New Option on the Advance Child Tax Credit Portal

Families can now easily update their mailing address in the IRS Child Tax Credit portal. This is very important for families who choose to receive their payments in the mail, rather than by direct deposit.

To use the portal, go to the IRS Child Tax Credit page and select “Manage Payments.” The portal now allows users to:

  • Change their mailing address;
  • Switch from receiving a paper check to direct deposit;
  • Change the account where their payment is direct deposited; or
  • Stop monthly payments for the rest of 2021.

If you run into challenges using the portal, our July 12 post offers a few tips. An earlier post explains what is different about the Child Tax Credit in 2021, including who is eligible for the expanded credit. If you previously were eligible, based on your income in prior years, but are no longer eligible now, you might consider opting out of the advance payments, which are being sent monthly on the 15th of each month through the end of 2021.

Log into the portal by midnight (Eastern Time) on August 30 if you want the changes to kick in for the September 15 payment. The IRS expects to add a few more functions to the Child Tax Credit portal in coming months, including the ability to:

  • Add or remove children in most situations;
  • Report a change in marital status; or
  • Report a significant change in income.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Improve Retirement Readiness by Being Realistic About Social Security

We already know that the average American is financially under-prepared for retirement, putting them at risk for lifestyle cutbacks and even hardships in retirement. A recent study (University of Michigan Retirement and Disability Research Center) showed:

  • that having unrealistically high expectations for Social Security benefits contributes to inadequate retirement savings; and
  • that the majority of workers over-estimate what they will receive in Social Security retirement income.

Those two findings combine to suggest trouble ahead. And it doesn’t take TOO much thought to reach the conclusion that everyone needs realistic expectations about Social Security income in retirement. The good news? It’s pretty easy to obtain a reasonable estimate of your Social Security income!

The Social Security Administration offers two excellent tools we can use to obtain a good estimate of what our Social Security retirement benefit will be. Both involve entering personal data, so be sure to use a secure internet connection. The Retirement Estimator provides a personalized estimate of your benefit at three ages: 62; your full retirement age (which is between age 66 and 67); and age 70. By logging into your “My Social Security” account on-line, you can see even more: you can pick a precise age at which you wish to claim social security, rather than being limited to just three options, AND you can review the earnings record shown there to make sure that all your earnings are included. Note: about a month ago I talked with a woman whose record was missing her earnings for 2018 and 2019! It’s a good thing she checked! Without those figures, her Social Security income would have been lower than what she was supposed to receive.

Suppose you discover that your Social Security income is projected to be about $2,000/month (in today’s dollars). Then you can consider: do you want to live on $2,000/month after you retire? If you’d rather have more income to live on in retirement, that’s motivation to save and invest now! To get started, learn about retirement saving options available through your employer: if a 401(k) or other tax-advantaged plan is available to you, that can be a great option. If your employer will match your contributions to a retirement account, then be sure to take advantage of that match, as well.

For those who do not have a retirement savings option available through their job, be sure to check out your Individual Retirement Account (IRA) options. The IRS Publication 590A explains the rules associated with contributing to an IRA account. You may choose to consult with a financial adviser in deciding how to invest those funds – an IRA can be invested in any type of financial account, including mutual funds, a stock and/or bond portfolio, and money market accounts. Your choice of investments, along with your decisions about how much to save, will have a huge impact on your retirement well-being. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) offers great learning materials for learning to invest and for choosing financial professionals.

Sources: Squared Away Blog: Workers Overestimate their Social Security, 6-17-21, from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; and
Prados, María J., and Arie Kapteyn. 2019. Subjective Expectations, Social Security Benefits, and the Optimal Path to Retirement, University of Michigan Retirement and Disability Research Center.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Child Tax Credit Update: Non-Filers Tool

Over the next few weeks we expect to see several updates about how to access the special 2021 Child Tax Credit described in last week’s post. Reminder of what makes the 2021 credit “special:” 1) it is bigger; 2) part of it is payable in monthly advance payments beginning in mid-July; and 3) it’s available even to people who don’t file taxes and/or who don’t have income!

Today the IRS announced a new “Non-Filer Sign-Up Tool” for those who did not and will not file in 2019 or 2020.

