Time Management

Time and money are two important resources. If you want to learn what is truly most important to you, look at how you spend those two limited resources. 

Earlier this month, I attended a workshop where the Time Management Matrix was shared.  I remember having seen it a long time ago but had not thought about it or made a conscious effort to apply the principle.  In a nutshell, you have a box divided into fourths.  The upper left quadrant is tasks that are urgent AND important.  The upper right quadrant are tasks that are important but NOT urgent.  Lower left is “urgent / not important” and lower right is “not urgent / not important.”  To be effective and productive, you want to spend most of your time in the upper boxes. Out of curiosity, I did a personal check-up…placing the tasks I completed over the past few days into the matrix. It became obvious that I would benefit if I were a little more intentional in planning how to use my time.

Criteria other than TIME must be used to measure productivity and value of a remote employee.  It not possible for a supervisor to constantly watch their employee, especially virtually.  For remote workers, employee evaluations are usually based on the quality and reliability of their work; in other words, the focus is on RESULTS-BASED work criteria.  Productivity may be monitored by tracking time, tasks, or deliverables.

To effectively manage time, you will need to identify your work priorities, estimate the time needed to accomplish tasks, organize your schedule, follow through with completing your tasks, and track and report your progress as your situation requires.  You will also be expected to effectively adjust your schedule and processes as priorities shift. 

The Remote Work Certificate Course goes into great detail on how to best manage your time when working remotely; it shares tools that are currently used to track and report RESULT-BASED work performance…all things that would benefit ALL employees, not just the remote worker. Could you benefit by improving your time-management skills? For more information or to enroll in the next class, visit https://www.extension.iastate.edu/humansciences/remote-work .

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Inflation: Choose Your Changes

Someone asked me a couple weeks ago whether I had written a blog post yet on inflation, which has certainly been in the news lately. My first thought was “Well no – there’s nothing we can do about inflation, and we can’t foresee the future… so what could I write?” It dawned on me later that in fact there ARE some points I can share to help us all deal with higher prices.

If prices go up and our income doesn’t increase enough to keep pace, it’s a lot like getting a pay cut. Our normal patterns of spending and saving no longer work – something has to change. For some people the change involves minor sacrifice – perhaps eating out fewer times a week, or at less-expensive restaurants. For other people, higher prices may mean much more challenging changes.  The good news is that at least YOU are the one who gets to decide what changes to make. Ideas for making the changes less painful:

  1. You may be able to use non-monetary resources to meet some of your needs. For example, if you usually buy birthday cakes for your family, perhaps you can make them instead. OR perhaps you have a friend who could make the cake in exchange for you watching her children one Saturday.  Think about ways in which you can use your own time and energy and skills to accomplish things that you usually pay for. And remember that your friends also have skills they may be willing to share. Common examples include: cooking from scratch rather than using convenience foods, shoveling your own snow instead of paying someone else, learning to cut family members’ hair to avoid the cost of regular haircuts, giving gift certificates for your time and talent (I’ll bake you a pie!) in place of purchased gifts.
  2. Make use of community resources that are available. Even if you have never before applied for energy assistance or used the free tax preparation available in your community, when times are tight, using these services and others can make a big difference.
  3. Careful shopping can make limited funds stretch further. Even with increased prices, retailers still have sales, and generics are still less expensive than brand names. Sometimes changing where we shop and what brand we buy makes it possible to save money even without severely cutting back our shopping list.
  4. When the reality is that we are going to need to “do without” something, we can consider our priorities and choose what to keep and what to give up. One person might “give up” their morning stop at a coffee shop, so they could continue to pay for their streaming services or premium cable; another person might make the opposite choice.
    Recognizing that we have a choice can help our attitude: we don’t “have to” give up anything; instead, we choose what to give up. For example, instead of feeling deprived about not going out for lunch every day, we can feel proud about bringing lunch to work so that we can continue to use funds for something more important.

This short list is only a starting point. We would love to have you share your strategies for dealing with inflation! Please share in the comments!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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It’s More Than Who You Know

A friend was visiting with a member of her family during a recent gathering.  They told my friend about a job opening at their workplace.  It was a remote job…a work from home opportunity with good pay and benefits. The next day, my friend sent in her resume, and two days later she had an interview.

In the past month I have: referred a couple of friends to job openings I knew about; received a phone call regarding someone who used me as a reference when they applied for a job; and met with a graduate of the Remote Work Certificate Course to help her prepare for an interview.

In the Remote Work Certificate course, offered through Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, many strategies are taught to build up your connections, because connections increase your chance of landing a good job. One of those strategies is social media, which can reach a lot of people with little time or effort. The most fruitful connections, however, will most likely be your direct personal connections.  You do not get referred if you do not connect with someone in a way that makes them trust you enough to refer you. Personally, in every job I’ve had except my first job, I had a personal connection that made the interview possible. Connections matter!

