Some Things Never Change

I have three grown children: each with two kids of their own. They once shared (with an eyeroll) how they always knew when mom was learning a new parenting curriculum because I would implement the strategies and techniques on them. It is now a privilege and a joy to watch my kids as parents and occasionally I will see one of those strategies from their past emerge in their home.

I really liked those parenting programs and the lessons that they reinforced in my kids (showing love while setting limits, using natural consequences, Savings/Spending/Credit, etc.). But as you would expect, there is now an app for SOME of that.  One that caught my eye allows a parent to pay their child an allowance or for extra chores. The money accumulates on a debit card which they can use to purchase the things they want or need.

The latest app being used with a couple of my grandkids is quite amazing. It teaches the Time Value of Money, Smart Spending through Rewards and the power of delayed gratification using Savings Goals.  The free version allows you to assign points to chores the child can earn and points for rewards the child can save for. For example…if a child wants a sleep over, the child will need to earn 1000 points.  Cleaning the toy room (a weekly chore) may be worth 5 points while emptying the dishwasher (a daily chore) may be worth only 1 point. The points can be assigned a dollar value as well.  So, if the child wants a $5 stuffed animal and it takes 10 points to equal $1, the child will need 50 points to buy the stuffed animal….I think there is also a math lesson in there.

What keeps it interesting is the fact that no two kids are alike, so what works for one child may not work for the next. I see that with my grandkids: one is highly motivated by rewards and has a long list of wants, while the other just loves to help and has no wish list.

By searching for “Child Chore Apps” on the web, you will find lists of apps that could be useful to parents trying to raise responsible young people and provide kids an opportunity to experience, practice and apply life skills, including money management.

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

More Posts

Savings Strategies

Note: this post builds on yesterday’s post about having a meaningful reason to save.

Once you have a reason why you want to save, or save more, the next step is to “find” money to save. That generally means either increasing income or reducing expenses, which means something will need to change. Change can be hard, but most of us can succeed if we have a good enough reason.

To reduce expenses, you can make several small changes; for example, eat out one less time per week, drink one less can of pop each day, or stop buying magazines and read them at the library instead. OR, you could make one big change that saves money; for example, you could find a roommate to share housing expenses or move to a smaller (less expensive) apartment. To increase income, you could ask for more hours at work, get an extra part-time job, collect cans and bottles for the 5-cent deposit, or have a garage sale.

Once you have “found” some money by reducing expenses, increasing income, or both, the next key is to MOVE that money to a savings account or to some location where you are unlikely to touch it.

This seems like an obvious step, but it can be overlooked.

Imagine a scenario where you exercised self-discipline by skipping your morning coffee shop stop, bringing your lunch to work, and stuck to a limit at the grocery store! You’re proud of yourself! But if you don’t actually MOVE the money to your savings account, it will just end up getting spent on something else.

To make sure the money gets moved to savings, one helpful strategy is to treat savings like a bill you pay each month. If you’ve decided you can save $50/month by making some changes in spending, then “pay” that saving bill just like you pay your utility bill and your car payment. That approach increases your chance to be successful with saving. Even if you are saving small amounts, building the habit of saving each month is a way to reach your goals, whatever they may be.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

Financial Independence? Or Interdependence?

It’s my turn to write a financial blog post the week of Independence Day, and the obvious topic is to write about Financial Independence – which, for the average person, equates to retirement – the time when you have accumulated enough assets so that you can live on those assets rather than working. 

But when I think about it, I’m not convinced there IS such a thing as financial independence. I’m getting pretty close to a point where I might have enough assets to retire, but will that make me independent? I’ll still want to drive on roads that are paid for by my community, or county, or some other larger group of people. I’ll still want to use electricity, but I can’t pay for the electric grid on my own… I need everyone else to pay in too, or the whole system will fall apart.  

If I ever had a fire, I’d be grateful that the Red Cross showed up to help; likewise I’m grateful for the volunteers who make community beautification happen, and those whose volunteer work supports my public library, and those whose time and talents make community theater productions possible. An even less tangible example: my neighbors who have beautiful flower gardens that add beauty to my life. You get the point: even if we have more money than we need for ourselves, we still depend on others. And others depend on us. 

We value our independence as Americans. But I suggest perhaps we should give just as much attention to the importance of our INTER-dependence.  It’s worth remembering to appreciate all the services, amenities and intangible benefits we gain from being part of a larger community. It’s also worth supporting them. We support them financially in several ways: with our shopping (have you ever willingly paid a higher price in order to shop local?); with our tax payments; and/or with our charitable gifts. We may also support them with our time and skills, and just by being a good neighbor. That INTER-dependence is essential to keeping our communities and our country strong.  

