$1400 Stimulus: The Same, Yet Different

People are excited about the extra $1400 stimulus payments that are coming. Last Saturday, just ONE day after the bill was signed, I heard by the grapevine that some folks already received their payment! More received it this past week, and more will be receiving it in the next several weeks. Even though Americans knew this was coming, and even though it is the third in a series of payments promoting economic recovery from the impact of the pandemic, it does involve some differences worth noting.

  • All dependents qualify. Under the earlier stimulus payments, households received extra payment only for dependents who were eligible for the Child Tax Credit (i.e. under age 17). However, the new round of payments will include dependents who are older children, parents or others. Caveat: it may not be safe to assume that this includes dependents who are not relatives or other atypical dependents – we will need to watch how the law is applied.
    This is the BIGGEST change, and will affect MANY families!
  • The payments are protected from being held back to pay federal debts, such as back student loans, back taxes or back child support. However, as of now, these funds are not protected against private debt collectors after they arrive in your bank account; they could be seized (garnished) for repayment of credit card debt or other private debt.
  • The payments are available to people below certain income limits, just as before, but this time the phaseout is steeper. The phaseouts are as follows: Single Filers and Married Filing Separate phase out from $75,000 – $80,000; Head of Household phases out from $112,500 – $120,000; Married Filing Joint, from $150,000 – $160,000.
  • The steep phaseout means that for some households, the difference in income from one year to the next may be important. The income guidelines may be applied to your income for either of two or three tax years, and if you meet the rule for any of the years, then you will be eligible. For starters, they will check your most recently-filed return, which may be either 2019 or 2020. If you were below the threshold for 2019 but above it for 2020, it may be worthwhile to delay filing your 2020 return until you receive your payment. If your 2020 income is within the limits, then your 2020 return will be used, as long as it is filled within 90 days of the tax-filing deadline of May 17, 2020. And if you didn’t qualify based on 2020, you can still receive the payment as part of your 2021 tax return.
    One key implication: if your income in a normal year would put you above the limits, but you had lower income in 2020, then get your 2020 tax return filed before that deadline of 90 days after May 17!
  • If the payment is made based on your 2019 or 2020 income, and then your 2021 income proves to be above the limit, you will not need to pay anything back.

Source: Kitces.com

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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File Your Taxes for Free

Due to COVID, many VITA or AARP volunteer income tax sites are either closed this year or operating at limited capacity, in order to protect the health of all involved. If you have relied on free tax assistance in the past, what can you do now?

IRS Free File is one great answer. It’s an agreement the IRS has made with a number of tax software companies, so that people with incomes below $72,000 can use the software packages to file their federal return (and sometimes their state return) for free. There is no need to be intimidated by the idea of filing your own tax return — these software packages are designed to be very consumer-friendly. If you paid attention last year when your tax preparer reviewed your return with you, and if your situation this year is similar to last year, you are a perfect candidate to do it yourself!

When preparing your own tax return, be sure to:

  • Use a secure internet connection (don’t use public wi-fi at a coffee shop)
  • Read and answer the questions carefully
  • Take your time and double-check the information you enter
  • Remember that you can start one day and not finish – you can come back later when you’ve gathered more information.
  • Save the pdf of your return so you have a copy for next year.

If your tax situation has changed significantly since last year and you are not comfortable preparing your own return, there still are volunteer income tax sites available.  The IRS has a VITA site locator tool to help you find a site near you. NOTE: The site locator tool is not yet active — the IRS plans to have it operational by February 1. Likewise, the AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Locator is expected to come on-line in early February.

If you are eager to get moving now, remember that the IRS will not even begin accepting 2020 tax returns until February 12, due to late December changes in the tax law. We’ll all need to be patient for our tax refunds this year!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Excited for your Tax Refund?

Tax refund season is an exciting time for many families, because the tax refund is often the biggest financial event of the year. If your family is expecting a sizable refund this year, now is a good time to plan for how you will use that money.

Before making specific plans, I encourage you to think about this: the tax refund is a once-a-year event. That means it’s smart to think about the whole year’s worth of possible uses for that money. It’s a good idea because that reminds you to consider whether you’ll want to set aside some of it for things like…

  • Back to school costs
  • Winter coats for next winter
  • 2021 birthdays and holiday expenses
  • Summer day care costs when children are out of school
  • Car repair needs that might arise (or new tires)

If you think through possible expenses for the year ahead, you will be glad you did. It will help you reduce your overall stress load, since you’ll know you have a head start on meeting some of those needs. Of course I understand that if you have past-due bills right now, you’ll probably need to use your tax refund to catch up on those. I also understand that providing something special for yourself and your family right now may be important – whether that be a new piece of furniture or a trip to a restaurant. Only you can sort through all your options and decide on your highest priorities, but your plans will be stronger when you consider the whole year.

