Unretirement

Questions are part of our Writing Your Retirement Paycheck program. The more common questions are about finances, but every now and then, someone will ask, “How am I going to know when to retire and will I like it?” The question of when is sometimes tied to finances, which is fairly straightforward to discuss, but helping someone like retirement is a challenge.   

A number of individuals in the United States practice unretirement. A word being used to describe reentry into the workforce after a formal retirement. In an article published by the National Institute of Health, 80% of near-retirement individuals expect to return to the world of work in some capacity.  After 2 years, 25% are working full time.  Returning to work is less likely to occur if an individual experiences health issues. Interestingly, financial need does not appear to be a common reason for reentry into the workforce.

Retirement plans are highly individual; one size does not fit all. The successful transitions all have individual differences, but three elements are frequently mentioned.

  • A planned trip or activity to create a bridge between the everyday routine of going to work and the freedom of setting your own daily schedule. It creates a distraction and gives a chance for individuals to refocus on a new lifestyle.
  • Setting goals to complete in the early years of retirement. If chosen wisely, these goals help with time management, simulate thinking, and can result in enjoyment of new accomplishments.
  • Developing new relationships with individuals and groups outside of the workplace prior to retirement. New associations can help replace the psychological value individuals gained from their roles in the workplace. 

Planning for the transition to retirement is financial, but also includes mental preparation for a new lifestyle. Without that step, we might find ourselves part of the “unretirement” movement.  

Joyce Lash

Joyce Lash

Joyce Lash is a Human Sciences Specialist in Family Finance who wants to keep you ahead of the curve on financial information.

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Who needs an emergency fund?

jar of coins

If you’ve gotten along for years without any money in the bank, you might scoff when people suggest that establishing an emergency fund should be a priority. Perhaps you respond with: “I always find a way to deal with emergencies, even without money in the bank!” You are not alone. A recent survey found that 4 in 10 Americans could not cover an unexpected expense of $400; that might be the cost of replacing an appliance that died or an unexpected car repair.

If you’re one of those 4 in 10 Americans, you’ve probably paid a price for your lack of savings. 

  • Perhaps your landlord or the utility company has lost patience with you, and will no longer give you any leeway; they may even threaten to evict you or disconnect your services. 
  • Perhaps family members avoid your calls because they’re tired of you asking for money. 
  • Perhaps you pay tens (or hundreds) of dollars a month in late fees and interest because of unexpected expenses have put you behind on bills.

Here’s the hard truth: living with no savings creates real problems for individuals and families. Savings is essential for financial stability. It can also reduce family arguments and help you sleep better at night.

So the question is this: HOW does a person build up savings? There are lots of “tricks” people use to save money. For example, they may save all their change, or every $5 bill they receive in change; or they may have a “frugal week” each month, in which they give up extras like coffee, soda or eating out, and then save the money they would’ve spent on those things. I love hearing about the variety of strategies people use!

When it comes right down to it, though, there are two core elements of any savings plan:

  1. You must treat your savings like a bill, and pay yourself FIRST. If you wait, planning to save “whatever is left,” the saving probably won’t happen. Make your spending plan for the month (or the week), figure out how much you can save, and do it first. That is the best way to succeed with saving.
  2. You MUST be saving because it is important to YOU. If you try to save just because I told you that you should, it won’t work. You have to want to save in order to be willing to make the changes required for saving. So think about WHY you want to have some savings built up. Maybe you’ll think back to the stress and drama you experienced the last time an unexpected expense occurred; avoiding that stress might be your reason. Setting an example for your children might be your reason. Keeping the utility company happy might be your reason. Note: It helps if your partner and family also agree that saving is important.

How much should you have in your emergency fund? That’s up to you, but I encourage you to set a realistic goal for the short term. If money is tight, it might take a couple of years to get to $1,000. You need some success sooner than that, so a goal of $100 might be a good place to start. When you reach that goal, you can celebrate! (And then start toward $200).

How have you succeeded with saving? We’d love to hear your stories!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Retirement: Longevity vs Life Expectancy

When planning for retirement, we often look up our life expectancy. One good source of life expectancy information is the Social Security Administration.   Among the many tools they offer is a life expectancy estimator. I looked up my own life expectancy.  Assuming I live to retirement age (67), the average life expectancy for a woman my age is 87. So that means I should plan for retirement to last till 87, right? Not so much. Remember: life expectancy information gives the average.  (I might not be average – what about you?)

I recently discovered a tool called the Longevity Illustrator, offered by the Society of Actuaries.  Why is this different than a life expectancy estimator? Because longevity is not the same as life expectancy! Longevity is broader — it addresses the likelihood that a person will live to various ages.