For most households, the IRS will base the monthly advance payments on information from 2019 or 2020 tax returns. But what about people who did not file and do not NEED to file for either 2019 or 2020? Today the IRS announced a new “Non-Filer Sign-Up Tool” to help make sure those folks receive their payments. This allows parents/guardians to enter information about the people in their household, AND to enter direct deposit information so they receive their tax credit payments speedily.

Please share this information with those who need it!!

A couple of notes:

  • If you filed a 2019 or 2020 tax return, you don’t need to take any action.
  • If you used the “non-filers tool” LAST year (2020) to receive your Economic Stimulus Payment, you don’t need to take any action.
  • In the coming weeks the IRS will be adding two more tools: 1) an interactive tool to help you find out if you are eligible for the expanded Child Tax Credit; and 2) a Child Tax Credit Update Portal, where you can add children born in 2021 or make updates that matter, including changes to your address or bank information.
  • A non-profit organization has launched a consumer-friendly informational website that may be useful at https://www.getctc.org/en. I recommend sharing it widely!

Source: https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/irs-unveils-online-tool-to-help-low-income-families-register-for-monthly-child-tax-credit-payments
For more information: https://www.irs.gov/credits-deductions/advance-child-tax-credit-payments-in-2021

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Attention Parents! New Child Tax Credit Features

The American Rescue Plan Act, a huge federal COVID recovery bill passed in March, did more than provide for $1400 stimulus payments. One of its provisions will soon begin impacting millions of American families with children: advance payment of the expanded child tax credit. Those affected should:

  • Plan now for best use of extra funds.
  • Make a point to pay attention to IRS updates on this topic over the next several weeks.
  • Watch their mail – the IRS has begun this week to mail a general information letter to all families it believes to be eligible. In July, they will mail individualized letters specific to each household, telling what to expect.

Expanded Credit. The Child Tax Credit was formerly $2,000 per child; it was unavailable to families with no income, and the amount was limited for families with very low income. For 2021 only:

  • Families with children who will still be under age 18 at the end of the year (born after December 31 2003) are eligible for the full amount of the credit, even if they had no or low income.
  • The amount of the annual credit is increased to $3,000 for most children, and to $3,600 for children under 6 (born after Dec 31 2015).

NOTE: the expanded credit is available to families with incomes below $75,000 (single); $112,500 (head of household); or $150,000 (married-joint). Families with higher incomes will still receive the $2,000 child tax credit under the previously-existing rules.

Advance Payment. Instead of waiting until tax time next February, eligible families will begin receiving monthly advance payments for part of the Child Tax Credit. This means that beginning about July 15 through December, families will receive monthly payments from the IRS equal to $250 per child. The amount will be $300 for younger children eligible for the $3,600 credit. These advance payments will equate to half of the total tax credit; the remainder will be paid as part of the household’s tax refund next spring.

Consider focusing on family stability. Before making special purchases, families may wish to use the funds to get current and/or stay current on all household expenses (rent, utilities, child care, etc). Building a savings cushion also promotes stability: 1) providing funds in case of unexpected expenses such as car repair or appliance replacement; AND/OR 2) covering upcoming expected costs such as back-to-school, holidays, or property taxes. A savings cushion to cover extra expenses can prevent financial setbacks, promote family stability, and reduce financial stress.

Paying off debt is also a good use of extra funds, especially debts with high interest rates. HOWEVER, it is often wise to build a savings cushion even before all debt is paid off. Without that savings, every unexpected expense simply creates more debt and more stress.

Watch for Updates! The IRS will base payments on information from 2020 tax returns. If your situation changes, you will be able to let them know of changes through one or more on-line portals they will create in the near future (similar to the “Check Your Refund” portal, or the “Get My Payment” portal used for stimulus payments). The portal(s) will allow families to enter information such as: bank information for direct deposit; a new child in your household; updated mailing address. The portal will also allow you to decline the advance payments and choose to receive the entire amount with your tax refund after the year is over.

The IRS reference page for the advance child tax credit is here.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Get Help Paying the Internet Bill

In a new program from the Federal Communications Commission, qualifying households are eligible for a temporary monthly discount on their broadband internet service; in most cases, the discount is $50/month. The income guidelines are low, so only a fraction of Americans will qualify, but if someone you know is eligible, that $50/month could make a huge difference to their family.