Nearly all of us have had times when, if someone was “keeping score,” it would be clear that we RECEIVED more than we GAVE to this interdependent system. The nearly-universal example is when we were students in K-12 schools or at a college or university, especially if we received grants or scholarships. Many of us may encounter similar situations as we age. And certainly, when we have a serious crisis (like that home fire I mentioned above), we will likely receive more than we give or deserve.  

Thankfully, there’s no need to “keep score.” Instead, we’re better off simply celebrating the give and take that is central to the wellbeing of our communities and of our nation.  What INTER-dependence will you celebrate this week? 

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

Buy Now, Pay Later?

Recently I was in the store, and while walking in the aisle, I saw a sign saying “ Buy now and pay later – see the associate for details.” I might expect to see signs like that during winter holiday shopping, but not in the spring!

First, what is Buy Now Pay Later? Basically it’s an option that lets consumers finance their purchase by making small payments each month, without paying any interest. Example: purchase an air fryer for $125 by paying $25 at the time of purchase and promising four future payments of $25 (perhaps monthly or bi-weekly).

According to a 2021 survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis, people chose Buy Now, Pay Later for five main reasons, listed below in order of preference.

  1. The largest group (78%) stated that it was more convenient for them.
  2. The second reason given was that the consumers did not want use their credit card. Even though they could have purchased the product with a credit card, they feel they were better off without charging it to their credit card.
  3. The next reason was that it was the only way they could afford the product. This is certainly understandable for consumers who are living paycheck to paycheck on a tight budget. Any large purchase would constrain their budget; small payments make the purchase possible.
  4. Some people did some analysis to compare payment options, and concluded that “buy now, pay later” was the least-costly payment option available to them.
  5. Lastly, for some consumers “buy now, pay later” was the only payment method they had – they did not have checking accounts or credit cards available, and worked strictly with cash.  

It is important to point out that even though “Buy Now, Pay Later” does not charge a fee to the consumer, it is not truly free. The retailer offers it in cooperation with an outside finance company, which charges the retailer a fee for the service. Some retailers expect to see increased sales that will make up for the added cost; other retailers may pass the cost on to the consumer in the form of higher prices.

Budgeting for large purchases requires some planning. For those who do not have savings or credit available to cover the cost of a large purchase, Buy Now Pay Later may prove to be a very helpful option, enabling them to acquire higher-cost items they would not otherwise have been able to afford.

A caution: what if I buy an air fryer today (needing $25 payments), and a bike next week (with payments of $40) and a chainsaw the next week ($20 payments)?  Next month I’ll have a bunch of unusual payments to make. If it seems “easy” to make large purchases, consumers may make several purchases within a few weeks and find themselves overcommitted. Like all tools, “Buy Now, Pay Later” can be useful, as long as we use them carefully!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

Is Your Spending Plan Working?

A spending plan (aka “budget”) is a key to taking control of your money. But it’s not enough to make a spending plan. To get results, you need to go the next step and work your plan.

Think about it: you could make a plan that works out perfectly on paper — all your bills are paid, you have enough money for needs like groceries and gas and also some fun, AND you also put some money toward your longer-term financial goals. However, if your plan calls for spending $500 a month on groceries, and you actually spend $700 on groceries, then your plan is wrecked. You’ll end up with unpaid bills, unmet needs, and/or zero progress toward your goals. Even a “perfect” plan is no good if you don’t follow it.

Following a spending plan doesn’t have to be difficult, but it does take some attention: you’ll need a strategy to help you stay within the spending limits of your plan. In other words, you’ll need some method of tracking or monitoring your spending.

Let’s stick with the grocery example above. Perhaps we go to the grocery store 6-8 times during a month. If we want to make sure we keep our grocery spending below $500, we’re going to need some type of on-going record of what we’re spending. Maybe we just keep a list of grocery spending. Maybe we use a paper ledger form, an excel spreadsheet or a purchased software program. Maybe we use an app on our phone designed for that purpose. We could even put $500 cash in an envelope and only buy groceries using that cash — that way we would be unable to spend more than we planned.

A note of realism: unexpected events can interfere with our plans. A grocery example: suppose relatives decide to come visit you for a weekend. Suddenly your original grocery allotment of $500 might no longer be sufficient. Your plan will need to change. It’s your plan – you are free to change it if you need or want to change it! And here’s the good news – that change doesn’t have to wreck your plan! By keeping track and being aware that you are spending extra on groceries, you will know that you need to reduce your spending in some other area to compensate for your extra grocery spending. You will adjust your overall plan intentionally to accommodate the change.