The Longevity Illustrator provides insight into possibilities — what are the “odds” that a person will live to extremely advanced age, for example? Again, I used myself as an example; remember that my life expectancy, assuming I live to age 67, is about 87. The longevity illustrator points out that there is nearly a 50-50 chance I’ll live to age 90, a 28% chance I’ll live to age 95, and a 10% chance I’ll live to age 100!!

What does that mean for our retirement planning? The longevity illustrator explains that each of us needs to decide what level of certainty is important to us. For me, they pointed out that:

  • If I am comfortable with a 25% chance that I might run out of money, then I might plan for a 28-year retirement.
  • If I want more security — perhaps only a 10% risk that I would outlive my funds, then I should plan for a 33-year retirement.

Anytime our decisions involve unknowns, like retirement does, we need to prepare for some complex thinking. We need to consider a variety of possibilities, and recognize that there will be no certainty; instead, we need to think in terms of probability. We also need to be prepared to be flexible. It’s a challenge, but having good tools can help.

Check out the Longevity Illustrator from the Society of Actuaries and see how it can inform your retirement planning decisions!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Goal Check-up

We’re two months past new years… how are you doing with your goals or resolutions?

No, I’m not here to nag you! It’s your life and your money, and you should use it as you see fit. But … if there is something you really wanted to accomplish, and you haven’t made progress yet, then now is a great time to revisit the goal and come up with a strategy that will help you move forward!

One great starting place is to break down your goal into small steps so that you have something concrete you can accomplish each day or each week. An example:

Suppose your goal is to pay off an $800 hospital bill. You don’t have $800 sitting around, so it seems impossible.

To break it into small steps, you might decide to pay $100/month.

  • You could break that down even further by saying that you will take $25 from each weekly paycheck.
  • Or you might decide to take $70 from your paycheck the third week of the month (because you don’t have many bills due that week), and $10 from all the other paychecks.
  • You might go a step further and say that the way your going to come up with $10/week is by staying away from the vending machines at work. Or perhaps you’re going to save $25/week by taking your lunch to work.

Another key to reaching a goal is to be convinced of its importance. Reaching any financial goal requires making some type of change. We humans are generally unwilling to change unless it is for a really good reason. So spend some time focusing on WHY you set that goal. Are you truly “sold” on the goal? If yes, that will make it much easier to accomplish; any time you’re inclined to stray from your plan, you can remind yourself of the “why” behind your goal.

If, on the other hand, you are not fully “sold” on the importance of the goal, you may have difficulty accomplishing it. Perhaps it is not the right goal for you. Or … if you know in your head that it’s a valuable goal, you may want to spend some time convincing your heart of its importance — outline all the reasons why your brain knows this is important, or make a list of all the good things that will result from it.

These are not the only ways to be successful in reaching a goal, but in my experience they help a lot. Set goals that are important to you, and identify small steps that will move you closer to the goal!

Best wishes with your new New Year’s resolutions!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Defining Unexpected Expenses

Life is full of surprises and events that sometimes shatter our daily routines and our finances. 

Conventional wisdom says that the money in an emergency fund would be earmarked for “unexpected expenses.”  That is true.  However, let’s think about what expenses actually are (and are not) unexpected.

Expenses that are not unexpected: monthly and annual bills

  • Regular annual or semi-annual expenses are not unexpected: these include property taxes, car insurance premiums,  annual life insurance premium, eye exams and other once-a year expenses.  You can plan and prepare for these expenses by setting aside a fixed amount each month.  Since you know these expenses are coming, they cannot truly be considered emergencies.
  • Occasional maintenance or repairs, such as a leaky roof or a dishwasher breakdown are not fully unexpected. either.  The same is true for other ordinary home repair, care repair, and moderate medical bills.  You may not know exactly what expenses will come up, but if you have a body, a car or a home, you need to expect to spend money on maintaining them. Setting aside money each month will build a fund for home repair and maintenance, car repairs, and  ordinary medical bills.

What expenses are truly unexpected?

An emergency fund is intended for expenses that fall outside the categories of “annual bills” or ordinary maintenance of home, car, and health.  Unexpected expenses are events like losing your job or being struck by a massive, out-of-the-norm health-related bill beyond what insurance will cover.  Emergency funds are designed for expenses that are highly unusual, not for common occurrences.

Bottom Line: It is possible that the savings account you were labeling as an “Emergency Fund” is actually your “Yearly Expense and Maintenance Fund.” That’s a good fund to have. But perhaps you also need an emergency fund.