You may qualify if any one of the following applies to you:

  • People with incomes below 135% of the poverty level. That’s about $17,000/year for a single person, or $35,000/year for a family of four.
  • You are eligible for Food Assistance, Medicaid, Free or Reduced School Lunch, or Lifeline benefits.
  • You participate in certain tribal programs, including BIA General Assistance, Tribal Head Start, Tribal TANF, or emergency food distribution.
  • You are a student receiving a Pell Grant.
  • Your household has lost significant amount of income due to pandemic-related job loss. NOTE: this qualification includes people with incomes well above the 135% poverty threshold.

The funding is temporary, and will end when the program runs out of money OR six months after the US Department of Health and Human Services declares an end to the COVID public health emergency. Apply now in order to take advantage of this opportunity.

To Apply: Go to https://getemergencybroadband.org/ where you will find all the details and the on-line application form.

Source: Consumer Action, which offers this information in Spanish.
The Federal Communications Commission offers pdf fact sheets in Arabic, Amharic, Burmese, Chinese-Traditional, Chinese-Simplified, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Somali, Tagalog, and Vietnamese as part of their outreach toolkit.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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$1400 Stimulus: The Same, Yet Different

People are excited about the extra $1400 stimulus payments that are coming. Last Saturday, just ONE day after the bill was signed, I heard by the grapevine that some folks already received their payment! More received it this past week, and more will be receiving it in the next several weeks. Even though Americans knew this was coming, and even though it is the third in a series of payments promoting economic recovery from the impact of the pandemic, it does involve some differences worth noting.

  • All dependents qualify. Under the earlier stimulus payments, households received extra payment only for dependents who were eligible for the Child Tax Credit (i.e. under age 17). However, the new round of payments will include dependents who are older children, parents or others. Caveat: it may not be safe to assume that this includes dependents who are not relatives or other atypical dependents – we will need to watch how the law is applied.
    This is the BIGGEST change, and will affect MANY families!
  • The payments are protected from being held back to pay federal debts, such as back student loans, back taxes or back child support. However, as of now, these funds are not protected against private debt collectors after they arrive in your bank account; they could be seized (garnished) for repayment of credit card debt or other private debt.
  • The payments are available to people below certain income limits, just as before, but this time the phaseout is steeper. The phaseouts are as follows: Single Filers and Married Filing Separate phase out from $75,000 – $80,000; Head of Household phases out from $112,500 – $120,000; Married Filing Joint, from $150,000 – $160,000.
  • The steep phaseout means that for some households, the difference in income from one year to the next may be important. The income guidelines may be applied to your income for either of two or three tax years, and if you meet the rule for any of the years, then you will be eligible. For starters, they will check your most recently-filed return, which may be either 2019 or 2020. If you were below the threshold for 2019 but above it for 2020, it may be worthwhile to delay filing your 2020 return until you receive your payment. If your 2020 income is within the limits, then your 2020 return will be used, as long as it is filled within 90 days of the tax-filing deadline of May 17, 2020. And if you didn’t qualify based on 2020, you can still receive the payment as part of your 2021 tax return.
    One key implication: if your income in a normal year would put you above the limits, but you had lower income in 2020, then get your 2020 tax return filed before that deadline of 90 days after May 17!
  • If the payment is made based on your 2019 or 2020 income, and then your 2021 income proves to be above the limit, you will not need to pay anything back.

Source: Kitces.com

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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File Your Taxes for Free

Due to COVID, many VITA or AARP volunteer income tax sites are either closed this year or operating at limited capacity, in order to protect the health of all involved. If you have relied on free tax assistance in the past, what can you do now?

IRS Free File is one great answer. It’s an agreement the IRS has made with a number of tax software companies, so that people with incomes below $72,000 can use the software packages to file their federal return (and sometimes their state return) for free. There is no need to be intimidated by the idea of filing your own tax return — these software packages are designed to be very consumer-friendly. If you paid attention last year when your tax preparer reviewed your return with you, and if your situation this year is similar to last year, you are a perfect candidate to do it yourself!