Finding the right tool. There are multiple tools and strategies available to help with following your plan; different tools suit different people, so consider what will be most workable for you. The ISU Extension publication “Tracking Your Spending” provides a helpful overview of basic methods. Because no publication can keep up with the ever-changing landscape of software and mobile applications, some online research will be needed if you want to explore and compare those options.

For Iowans who would like help with making and following a spending plan, Extension specialists are available for one-on-one consultations, either in person or via phone or zoom. Don’t hesitate to contact us!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

Make the Most of Financial Literacy Month

April is Financial Literacy Month! This annual event reminds us ALL that we are never “done” with financial literacy. The world changes, financial products change, and our own needs change — that means we always need to keep learning about financial topics.

What do you want to learn more about when it comes to finances?

  • Is buying a home on your radar sometime in the next few years?
  • Do you need a retirement checkup to see if you are on track to meet your goals?
  • Do you want to start saving for your children’s education after high school?
  • Are you having trouble keeping up with your daily-weekly-monthly financial challenges?

Set a goal NOW to take steps toward being the informed consumer and financial manager you want to be! See below for ideas that will help you address the four questions above. And subscribe to MoneyTip$ to make sure you get ongoing reminders and updates on financial topics.

Remember that financial literacy is not just for young people, or for people who don’t know how to manage their money. Financial literacy is an ongoing topic for EVERYONE!

Ideas to help with the questions above:

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

Emergency Savings: How Much Do I Need?

Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, approximately 30-50% of adults in the United States (depending on the study) would struggle when faced with an unexpected or emergency expense. While the percentage of affected adults improved with the arrival of COVID relief programs, recent data shows that the numbers may be trending back down toward pre-pandemic levels. The aggregate data will continue to show these fluctuations over time depending on the macroeconomy, significant policy changes, etc., so a more immediate question for consumers is:  How much do I need in my emergency savings account? $400…$1,000…3-6 months of expenses? The answer is not concrete and completely depends on your own personal situation, but here are some things to consider:

  1. How large is your household? – the necessary living expenses for a single individual will likely look much different than a household of four.
  2. Do you own a home or rent? – homeowners face the risk of repair costs, which increases their need for emergency savings. The recent derechos are a perfect example.
  3. What are your insurance deductibles? – this is an often-overlooked aspect of emergency savings. Auto insurance deductibles tend to be around $250 or $500, while health insurance and homeowner’s insurance deductibles could be in the thousands. A higher deductible provides lower premium costs, but does increase your need for emergency savings.
  4. How stable is your income? – are you self-employed or an independent contractor? Do you work in a high-turnover industry or face occasional government shutdowns? How likely you are to need those savings to make up for lost income should also factor into the amount saved.

This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but rather a starting point for your emergency savings plan. For the DIY-ers, I encourage you to utilize PowerPay, Utah State University Extension’s free, online, personal finance tool to create your emergency savings plan; otherwise, you can contact your local Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Financial Educator for a free, confidential, 1:1 Financial Consultation!

Ryan Stuart

Ryan is a Human Sciences Specialist in Family Wellbeing and an Accredited Financial Counselor®. He focuses on educating and empowering all Iowans to independently make positive financial decisions throughout their life course.

More Posts

Talking with Children about Money

Guest blogger Carol Ehlers is a Human Sciences Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Wondering about the right time to talk to your kids about money? Children learn about money from many sources. Long before they enter school, they see adults using money and buying things. They see thousands of commercials each year. Like it or not, money is a part of your preschooler’s life.

What children witness affects their attitudes and how they value money. Some of these beliefs will help them as adult consumers and some will not. For example, they might get the message that saving is important or they might not.

As a parent or guardian, you will not be the only influence on what your child learns about using money. But when you daily reflect on basic lessons about money, you increase the chance that your child’s values will be similar to yours.

Simple activities and other resources, which are parent and child tested, can give ideas for:

  • Teaching how money works and what it can do;
  • Talking about how your family uses money; and
  • Modeling good money management.