Keeping the whole year in mind as you think about your tax refund makes sense, doesn’t it? It’s just like when you get paid weekly or monthly, and you think about the whole week or the whole month before spending. Your tax refund may not be enough to cover all your special needs for the year ahead, but it sure can help.

Important Note: The IRS announced last week that it will not start processing tax returns until February 12. Why? Because the new law passed in the last week of December made several changes, and they need to make sure their computers have those changes programmed in. Result? Chances are your tax refund will be a little slower this year. No refunds will be issued at all until about a week after February 12. Build that delay into your plans.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Tax Law worth knowing: EITC “Look Back”

If a mention of tax law causes your eyes to roll back in your head, I ask you to snap out of it for a minute, because this one is important to ordinary households. It’s new (and temporary) — part of the new COVID relief bill enacted this past week, and it will be huge for many workers who have been unemployed or had reduced earnings in 2020.

The Earned Income Credit is a powerful tool for helping working families with lower wages. The amount you receive depends on your earned income. Higher earnings (up to a point) means higher EITC.

2019 EITC Chart: Married Couple with 2 children

Here’s a 2019 example: A married couple with 2 children and with earned income between $14,550 and $22,400, was eligible for an earned income tax credit of $5,828 in 2019. That’s an extra $5,828 added to their tax refund. If their income was below $14,550 then their EITC was lower, but even if they only earned a small amount from work, they would receive some EITC. If their income was higher than $22,400 the amount of EITC gradually dropped, but they would still receive some EITC even if their income was as high as $52,400.

Suppose: a married couple with 2 children earned $25,000 in 2019, and received an EITC of $5,785. However, in March of 2020 they were laid off. They did receive unemployment, but that is not earned income. Their actual earnings from work in 2020 was only $5,000, which made them eligible for EITC of $2,010. That’s a loss of over $3,700, in a year when they were already struggling. The “look-back” provision in the new relief bill allows them to receive EITC (and also the Child Tax Credit) based on their 2019 earned income if it would be more beneficial.

By contrast, imagine a married couple with two children who had earned income of $60,000 in 2019. Their income was too high for EITC in 2019. However due to furloughs, their earned income in 2020 was only $40,000. They will be eligible for EITC in 2020 based on their 2020 earnings (assuming they meet other eligibility rules). When calculating EITC and CTC, taxpayers can choose to use either 2019 or 2020 income figures, depending which is better for them.

Tax law worth knowing!

Source: Kitces.com

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Money Guidance via Podcast

graduates

Targeting those in college or planning for college, the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently launched a podcast called Financial inTuition. The six episodes currently available are divided into two categories: three episodes focused on student loans, and three on basic money management skills with a focus on issues faced by students.

Each episode includes an interview with either an expert or a consumer with first-hand experience. It’s always helpful to learn from other people’s experience!

The podcast is available free wherever you get your podcasts, OR directly from the CFPB website. It is part of a broader set of resources targeting students and young adults on topics like paying for college (including information about student loans and the GI Bill), and money management information for economically-vulnerable consumers (which includes most young adults just starting out) on topics like building credit access and finding money to save. They also provide materials for both youth educators and adult educators.

Check out these resources for yourself OR share them with someone you care about!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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EIP Day November 10

If you did not receive your $1200 Economic Impact Payment, it’s still not too late – they delayed the deadline! Next Tuesday, November 10 is designated as EIP Registration Day. Take advantage of this awareness campaign and claim your credit now! NOTE: If you’ve already received your payment, please help us spread the word. If you have ways of reaching people who are homeless, that may be especially important!

The big push at this point is to reach those who do not normally need to file a tax return. The IRS has a special on-line portal just for you folks, where you can enter all the needed information. This video explains how. NOTE: you will need to enter personal information, so be sure you are using a secure internet connection. This will usually take 10-15 minutes.

Iowans who need help with this process are encouraged to contact their local Extension family finance specialist for help. For more information go to the IRS information page on the EIP; to help spread the word via social media, check out the IRS Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, or YouTube sites.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Pandemic-Induced Goals?

The current period of job loss and reduced income has affected people in different ways. The result? Different households face different financial challenges at this point. Whatever your situation, now is s a good time to assess your financial situation, evaluate your priorities, and take steps to improve your situation as necessary. If you’d like some help, your local ISU Extension financial educator is available to work with you, providing free, non-commercial information and a sounding board as you make your plans.

