t confusing enough, the U.S. Department of Education recently announced several more that may leave you wondering how you are affected this time around. The original COVID-19 Emergency Relief measures are tentatively set to expire on January 31, 2022, but the new provisions are either permanent, expire on October 31, 2022, and/or impact a smaller group of borrowers:

  • On August 20, the U.S. Department of Education announced that eligible Servicemembers would automatically, and retroactively, receive a 0% interest-rate benefit if they deployed to areas qualifying for imminent danger or hostile fire pay. This is not a new benefit; however, Servicemembers previously needed to submit a form, with supporting documentation, to find out if their loans and deployment qualified for the 0% interest waiver. 
  • Several updates have been made over the past few months regarding Federal Student Loan Servicers. PHEAA (FedLoan Servicing), Granite State, and Navient will no longer service U.S Dept of Ed-owned loans when their contract expires. Current borrowers will receive numerous notifications throughout the loan transfer process. Watch for those notifications: be sure to save the information or respond as requested.
  • The often-troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program is receiving a giant makeover. Some of the provisions are temporary, while some remain unchanged. Regardless, these changes are significant and remain in effect until October 31, 2022. 

Are you still unsure of how these changes affect you? Contact an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Financial Educator today! 

The information provided is educational in nature to help you make your own informed decisions and is not intended to substitute for professional advice or serve as an endorsement of any financial product or service. Consult with licensed professionals prior to implementing any of the information provided to determine the course of action is best for you. 

Ryan Stuart is a Human Sciences Specialist, Family Wellbeing, with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Ryan will be joining the regular blog team soon, so watch for more posts from him.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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URGENT – Mortgage Forbearance Deadlines this Week!

We mentioned Mortgage Forbearance earlier as a helpful tool for homeowners who are having trouble with their mortgage payments. Forbearance is when your mortgage servicer or lender allows you to pause or reduce your mortgage payments for a limited time while you build back your finances. The CARES Act (passed back in April of 2020) required that when a mortgage is backed by a Federal Agency, the borrower is automatically eligible for 3-6 months of forbearance if they are experiencing financial hardship resulting (directly OR indirectly) from COVID-19. Forbearance creates a helpful reprieve for struggling families.

The deadline to apply for forbearance under the CARES Act is September 30, 2021 IF your mortgage is backed by HUD/FHA, USDA, or the VA! That means NOW is the time for action. NOTE: if your loan is backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, there is not currently a deadline for requesting an initial forbearance.

Not Sure About Your Mortgage? Contact your mortgage company and ask them about your mortgage — asked if was backed by any of the agencies listed above. It that answer is “yes,” and if you are struggling with payments and bills, apply right away: ask your mortgage company to provide the needed application materials.

What does it mean to have your mortgage “backed” by a government agency? That simply means that when you bought your home, you qualified for special terms – often a lower down payment, reduced fees, or preferential interest rate thanks to a government program. I remember that when I bought my first house it was an FHA Loan; many first-time homebuyers qualify for special terms, and others do as well. If you are not sure, there is no harm in asking!

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau provides more information about forbearance. Financial assistance for homeowners at imminent risk of foreclosure may be available as well; the Iowa Finance Authority provides more information, about help that is currently available, and notes that more assistance, authorized under the American Rescue Plan Act, will be available within the next several months.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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College Students and Money: Discretionary spending adds up

This is the fourth in a series this week about financial issues faced by students in college and trade schools. Yesterday’s post discussed discretionary spending. Today we share an example that can help students as they consider how much they will spend on discretionary items.

Suppose Student A and Student B are financially identical, except Student A spends $450 a month on discretionary spending and Student B spends $150 a month. Student A spends $300/month more on discretionary expenses through four years of college (I’m including summers too, since most students continue having discretionary spending through the summer). When four years are over, suppose Student B has total student loan balance of $20,000. Since they were identical except for discretionary spending, that means Student A’s total student loan debt will be $34,400, or $14,400 more than Student B.

The current interest rate on federal student loans is 3.73% per year. Let’s suppose they repay their loans using the standard 10-year repayment plan, although there are other plans available with longer repayment terms and lower monthly payments. On the 10-year plan, Student B will pay $200/month. Student A, on the other hand, will pay $345/month. 

