Money Guidance via Podcast

graduates

Targeting those in college or planning for college, the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently launched a podcast called Financial inTuition. The six episodes currently available are divided into two categories: three episodes focused on student loans, and three on basic money management skills with a focus on issues faced by students.

Each episode includes an interview with either an expert or a consumer with first-hand experience. It’s always helpful to learn from other people’s experience!

The podcast is available free wherever you get your podcasts, OR directly from the CFPB website. It is part of a broader set of resources targeting students and young adults on topics like paying for college (including information about student loans and the GI Bill), and money management information for economically-vulnerable consumers (which includes most young adults just starting out) on topics like building credit access and finding money to save. They also provide materials for both youth educators and adult educators.

Check out these resources for yourself OR share them with someone you care about!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Beware: Vaccine Scams

Like anything else that is new, the COVID vaccine is likely to be followed quickly by vaccine-related scams as well as misinformation. Likely scams to watch for:

  • Opportunities to “move higher on the list” by paying a fee. Truth: the vaccine roll-out is being carefully monitored, and there will be no way to get the vaccine quicker.
  • Any contact or news suggesting you pay a fee to receive the vaccine. Truth: due to the need to get as many people vaccinated as possible, you are likely to have no out-of-pocket cost when getting the vaccine.
  • Any contact asking for your social security number, bank account information or credit card number in order to schedule a vaccination. Truth: it is NEVER wise to give out personal or financial information when you did not initiate the contact.
  • Alternative “cures,” treatments,” or “preventives” for sale while you wait your turn for the vaccine. Truth: it is never wise to accept health advice or purchase health products from anyone other than a reputable health provider. Contact your own provider before purchasing any product or service.

Along with the potential for scams, the arrival of a vaccine creates opportunity for misinformation. Rely on trustworthy sources. For health information related to COVID-19, consult www.coronavirus.gov or www.coronavirus.iowa.gov. Both of these sites draw information directly from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other reputable sources.

Source: Federal Trade Commission

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Thinking Out Loud

If being careful with your money is important to you, and if you have children, then you are probably looking for ways to teach your children good money management skills. You probably also hope they will form values and priorities that are similar to yours.

Depending on the age of your children, you may have already learned that “preaching” (that is, telling them what to believe and do) is rarely the answer — if your children are still quite young, you may not have learned that yet, but you probably will! One strategy I learned when my children were young was that it paid to “think out loud”… to let them hear my thought process as I was making decisions.

The simplest examples would take place at the grocery store – decisions about which box of cereal to buy or which can of tomato sauce. If I spoke my thoughts aloud, they would be exposed to the ideas like: unit pricing (comparing price per ounce of different size packages); generic vs brand-name decisions (when it might be worth paying more, and when it might not be); and trade-offs (if I buy pork chops instead of beef steak, I can use the extra money for ice cream). Those are all assessments I make in my head when I shop alone, but when children are present it becomes a teaching opportunity if I say my thoughts aloud.

Similar “thinking out loud” situations could occur when buying clothing – they would be exposed to my thoughts on quality vs price, ease of cleaning (i.e. dry clean or hand wash vs machine wash) and other factors. I remember the purchase of a recliner where they saw me weighing options and they learned that we’re often unable to find the perfect product, so we have to decide what factors are most important to us.

Setting a good example is a powerful teaching strategy in everything from good manners to personal hygiene. With financial decisions, though, children won’t even be aware of what we’re doing unless we let them in on our thought processes. That’s where “thinking out loud” comes in – it makes them aware of why we make the decisions we make.

Money as You Grow: Resources for Parents and Caregivers is a wonderful resource from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for those seeking to help their children learn financial management skills.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Understanding Health Insurance

This time of year many Americans make health insurance decisions. If your health insurance comes through your employer, you may be making plan choices in the next month or so, and if you purchase insurance individually, open enrollment is November 1 through December 15. Are you equipped to make informed choices about your health insurance?

ISU Extension and Outreach offers two free on-line workshops on health insurance topics:

  • Smart Choice Basics focuses on the key things to know before you sign up for a specific health plan. It’s useful to people who get their insurance through their employer as well as to people who need to purchase insurance on their own. It also addresses questions about how to get help paying for health insurance via the HealthCare.gov Marketplace. It is being offered November 19 and December 1 (6 p.m. each day).
  • Smart Use: Smart Actions for Using your Health Insurance Wisely. This workshop focuses on seven key actions for consumers to take, including keeping track of the health care they receive, reviewing their bills carefully and disputing errors, understanding deductibles and co-pays, and more. It is being offered November 2 and December 8 (6 p.m. each day).