Important reminder: while the connections help you find the opportunities, and may help you land the interview, you still have to do your homework and work hard in preparing for the interview.

If you have a thirst for knowledge, know your strengths and want to work on them, and are thinking about getting into the remote workforce, check out the Remote Work Certificate course.  The next class begins January 4…application deadline is December 29.

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Thanks Giving: Give Wisely and Deduct

The Thanksgiving holiday is a time to stop and really notice how much we have to be thankful for. Many people take that gratitude a step further by sharing from what we have; they take their “thanks” and turn it toward “giving” to worthy charities this time of year. The arrival of “Giving Tuesday” next week also prompts people to give.

An article from the Iowa Attorney General’s office this week (see item 5 in the article) reminds us of steps to ensure we give wisely. Careless gifts may end up in the hands of criminals OR of organizations that do not use funds wisely. One way to make sure your money is used well for the cause you care about is to give to a local organization that has a good reputation. When giving to national organizations, you can make sure they are well-managed by checking one or more of these reputable charity rating sites: BBB Wise Giving AllianceCharity NavigatorCharityWatch, and GuideStar. The article offers more suggestions as well.

Another way to give wisely is to take the tax deduction for which you are eligible! Some people may say, “I don’t give to charity just for tax purposes – I give because I care!” That’s great. But if you take the tax deduction, and it reduces your tax bill (or increases your refund), then you have MORE money to give! Now that is wise giving!

The tax code allows us to deduct (subtract) our charitable gifts from our income before the tax is calculated. The government created that deduction to encourage us to give. By taking the deduction, and potentially having more to give, we are contributing to the valuable American habit of supporting worthwhile causes. There are two ways to deduct your charitable contributions:

  1. By “Itemizing” your deductions on Schedule A of your tax return. This is great for people who have enough deductions to be higher than the “standard” deduction allowed according to family type. For a single individual, that standard deduction is $12,550; for a married couple, it’s $25,100. Your tax preparer can help you know if this is advantageous for you.
    Good news! Even if you are better off with the standard deduction, a new law lets you deduct some 2021 giving anyway!
  2. Thanks to some of the COVID-relief legislation passed in 2020 and 2021, taxpayers can take a deduction for charitable contributions in 2021 even if they don’t itemize deductions! An individual tax filer can deduct up to $300 of monetary contributions to qualifying charities; for married couples filing jointly, that figure is $600.

In the midst of your Thanksgiving celebration, I encourage you to think about any charitable giving you might want to do, and then when you make the gift(s), be sure to keep the receipt for tax purposes! Plan now for #GivingTuesday and beyond!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Money Smart Holiday Shopping

With the approach of the annual event known as Black Friday, guest blogger Carol Ehlers offers tips to help us all be smart about our holiday shopping!

This year, holiday shoppers are planning on spending more money, shopping earlier and trying new retailers. According to TransUnion’s 2021 Consumer Holiday Shopping Report more than 1 in 3 holiday shoppers (36%) plan on spending more this year. Last year’s average American ran up holiday spending debt to $1,381 with almost 8 in 10 unable to pay it off by the end of January. So, for every $5 spent trying to pay off credit card debt, consumers give away $1 to the credit card companies. https://www.consolidatedcredit.org/webinars-and-seminars/holiday-survival-guide-webinar/

Holiday spending is a common way for people to land themselves in debt and financial stress. Some find themselves in trouble by rationalizing big spending and incurring debt during the holidays. This leads to paying for holiday spending well into the next year. Money Smart Holiday Sending can give you confidence to manage your money and resources throughout the season and into the new year. Below are three key tips for being Money Smart during the holiday season:

  • Create a holiday budget. Figure out how much you can afford to spend this holiday season. Financial planners recommend spending less than 1.5 percent of your annual income on holiday expenses. An example: for someone with $35,000 gross income that amounts to a $525 limit for holiday spending. If you haven’t saved that much, look for ways to cut back.
  • Make a List-check it twice. Make a detailed gift list with a set amount to spend, keeping track of what is spent. Research indicates consumers reduce their food expense by 25-30% by using a shopping list and this principle applies to other holiday spending categories.
  • Use Cash-Not Credit.  One way to do this is the envelope method. Make one envelope for each person and only put in what you plan to spend. If credit is necessary, charge only the amount that you can safely repay in a few months. Limit your charges to one card with the lowest interest rate and fees. Keep all receipts.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Confused about recent Federal Student Loan changes? Look no further!