As fresh college graduates, will Student A be ready to deal with a monthly loan payment of $345, instead of a payment of $200? That extra $145 student loan payment is the consequence of their extra college spending; extra spending during college limits their options in the future. Understanding the consequences of their actions helps students make informed decisions they can live with in the long run.

What’s the “right” decision on discretionary spending? Only the student can decide. I have heard of college juniors and seniors who look back on their spending in their first one or two years of school and regret it. Of course there may be others who look back at how little they spent and wish they had let themselves have a little more fun.

When considering how much total educational debt you are willing to accumulate, consider two rules:

  • Borrow as little as you can. This is in bold, because I think of this as the “golden rule” about student debt. This rule applies in virtually every situation, and is above any other rules.
  • Avoid borrowing more (total) than your expected first year’s salary. This is a commonly accepted “rule of thumb.” Example: if you hope to start out as a civil engineer making $60,000, then $60,000 should be the MAXIMUM you are willing to borrow for your education.
    Notice: this doesn’t mean you should go ahead and spend extra because “you can afford” to borrow $60,000. The golden rule is above all other rules – no matter what, it is wise to borrow as little as you can.

Tomorrow – the last in our series “College Students and Money.” Do you think the subject of credit cards will come up?

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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College Students and Money: Be Smart about Student Loans

This is the second in a series. Yesterday’s post offered guidance on effective ways for parents to talk to their young adult children about school-related financial issues.

Most college students use student loans to help pay for their education. There are still some families (including moderate-income families) whose children complete college without any loans — through a combination of money saved up over the years, plus scholarships and earnings from a job — but that is not the norm. So if you are expecting to rely on student loans, you are pretty typical.

While student loans create valuable opportunities, they can contribute to problems if they feel like “easy money.” It seems easy to some students: just sign the paper, and the money is yours. It is years later (or even decades later), as they repay the loans, when some students understand that loans are far from “easy money.” Students start out a step ahead if they recognize that reality from the get-go.

Two key strategies exist for reducing the “payback pain” of student loans:

  • borrow less – as little as you can
  • Choose your loans wisely. (Yes, you have choices — shop around!)
    Here are some tips to get you started with that.

In general, Federal Student Loans are the most desirable type – low fixed interest rates, and a range of repayment options. Best of all are Federal subsidized student loans, available to some students based on need. Subsidized means the government pays the interest for you for as long as you are a student (more than half time); that’s a huge bonus. Example: a student who borrows $5,000/year for 4 years with a subsidized loan will have a starting loan balance of $20,000 when they graduate. By contrast, if that was an unsubsidized loan, interest would accrue even while they are still in school. If the interest rate is 4%, their starting loan balance when they graduate would be $22,081, because of the interest charged for those four years of borrowing.

A student’s eligibility for Federal Student Loans, and the maximum amount they can borrow, is determined by their financial aid application (FAFSA), and is part of their financial aid offer from the school, which may also include scholarships and grants. When students need to borrow more than they are eligible for in Federal loans, that is where the shopping around comes in.

Private student loans are offered by private lenders. In general, interest rates are likely to be higher than Federal loans, and the rates are usually variable. You might start out with a low interest rate, but if prevailing interest rates rise, the rate on your loan will probably go up, as well. In some cases, borrowers with excellent credit histories and ability to repay may be offered lower interest rates. A typical student, with little to no credit history, will likely need a co-signer. All of these variables point to the reasons why it is valuable to shop around for student loans. Checking a minimum of three lenders is always recommended.

A third option for families to consider is the Parent PLUS Loan. These are available only to biological or adoptive parents of dependent students; students must be enrolled in school at least half-time. The parents must be credit eligible, although there is a process through the Department of Education by which parents can be approved even with poor credit histories, depending on the reasons or extenuating circumstances contributing to that poor credit score. Parents are responsible for repayment; that means parents must consider their entire financial picture, including their age and retirement plans, the needs of other children, and their ability to maintain satisfactory lifestyle while repaying a loan. These are Federal Loans, administered through the Dept of Education.