Understanding key health insurance principles can save you money year-round. It also gives you the confidence to ask useful questions about health costs and bills, and to make informed choices about when and where you receive the health care you need.

Pre-registration for the health insurance workshops is required.
Questions? Contact Barb Wollan or Brenda Schmitt. The flier is attached below if you’d like to share it with others.

These two workshops were developed by a team of experts from across the nation led by University of Maryland Extension. They are conducted locally by trained Iowa State University Extension and Outreach specialists.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Extra Utility Assistance Available to Iowans affected by COVID

Iowans who have experienced a COVID-related income loss any time since March 17, 2020 may be eligible for extra assistance with utility bills including electric, natural gas and water bills if they are at risk of disconnection. Many households whose incomes are above the regular guidelines for energy assistance may qualify for this help.

The Residential Utility Disruption Prevention Program went into effect about a week ago, with an application deadline of November 20, 2020.

Applicants must meet income guidelines (80% of median income, which is more generous than regular utility assistance), and must already have an unpaid utility bill. More eligibility details, as well as required documentation, are found at the program’s website.

You must apply on-line; if internet access is a problem, families are encouraged to get help from a trusted friend. A local Community Action Agency may also be able to help.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Managing Winter Heating Costs During the Pandemic

When prioritizing expenses, a major household bill is utilities (e.g., electricity, gas, water and sewer, landline and cell phone, and internet/cable). The highest utility cost is typically heating the home.

Plan for increasing home heating costs over the next six months. COVID-19 may increase these costs because many families are spending more time working and/or learning from home.

Average Iowa household utility expense of $2,580 varies widely according to the size of a home, climate, and utility usage patterns. Regardless of what you pay for utilities, there are ways to pay less. 

Step 1: Check Eligibility and Request Energy Assistance. The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) assists households with a portion of the home heating bills, particularly those facing disconnection or who have trouble paying their utility bill. Early applications for LIHEAP started October 1 (for elderly and disabled applicants), with November 1-April 30 as the annual application timeframe through a local community action agency.

A general overview of the LIHEAP program is available in multiple languages.  Information on where to apply, through your local Community Action Agency, is found on the Iowa Department of Human Rights website. It is generally necessary to call ahead for an appointment.

Step 2: Ask for A Winter Moratorium. You may avoid a utility shut-off during the “winter moratorium” if you apply for and qualify for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).

  • If you are certified eligible for LIHEAP, utilities cannot shut off your gas or electric services from November 1 through April 1.
  • You should try to pay as much as you can on your utility bills, even though you cannot be shut off, because the bills will come due in April. If you have made a good faith effort to pay throughout the winter, the utility company is more likely to work with you on a payment arrangement.

It is always best to keep making payments to the maximum extent possible during any period when your utility provider is prohibited from disconnecting your service. Making payments during the winter moratorium creates “good will” with the utility company (with whom you may be negotiating a payment plan) and also keeps the problem from getting worse.

Step 3: Manage Utility Bills

-Know How Much to Expect:  Ask your utility provider for how much the utility bill was last year for your home or apartment. Electric and Natural Gas average monthly costs start at $215 and go higher depending on the size of your home and weather conditions. Pay as much as you can afford monthly.

-Weatherize: Leaky or old windows can account for 10%-25% of heating costs due to warm air escaping. Replace windows with double-pane windows or installing storm windows. Get help from the Iowa Weatherization Assistance Program https://humanrights.iowa.gov/dcaa/weatherization

-Lower the Thermostat- Dial down the thermostat saves energy in the winter by setting the thermostat to 68°F while you’re awake and setting it lower while you’re asleep or away from home. Even one degree lower can make a difference.  Industry figures for every degree you turn down your thermostat (and leave it for 8 hours) you save between 1 and 3 percent of your heating bill.

To provide help in making decisions about bills and expenses, free financial consultations are available to all Iowa residents through ISU Extension and Outreach’s Human Sciences Specialists in Family Finance. We can help revise budgets, prioritize spending and link you to community resources. Find your local contact at our webpage or by contacting your County Extension Office.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Prioritizing Bills

What’s unique about the COVID-19 experience is the financial stress we’re also experiencing at the same time. My colleagues and I (all ISU Extension financial educators) are listening and learning from people facing financial challenges who contact us for unbiased information and ideas.