If the Federal Student Loan changes over the past 18 months weren’t confusing enough, the U.S. Department of Education recently announced several more that may leave you wondering how you are affected this time around. The original COVID-19 Emergency Relief measures are tentatively set to expire on January 31, 2022, but the new provisions are either permanent, expire on October 31, 2022, and/or impact a smaller group of borrowers:

  • On August 20, the U.S. Department of Education announced that eligible Servicemembers would automatically, and retroactively, receive a 0% interest-rate benefit if they deployed to areas qualifying for imminent danger or hostile fire pay. This is not a new benefit; however, Servicemembers previously needed to submit a form, with supporting documentation, to find out if their loans and deployment qualified for the 0% interest waiver. 
  • Several updates have been made over the past few months regarding Federal Student Loan Servicers. PHEAA (FedLoan Servicing), Granite State, and Navient will no longer service U.S Dept of Ed-owned loans when their contract expires. Current borrowers will receive numerous notifications throughout the loan transfer process. Watch for those notifications: be sure to save the information or respond as requested.
  • The often-troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program is receiving a giant makeover. Some of the provisions are temporary, while some remain unchanged. Regardless, these changes are significant and remain in effect until October 31, 2022. 

Are you still unsure of how these changes affect you? Contact an Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Financial Educator today! 

The information provided is educational in nature to help you make your own informed decisions and is not intended to substitute for professional advice or serve as an endorsement of any financial product or service. Consult with licensed professionals prior to implementing any of the information provided to determine the course of action is best for you. 

Ryan Stuart is a Human Sciences Specialist, Family Wellbeing, with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Ryan will be joining the regular blog team soon, so watch for more posts from him.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Getting a Leg Up

 

Next week, it will be 2 years since I took the Remote Work Certificate Course. It was not until I took this class that I realized that I have been working in a REMOTE job for more than 20 years now…meaning that I work from a remote site away from my employer’s headquarter.  As a specialist working for Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, I am house in a county office and serve multiple regions, coming to the ISU campus only three or four times a year.  We had been ZOOMing long before COVID hit, working, meeting, teach and hosting educational programs statewide and beyond.

It turns out that more than half of all U.S. job are remote work.  I was surprised to learn that there are more workers over the age of 40 than under 40 working remotely…I thought remote work would mostly appeal to the younger generation. In reality, 86% of the US workforce WANTS to work from home. The bad news is…currently only 3% of NEW job posts are transparently advertised as remote work.  It is for this reason that Iowa State University Extension and Outreach offers the Remote Work Certificate Course.  At the end of the month-long course, participants can schedule time with a career coach for assistance in creating goals, identifying jobs, working through a checklist, creating an online presence, and identifying networking opportunities.

There are plenty of reason why someone would want to work from home:

  • Employees can save more than $7000 per year in employment related expenses.  With the rising cost of gas, I predict that number to rise even more.
  • The opportunity for career advancement. Women make up 42% of the leadership in remote companies.
  • Professionals with experience working remotely are 63% more likely to earn $100,000/year than those that have never worked remotely…making it worth your time to learn the skills needed to work remotely.
  • 96% of U.S. employees NEED some flex in their current job because of aging parents or the needs of small children.

For more information about the Remote Work Certificate Course, visit our website. The next class begins the first Monday of next month and registration ends soon, so register now.

~Brenda

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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URGENT – Mortgage Forbearance Deadlines this Week!

We mentioned Mortgage Forbearance earlier as a helpful tool for homeowners who are having trouble with their mortgage payments. Forbearance is when your mortgage servicer or lender allows you to pause or reduce your mortgage payments for a limited time while you build back your finances. The CARES Act (passed back in April of 2020) required that when a mortgage is backed by a Federal Agency, the borrower is automatically eligible for 3-6 months of forbearance if they are experiencing financial hardship resulting (directly OR indirectly) from COVID-19. Forbearance creates a helpful reprieve for struggling families.

The deadline to apply for forbearance under the CARES Act is September 30, 2021 IF your mortgage is backed by HUD/FHA, USDA, or the VA! That means NOW is the time for action. NOTE: if your loan is backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, there is not currently a deadline for requesting an initial forbearance.

Not Sure About Your Mortgage? Contact your mortgage company and ask them about your mortgage — asked if was backed by any of the agencies listed above. It that answer is “yes,” and if you are struggling with payments and bills, apply right away: ask your mortgage company to provide the needed application materials.

What does it mean to have your mortgage “backed” by a government agency? That simply means that when you bought your home, you qualified for special terms – often a lower down payment, reduced fees, or preferential interest rate thanks to a government program. I remember that when I bought my first house it was an FHA Loan; many first-time homebuyers qualify for special terms, and others do as well. If you are not sure, there is no harm in asking!