 

 

Susan Taylor

Susan Taylor

Resources are important whether you are looking to rent your first apartment, pay your bills, buy your first home or send your child to college. There are many ways to save money to reach your goals, and hopefully ISU Money Tip$ will be one of them. I enjoy traveling, needlework and am a novice gardener.

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A Book to Read

How’s your New Year’s resolution going?  Maybe I can help. Add a short term goal to read one book about money or personal management by the end of January and use the content to improve your original plan to improve your well being. Here are few I recommend:

The Millionaire Next Door identifies seven common traits that show up again and again among those who have accumulated wealth. If your resolution was to slow down the purchase of stuff, adopt a minimalist approach to life, or start recycling/reusing what you have, the book could give additional reasons to stick with it.  Authors are  Thomas Stanley, PhD and William Danko, PhD

 

 

Loaded by Sarah Newcomb, PhD, introduces you to behavioral finance. The book explains how our experiences with money have a psychological basis and can often run counter to what we’d like to accomplish. She explains that money is just a tool and how we use it is entirely a matter of personal choice.  The book offers advice about overcoming negative behaviors, so if you are concerned that you might fail to follow through with plans to change your use of money in 2019, this book offers tips that could help you change your goal and make it more achievable.

 

Charles Duhigg is a business reporter. The Power of Habit describes why habits exist and how they can be changed. Your resolution might be failing because you haven’t really examined why you are repeating the same behavior loop over and over again. Taking advantage of his tips to find your weak links and embrace change could lead to success.

 

Finally if you use this suggestion and read one book before the end of January, don’t forget to celebrate.   One short term resolution accomplished!!!

Joyce Lash

Joyce Lash

Joyce Lash is a Human Sciences Specialist in Family Finance who wants to keep you ahead of the curve on financial information.

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Auto-Pilot vs Mindlessness

Two cardboard boxes delivered to a residential home wait outside a black metal front door on a brick patio, Midwest, USA

We have frequently talked about strategies for making good financial habits. One strategies is to “make it automatic”. For example, if I want to save 10% of my monthly paycheck, I would have a greater chance of making it happen if I were to set it up with my employer. Each month, a portion of my paycheck could be auto-deposited in a savings account while the remainder of my check would go directly into my checking account. Basically, I made the decision once and it happens monthly without me having to remember to transfer money from my checking account to my savings account.

For the last couple of years, I have done a lot of on-line purchasing, including a large portion of my gifts and a few household consumables. Within the online shopping platform, I have always compared prices, companies, and options. I would also check Consumer Reports to compare brands and quality reviews. I considered myself to be a good shopper. When this online platform first arrived on the scene, I was diligent in comparing prices with our local stores to make sure I am getting the best deal.  In recent months, though, I haven’t done much comparison shopping;  …I just assumed…which I am sure is what online “stores” were counting on.  They hook consumers with the price, convenience & variety, and then later, when the prices rise, we either don’t notice or don’t care because we are hooked on the convenience.

This past week, a new study revealed that when compared to local store chains, this online shopping platform (the one I had gotten used to using) was not always a less expensive way to shop. This is NOT what I wanted to hear! I LOVE the convenience and the speed at which things arrive at my home. I WANT (but I don’t need) more brands to pick from.

So I have a mixed scorecard as an effective consumer. On the plus side, I have been effective in putting my savings account deposits on auto-pilot; but on the minus side, my desire to save money while shopping has slipped as it became a bit mindless. Now the I have to decide if the convenience is worth a slightly higher price.

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Holiday Wishes

Revisiting a holiday post from a previous year, and renewing happy holiday wishes for all!

For all you readers who celebrate ANY of the December holidays, today is probably NOT a day when you’re looking for a message or tip about wise use of money.  In my experience, by this point in the holiday season the die is cast — the money is pretty much all spent, or at least the decisions are made and the funds are committed. There’s not much I can say that will matter for now. (In a week or two it may be time for a clear money message — time to start new habits and/or address existing problems – but not now).

For now, in the midst of celebration and family time, now is simply the time to enjoy what life brings. To me, the key is to recognize that the most important gift you or anyone else can bring to holiday festivities is a gift of good cheer.

  • That means not comparing how much you spent with how much someone else spent on a gift. Instead, simply trust that you and everyone else gave with good intentions; this will bring the most joy to your celebrations.
    Note: this includes not judging yourself, as well as not judging others.
  • It means giving the best possible interpretation to the contributions and comments of others. Holiday festivities can bring stressful situations and poorly-thought-out comments; for everyone’s sake, this is a time to tune in to the positive to keep celebrations bright.
  • It means that maintaining and building relationships is more important than any detail that is amiss or any aspect of the feast that is less or more than past celebrations.
  • There is always something to enjoy or be grateful for. Bring a grateful or joyful attitude to celebrations, meals, and to giving and receiving.