 “When the crisis hit, I was glad I knew how to pay attention to the most important bills. Obviously rent and groceries were our priority.”

What expenses should I pay in a time of crisis? Step One is to Separate your essential and non-essential expenses. Prioritize bills to keep you safe, help you survive and stay employed— they include: Food, medicine, rent or mortgage payments and utilities. Iowa Legal Aid recommends paying water and energy bills in full to avoid accumulating debt and facing potential utility service disconnection.

The second step is figuring out how much cash you must have to pay the essentials.  You’re responsible for paying all your expenses on time. When we don’t have enough to cover our needs consider building a short-term plan. This plan may involve paying some bills late and needs to consider the consequences of failing to pay certain bills.

Feeling more in control will be worth the time it takes to plan. Research shows that taking these steps builds financial confidence and reduces anxiety.

Establish a short-term plan and reduce the financial stress during these tough times by contacting an ISU Extension Family Finance Specialist near you to talk through ideas and find a place to start. You can also connect with your local educator by calling Iowa Concern 800-447-1985.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Tips for Shopping Online

On-line shopping has been increasing steadily for over a decade, and now, as COVID keeps people at home more, new users are entering the online shopping world. Do they know how to be a “smart shopper” in an on-line environment? This three-minute video from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) gives practical tips for how to efficiently compare product features and prices, find coupons, and make sure you’re dealing with a reputable seller.

When money is tight, finding a coupon or avoiding shipping costs makes a difference, but it’s easy to forget those steps. I’m a moderately-experienced online shopper and I learned some new tips; I also recognized some tips I’ve heard my very computer-literate adult children discuss.

The FTC “On Guard Online” website is devoted to helping consumers stay safe online, with videos, games for children and teens, and more. It’s definitely worth checking out!

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Laid Off? Health Insurance Options

It’s tough to live on reduced income after a reduction in hours or a job loss, but unemployment benefits can help to bridge that gap, at least for a while. The expanded eligibility and expanded benefit amount provided through federal legislation in response to COVID-19 has helped thousands of Iowans.

Losing employment (or even reduction in hours) often means that workers also lose their health insurance coverage. Depending on the situation, that loss may be even more disruptive than the loss of income. Fortunately, there are some good options available for obtaining affordable health insurance outside of your workplace.

Free Insurance. If your income is below a certain threshold, you may be eligible for free health coverage through the state, and you can apply at any time during the year. This coverage is available to everyone, regardless of whether they are disabled or have children in the home, thanks to the fact that Iowa signed on to the expanded Medicaid portion of the Affordable Care Act.  The income guidelines for this option depend on family size:  for a single individual, the 2020 income limit is nearly $17,000; for a family of four, it is nearly $35,000. There are some nuances in the recording of income, so even if your income is a little above the limit, it is worth applying – you may be eligible. ALSO – even if your income for the first six months of the year puts you over the limit, it is still worth applying if your situation has changed, because the income limits are considered on a month-by-month basis. To apply, contact the Department of Human Services at 855-889-7985.

Coverage for Children. Through Healthy and Well Kids in Iowa (Hawk-I), children and teens under age 19 are eligible for free or nearly-free health coverage up to much higher income levels, so if you are having trouble affording health insurance for your children use the same DHS phone number (855-889-7985) to inquire and apply.

Income too high for free coverage? There are still options! The high cost of health insurance often means that even those with average incomes may find it unaffordable. Through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you can find high-quality health insurance plans; you may be eligible for help in paying the premiums if you do not have access to an affordable employer plan and if your income is below a generous limit. The 2020 income limit here is $49,960 for a single individual, and $103,000 for a family of four. You will be expected to pay part of the premiums, based on your income, but the government will pay the rest. The Kaiser Family Foundation’s Health Insurance Subsidy Calculator will provide a good estimate of the help you might receive.  

To enroll mid-year in coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you must be eligible for a special enrollment period; generally that ends 60 days after your previous coverage ends. Learn more or enroll at www.healthcare.gov or by calling 800-318-2596. Many community health centers offer assistance in considering options and enrolling, as well. 

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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