  1. Some of you have been living with seriously reduced income – and still are. Your task has been to find every possible way to reduce your expenses and/or find new income and make use of new resources, including public assistance if you qualify. You must communicate with all of your creditors, but avoid making promises you cannot keep. If returning to something like normal looks unlikely, you may need to consider major lifestyle changes.
  2. Some of you lost income for a while, but are now back to an income you can live on. It is likely that you got behind on bills, built up credit card debt, and/or depleted your savings during your crisis. Strong focus on repaying those debts and building up emergency savings will get you ready in case of an unexpected expense or another loss of income. Careful examination of your spending choices will help you regain equilibrium and then build a strong cushion.
  3. Others of you had stable income, but have realized that if you did lose income, you would be in a very difficult spot. Facing the reality that you lack basic financial security can motivate you to build up savings and pay down debt. Start by cutting your living expenses so that your regular monthly expenses are 10-25% less than your income. Putting the extra funds toward savings and expedited debt payment will build you a cushion that will bring peace of mind and make your life easier if/when hardship strikes.
  4. Still others have stable income, and have felt secure that even if you did have a cutback, you would be okay. In your case there is no obvious need for change, but it’s wise to maintain control of your finances through good planning. You may wish to build an even stronger savings cushion, after seeing others struggle with lost income for six months or longer. As you build savings, seek out accounts that pay slightly higher interest while still providing ready access to your funds.
Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Unemployment and Taxes

Did you know unemployment benefits count as taxable income? If you (or someone you know) have received unemployment income during this year when so many people have experienced job loss, here is the bigger question: Did you have taxes withheld from the payments?

If you are currently receiving unemployment income, now is a good time to check and see if federal and state income taxes are being withheld; if they are not, you should be able to change that going forward. Why does it matter? Next winter when you file your 2020 tax return, you will find out how much tax you owe on your 2020 income. If you didn’t have enough withheld from your paychecks, then you may need to pay in by April 15. It’s possible that the amount you need to pay in could be $1,000, $2,000 or even more. In addition, you may owe penalty for not having enough withheld, and/or a penalty for late payment if you cannot pay the bill in full by April 15.

What can you do now? If you received unemployment income and did NOT have taxes withheld, I would encourage you to go to the IRS Tax Withholding Estimator, and enter information about all your income for the year, along with the information it asks for about family size and other tax-related issues. Don’t worry; this is anonymous – it’s just a calculator for your own benefit. Based on the results of your calculations, you should have a pretty good idea of what to expect. If it looks like you will owe taxes, you can start saving now, or even send in one or two quarterly estimated payments using IRS form 1040 ES. Checking in with your tax preparer might also be a good idea.

The IRS recently issued a poster alerting people to take action and avoid the unpleasant surprise of a big tax bill. If you can, please consider posting it on social media or posting printed copies at your place of work, or house of worship, or at local businesses, to help others plan ahead.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Juggle—Stop—and Slide Expenses

Juggle—Stop—and Slide your personal expenses throughthis COVID-19 global pandemic using tools, actions and strategies to protect your family.

Juggle– Put money you would have normally spent for things (e.g., personal care, commuting costs and child care) toward other essential bills. Rework your budget and reallocate money you are not currently spending.  We shifted money not spent on gas and eating out. Those dollars are now budgeted for extra costs for an unplanned internet upgrade. Consider online budget tools like this one from the University of Wisconsin.

Stop- Take immediate action to stop all excess spending. Ask: “How can we reduce spending?”

  • Substitute a less costly item
  • Conserve resources and avoid waste
  • Cooperate with others by trading or sharing resources
  • Save money if we do it ourselves
  • Do without

These ideas and more are available at the University of Minnesota’s “Strategies for Spending Less” page. You’ll find other resources on ISU Extension’s Finding Answers Now page

Slide- Take advantage of Covid19 Special offers and slide a portion of the bill forward.

Our mobile phone carrier will not charge a late fee or terminate service through June 30. To qualify due to hardship a short online form is required.   Iowa utility providers (i.e. energy and water) may provide relief payment options, assistance programs, and low-cost steps for customers according to the Iowa Utility Board.  https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/pages/faqs#Utilities

Free and confidential consultations with ISU Extension financial educators are available to all Iowa residents. We can provide tools and information to help you revise budgets, prioritize spending and link to community resources. 

Find your local Extension educator or contact Iowa Concern 800-447-1985 for information. Consider our free booklet: “Planning to $tay Ahead”  English and Spanish https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/5523

Carol Ehlers

Guest Blogger: Carol Ehlers,
Human Sciences Specialist in Family Finance

Brenda Schmitt

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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