No matter how much money you spend on holidays, it is gifts of good cheer, kindness, friendship and joy that will mean the most to you and all those in your world.

We at MoneyTip$ wish you very happy holidays!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Charitable Giving and Taxes

We’re entering a busy time of year for charitable donations, perhaps because the winter holiday season brings a sense of gratitude followed by a desire to share our abundance. The availability of tax deductions for charitable giving may also contribute to the concentration of donations near year-end.

According to Giving USA, Americans donated a record $410 billion to charities in 2017. What’s more, over 70% of that giving came from individuals, rather than foundations, corporations, or bequests.  However, tax law changes this year mean that for many people there will no longer be an advantage in itemizing deductions; many taxpayers will get better results using a standard deduction. For those households, the tax benefit of charitable donations will be reduced or eliminated.

Will Americans still give?  I have always hoped that the main reason most Americans give is that they care about the organizations they are giving to, and that the tax benefits are just an incidental benefit.

If you are wondering whether you should continue making charitable donations even without the tax deductions, I offer two thoughts:

  • If your standard deduction under the new tax law is larger than your itemized deductions would have been, then you are still coming out ahead. You can give, and still have more available funds than you would have had under the old tax law.
  • There are other strategies that can enable some taxpayers to get tax advantages for charitable donations.
    Clustering donations. Some taxpayers may be able to hold back all their 2018 donations until the beginning of 2019; if they then donate a “normal” amount throughout 2019, they will have twice as many donations as usual to report for the 2019 tax year, which may make itemizing worthwhile in 2019. Following this pattern of no contributions one year and double-contributions the next may enable you to donate the same total amounts as normal, and gain tax benefits by alternating years between itemized and standard deductions.
    Qualified Charitable Distributions (QCD) from an IRA.  If you are at least 70-1/2, you can transfer funds directly from your traditional IRA to a charitable organization; the distribution will not be taxable income to you, AND it can satisfy your required minimum distribution. If your RMD for the year is $5,000, and you are interested in donating $5,000 to a particular organization, then making the contribution through a QCD has the same ultimate impact on your taxes as a tax deduction would have had. IRS Publication 590-B provides details.
    Donating as a business expense.  If you are self-employed or own a business, you may be able to make charitable contributions as a business expense.  For example, farmers can give commodities (e.g. 500 bushels of corn) to a charity. This reduces your business income, and therefore has impact similar to the impact of a tax deduction. Consult with your tax adviser for details.

As always, the best decisions about how to use your money are based on your personal goals and priorities. As you consider your charitable giving decisions, focus on why you want to give when deciding whether and where to make donations. Giving to organizations you know (often local organizations) can ensure that your gifts are used well; when considering larger national charities, check them out with organizations that evaluate charities, such as  www.give.org, www.charitywatch.org, www.charitynavigator.org, or www.givewell.org.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Cost-Cutting vs. Saving: Not the same thing!

Most of us have dozens of ways we “save money:”

  • We “save” by using coupons and shopping sales.
  • We “save” by saying NO to ourselves and others when temptation arises.
  • We “save” by cooking at home instead of eating out.

Are you wondering why I put the word “save” in quotation marks in all those examples? Here’s why: even if we did all those things every single week, there is no certainty that our savings account balance will increase.

All those steps are ways we reduce costs, but do they automatically lead to deposits to savings accounts? No. Take me, for example: I have never once taken the money I did not spend at a restaurant or grocery store and deposited it into a savings account as a direct result of the decision not to spend. Instead, the money I “saved” would usually just get spent on something else!

A decision not to spend is a key step in saving. But by itself, that decision is not enough; it only turns into saving when we actually move the money into a savings account (or to a dedicated savings location such as a piggy bank).  When I come to a coffee shop or an ice cream store and I go on by without stopping because I want to save that money, I should probably just stop right there and transfer money from one account to another. Or I could carry a “saving” envelope in my purse and move cash into the envelope every time I resist temptation. That would be the way to make sure the actual saving occurred.

Saving is a two-step process. It involves deciding not to spend and  putting money in a designated location. Either step can come first. I can decide not to buy something and then save the money; OR I can put the money away first and then (out of necessity) spend less than I otherwise would have spent.
Note: many of us do better if we put the money in savings first!.When there’s no money in your billfold or your account, it’s easier to resist temptation to spend! 

Do you sometimes wonder why you aren’t getting ahead, despite your efforts? It may be because you’re skipping one of the steps.  How can you turn your cost-cutting into true savings progress?

 

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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