When preparing your own tax return, be sure to:

  • Use a secure internet connection (don’t use public wi-fi at a coffee shop)
  • Read and answer the questions carefully
  • Take your time and double-check the information you enter
  • Remember that you can start one day and not finish – you can come back later when you’ve gathered more information.
  • Save the pdf of your return so you have a copy for next year.

If your tax situation has changed significantly since last year and you are not comfortable preparing your own return, there still are volunteer income tax sites available.  The IRS has a VITA site locator tool to help you find a site near you. NOTE: The site locator tool is not yet active — the IRS plans to have it operational by February 1. Likewise, the AARP Foundation Tax-Aide Locator is expected to come on-line in early February.

If you are eager to get moving now, remember that the IRS will not even begin accepting 2020 tax returns until February 12, due to late December changes in the tax law. We’ll all need to be patient for our tax refunds this year!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Excited for your Tax Refund?

Tax refund season is an exciting time for many families, because the tax refund is often the biggest financial event of the year. If your family is expecting a sizable refund this year, now is a good time to plan for how you will use that money.

Before making specific plans, I encourage you to think about this: the tax refund is a once-a-year event. That means it’s smart to think about the whole year’s worth of possible uses for that money. It’s a good idea because that reminds you to consider whether you’ll want to set aside some of it for things like…

  • Back to school costs
  • Winter coats for next winter
  • 2021 birthdays and holiday expenses
  • Summer day care costs when children are out of school
  • Car repair needs that might arise (or new tires)

If you think through possible expenses for the year ahead, you will be glad you did. It will help you reduce your overall stress load, since you’ll know you have a head start on meeting some of those needs. Of course I understand that if you have past-due bills right now, you’ll probably need to use your tax refund to catch up on those. I also understand that providing something special for yourself and your family right now may be important – whether that be a new piece of furniture or a trip to a restaurant. Only you can sort through all your options and decide on your highest priorities, but your plans will be stronger when you consider the whole year.

Keeping the whole year in mind as you think about your tax refund makes sense, doesn’t it? It’s just like when you get paid weekly or monthly, and you think about the whole week or the whole month before spending. Your tax refund may not be enough to cover all your special needs for the year ahead, but it sure can help.

Important Note: The IRS announced last week that it will not start processing tax returns until February 12. Why? Because the new law passed in the last week of December made several changes, and they need to make sure their computers have those changes programmed in. Result? Chances are your tax refund will be a little slower this year. No refunds will be issued at all until about a week after February 12. Build that delay into your plans.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Tax Law worth knowing: EITC “Look Back”

If a mention of tax law causes your eyes to roll back in your head, I ask you to snap out of it for a minute, because this one is important to ordinary households. It’s new (and temporary) — part of the new COVID relief bill enacted this past week, and it will be huge for many workers who have been unemployed or had reduced earnings in 2020.

The Earned Income Credit is a powerful tool for helping working families with lower wages. The amount you receive depends on your earned income. Higher earnings (up to a point) means higher EITC.

2019 EITC Chart: Married Couple with 2 children

Here’s a 2019 example: A married couple with 2 children and with earned income between $14,550 and $22,400, was eligible for an earned income tax credit of $5,828 in 2019. That’s an extra $5,828 added to their tax refund. If their income was below $14,550 then their EITC was lower, but even if they only earned a small amount from work, they would receive some EITC. If their income was higher than $22,400 the amount of EITC gradually dropped, but they would still receive some EITC even if their income was as high as $52,400.

Suppose: a married couple with 2 children earned $25,000 in 2019, and received an EITC of $5,785. However, in March of 2020 they were laid off. They did receive unemployment, but that is not earned income. Their actual earnings from work in 2020 was only $5,000, which made them eligible for EITC of $2,010. That’s a loss of over $3,700, in a year when they were already struggling. The “look-back” provision in the new relief bill allows them to receive EITC (and also the Child Tax Credit) based on their 2019 earned income if it would be more beneficial.

By contrast, imagine a married couple with two children who had earned income of $60,000 in 2019. Their income was too high for EITC in 2019. However due to furloughs, their earned income in 2020 was only $40,000. They will be eligible for EITC in 2020 based on their 2020 earnings (assuming they meet other eligibility rules). When calculating EITC and CTC, taxpayers can choose to use either 2019 or 2020 income figures, depending which is better for them.

Tax law worth knowing!

Source: Kitces.com

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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