As with any important consumer decision, it is critical to use reliable information. Many of the best sources of information are provided by the United States government, beginning with the umbrella website www.studentaid.gov. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) also offers numerous resources to help with decision-making, including a simple one-page guide to student loans and a very helpful student loan web page. Additionally, another one-page tool helps students make informed choices about bank accounts.

The CFPB offers another comprehensive planning tool titled: Your Financial Path to Graduation. The tool is easy to use, and takes a student step by step through a fairly complete look at the sources of money they have available to cover their college expenses, AND a personalized look at what they can expect those expenses to be. It helps students and families consider various options, and gives them a forecast of what their situation might be by the time they graduate, including what their total debt levels might be and what starting salary they might reasonably expect. I tested it out with a hypothetical student situation, and I thought it could be very helpful – I encourage you to try it!

This is the second in a series this week on student financial readiness for college. Next up: discretionary expenses.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Money Guidance via Podcast

graduates

Targeting those in college or planning for college, the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently launched a podcast called Financial inTuition. The six episodes currently available are divided into two categories: three episodes focused on student loans, and three on basic money management skills with a focus on issues faced by students.

Each episode includes an interview with either an expert or a consumer with first-hand experience. It’s always helpful to learn from other people’s experience!

The podcast is available free wherever you get your podcasts, OR directly from the CFPB website. It is part of a broader set of resources targeting students and young adults on topics like paying for college (including information about student loans and the GI Bill), and money management information for economically-vulnerable consumers (which includes most young adults just starting out) on topics like building credit access and finding money to save. They also provide materials for both youth educators and adult educators.

Check out these resources for yourself OR share them with someone you care about!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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There’s Still Time to Ask for Mortgage Help

COVID-19 has reduced the incomes of SO many Iowans, making basic survival harder. If you are worried about protecting your home if you are unable to make your mortgage payments, you may have options – but you won’t know unless you ask! Watch this video from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for the facts you need to know about mortgage forbearance.

Woman standing in lobby with text "COVID-19 Mortgage Relief: 4 Things to Know"

The CARES Act requires that consumers be offered at least 180 days “forbearance” if their mortgage is backed by a federal agency (FHA, VA, USDA, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac). Many lenders are also making forbearance available for privately-backed loans. You will eventually need to make up for the missed payments, but you will have some time to catch up. Beware of any housing relief offers that require you to pay a fee up front – those are likely scams.

For more information about housing relief options, visit cfpb.gov/housing. For help sorting through your options on a wide range of financial issues, request an individual consultation with one of our ISU Extension family finance specialists.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Pandemic-Induced Goals?

The current period of job loss and reduced income has affected people in different ways. The result? Different households face different financial challenges at this point. Whatever your situation, now is s a good time to assess your financial situation, evaluate your priorities, and take steps to improve your situation as necessary. If you’d like some help, your local ISU Extension financial educator is available to work with you, providing free, non-commercial information and a sounding board as you make your plans.

  1. Some of you have been living with seriously reduced income – and still are. Your task has been to find every possible way to reduce your expenses and/or find new income and make use of new resources, including public assistance if you qualify. You must communicate with all of your creditors, but avoid making promises you cannot keep. If returning to something like normal looks unlikely, you may need to consider major lifestyle changes.
  2. Some of you lost income for a while, but are now back to an income you can live on. It is likely that you got behind on bills, built up credit card debt, and/or depleted your savings during your crisis. Strong focus on repaying those debts and building up emergency savings will get you ready in case of an unexpected expense or another loss of income. Careful examination of your spending choices will help you regain equilibrium and then build a strong cushion.
  3. Others of you had stable income, but have realized that if you did lose income, you would be in a very difficult spot. Facing the reality that you lack basic financial security can motivate you to build up savings and pay down debt. Start by cutting your living expenses so that your regular monthly expenses are 10-25% less than your income. Putting the extra funds toward savings and expedited debt payment will build you a cushion that will bring peace of mind and make your life easier if/when hardship strikes.
  4. Still others have stable income, and have felt secure that even if you did have a cutback, you would be okay. In your case there is no obvious need for change, but it’s wise to maintain control of your finances through good planning. You may wish to build an even stronger savings cushion, after seeing others struggle with lost income for six months or longer. As you build savings, seek out accounts that pay slightly higher interest while still providing ready access to your funds.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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