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau provides more information about forbearance. Financial assistance for homeowners at imminent risk of foreclosure may be available as well; the Iowa Finance Authority provides more information, about help that is currently available, and notes that more assistance, authorized under the American Rescue Plan Act, will be available within the next several months.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Aging Safely – Self or Others

While we’re all aging, some of us are further along in the process than others! But even you’re still very young, you probably have people you care about who might be labeled an “older adult.” With age comes certain privileges and freedoms, but we also have to acknowledge that aging also brings cognitive changes as well as physical changes. This is true even for those with no cognitive impairment or dementia – everyone’s brain changes as they age.

This cognitive aging can lead to “diminished financial capacity” – a term used to describe a decline in a person’s ability to manage money and financial assets to serve his or her best interests, including the inability to understand the consequences of investment decisions. Some errors that occur due to diminished financial capacity may be minor, like forgetting to pay a bill, but serious errors that threaten our financial security are possible.

Happily, there are steps we can take to protect ourselves and those we care about. These steps include:

  • keeping important documents organized and easy to find;
  • providing names of “trusted contacts” to your financial professionals;
  • creating (or updating) a power of attorney;
  • and more.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) provides a practical breakdown of steps that will protect you as you age, and also steps to help you assist an older friend or relative you are concerned about: Planning for diminished capacity and illness. None of us likes to think about possible future problems, but if something happens, we know we’ll be glad we did!

NOTE: People of all ages can be injured in accidents or suffer illness that diminishes ability to manage finances and make decisions. The steps outlined by the CFPB are appropriate for adults of all ages to consider.

For more details about cognitive aging and how it affects different types of mental functioning differently, see a trio of articles from The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, starting with Cognitive Aging: A Primer.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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College Students and Money: A few more things

This is the fifth and final in a series this week about financial issues faced by students in college and trade school.

The list of financial topics that are important to students and other young adults is potentially endless, so please don’t assume that I’ve covered everything this week. Whether we are age 20 or age 60, we always need to keep learning about finances, because the financial world keeps changing – and our needs keep changing too. I’m wrapping up this series with brief notes about three more issues I see as critical for students.

Organizing Important Documents. Keeping important documents in a safe place where you can find them easily if needed is a critical skill to learn. And it is important for all key documents, whether they are paper documents, or electronic documents. Examples of important documents include:

  • Financial records of all types – financial aid papers, loan papers, receipts for major payments (tuition, rent),
  • Documentation of required educational costs, because you may be eligible for tax benefits,
  • Legal contracts (e.g. lease, cell phone plan contract) and documentation of pre-existing damage in a rental unit or dorm room,
  • Tax documents, including prior-year tax returns and documents, along with current-year W-2 forms and any other income records, as well as other year-end tax forms received.

I will not pretend this is a comprehensive list. General rule: if you think it might be important, keep it, at least until you can ask someone trustworthy about it. And I don’t mean just keeping it all laying around your room. We want these documents in a safe place where you can find them. That means they should be enclosed (in a box, or an envelope, or a designated drawer), and ideally they would be sorted into groups or sections or folders so you don’t need to look through all 500 documents to find the one you need. On your computer, you need a folder for important documents, probably with several sub-folders.

Protecting Personal Information. This means never giving out key personal information (social security number, birthdate, financial account numbers, and more) without making sure the person who is asking has a good legal reason to need the information. You will generally need to give your social security number for financial accounts, formal academic records, and medical records.

Additionally, only give that information to people when you know for sure they are who they say they are. That means if you receive a phone call and the caller says they are from your bank, don’t assume it is safe. When people call you, there is no way for you to know who they really are. Instead, use the number you already have on file for your bank and call them. Make caution your middle name when it comes to key personal information.

More: What to Consider When Sharing Your Data (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau)

Using Credit Cards Wisely. We could write a whole series on credit cards – and you can search the MoneyTip$ blog for other articles – but I want to focus on three main points:

  • College is an opportunity to build credit. You can do that by getting credit card and using it. College is a time when credit cards want you as a customer – later in your life, it may be more difficult to obtain credit. So go ahead and open one or two credit card accounts, avoiding cards with annual fees. Then use them. It is only by using your credit cards and paying the bills promptly that you create something extremely valuable: a solid credit history.
  • Surprise credit card bills can kick off a downward financial spiral. Therefore, keep tabs on how much you have charged to your card since the last bill. Keep a record on your phone, or on your whiteboard, or in a notebook or your checkbook – it doesn’t matter where you keep the record. Just make sure you’re prepared for the bill when it comes.
  • Credit is generally free if you pay the bill in full each month. Assuming your card has a grace period and no annual fee, you will pay no interest at all on your purchases if you pay the entire balance before the due date each month. Sure, the bill says you only need to pay $25, but as soon as you carry a balance forward to next month, you start accruing interest on every purchase you make.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, right? These three habits – organizing documents, protecting personal information, and using credit wisely – will dramatically reduce the number of financial “bumps in the road” you’ll experience during college and throughout the rest of your life. You’ll never regret building these helpful financial habits.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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