Here are some tips and ideas for parents to use with their preschoolers to begin increasing their money management skills:

  • Encourage play that helps preschoolers think about money. This helps children learn about daily consumer choices. For example, play restaurant, supermarket, post office, bank, gas station or car wash.
  • Use games to help your child identify coins and values. Ask the preschooler to help you count out the money as you purchase items together.
  • Talk about work. Preschoolers can learn that some family members go to work to earn money for family needs such as food, clothes and the home. Preschoolers can learn that other family members work at home so that the family does not have to buy some good and services like laundry, cooking and yard work.
  • Share information. Talk with your child about how money is earned, paying for expenses and saving money. A good gift for a preschoolers to start learning this concept is a three part container with slots that are labeled SAVE, SPEND, And GIVE. There are some great examples on the internet.
Carol Ehlers

Money as You Grow, from the CFPB (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau) offers wonderful research-based guidance and financial learning activities for parents and caregivers of young children, and older children too.

The FDIC provides a range of resources for consumers, including free parent guides for four different age groups, including Pre-K through Grade 2, Grades 3-5, Grades 6-8, and Grades 9-12. Their page also features podcasts and games. (The parent guides are two-thirds of the way down the page).

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

It’s More Than Who You Know

A friend was visiting with a member of her family during a recent gathering.  They told my friend about a job opening at their workplace.  It was a remote job…a work from home opportunity with good pay and benefits. The next day, my friend sent in her resume, and two days later she had an interview.

In the past month I have: referred a couple of friends to job openings I knew about; received a phone call regarding someone who used me as a reference when they applied for a job; and met with a graduate of the Remote Work Certificate Course to help her prepare for an interview.

In the Remote Work Certificate course, offered through Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, many strategies are taught to build up your connections, because connections increase your chance of landing a good job. One of those strategies is social media, which can reach a lot of people with little time or effort. The most fruitful connections, however, will most likely be your direct personal connections.  You do not get referred if you do not connect with someone in a way that makes them trust you enough to refer you. Personally, in every job I’ve had except my first job, I had a personal connection that made the interview possible. Connections matter!

Important reminder: while the connections help you find the opportunities, and may help you land the interview, you still have to do your homework and work hard in preparing for the interview.

If you have a thirst for knowledge, know your strengths and want to work on them, and are thinking about getting into the remote workforce, check out the Remote Work Certificate course.  The next class begins January 4…application deadline is December 29.

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

More Posts

Thanks Giving: Give Wisely and Deduct

The Thanksgiving holiday is a time to stop and really notice how much we have to be thankful for. Many people take that gratitude a step further by sharing from what we have; they take their “thanks” and turn it toward “giving” to worthy charities this time of year. The arrival of “Giving Tuesday” next week also prompts people to give.

An article from the Iowa Attorney General’s office this week (see item 5 in the article) reminds us of steps to ensure we give wisely. Careless gifts may end up in the hands of criminals OR of organizations that do not use funds wisely. One way to make sure your money is used well for the cause you care about is to give to a local organization that has a good reputation. When giving to national organizations, you can make sure they are well-managed by checking one or more of these reputable charity rating sites: BBB Wise Giving AllianceCharity NavigatorCharityWatch, and GuideStar. The article offers more suggestions as well.

Another way to give wisely is to take the tax deduction for which you are eligible! Some people may say, “I don’t give to charity just for tax purposes – I give because I care!” That’s great. But if you take the tax deduction, and it reduces your tax bill (or increases your refund), then you have MORE money to give! Now that is wise giving!

The tax code allows us to deduct (subtract) our charitable gifts from our income before the tax is calculated. The government created that deduction to encourage us to give. By taking the deduction, and potentially having more to give, we are contributing to the valuable American habit of supporting worthwhile causes. There are two ways to deduct your charitable contributions:

  1. By “Itemizing” your deductions on Schedule A of your tax return. This is great for people who have enough deductions to be higher than the “standard” deduction allowed according to family type. For a single individual, that standard deduction is $12,550; for a married couple, it’s $25,100. Your tax preparer can help you know if this is advantageous for you.
    Good news! Even if you are better off with the standard deduction, a new law lets you deduct some 2021 giving anyway!
  2. Thanks to some of the COVID-relief legislation passed in 2020 and 2021, taxpayers can take a deduction for charitable contributions in 2021 even if they don’t itemize deductions! An individual tax filer can deduct up to $300 of monetary contributions to qualifying charities; for married couples filing jointly, that figure is $600.

In the midst of your Thanksgiving celebration, I encourage you to think about any charitable giving you might want to do, and then when you make the gift(s), be sure to keep the receipt for tax purposes! Plan now for #GivingTuesday and beyond!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

More Posts

    

Subscribe to “MoneyTip$”

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives

Categories