“Forgive My Student Loan? But I just paid it off!”

Graphic from https:studentaid.gov

The announcement by President Biden last month about the new plan to forgive up to $10,000 (or $20,000, in some cases) of student loan debt has been great news for many Americans, but there may be people who are groaning instead of celebrating. If you are one of those people, I may have good news for you!

Here’s the kind of scenario that may have people groaning:
Jane Doe owed $5,500 on her student loans as of March 1, 2020. Even when the COVID-related “student loan pause” kicked in March 13, 2020, she kept making payments of $215/month, because her income stayed steady and she just wanted to be done with the loan. She made her final payment a month ago and celebrated being out of debt!

But then – on August 24 came the announcement that she would be eligible to have up to $10,000 in student loans cancelled! GROAN…. “Oh if only I hadn’t made those payments – I would have been out of debt anyway, and I could’ve saved that $215/month!”

Here’s the good news: Jane Doe can apply to her loan servicer for a refund of the payments she made voluntarily during the student loan pause! And THEN she can apply for up to $10,000 of loan cancellation. In some cases the refund may occur automatically. Note: she will only be eligible for $5,500 loan cancellation because that’s what her balance was when the pandemic hit. The debt cancellation is “up to” $10,000, but if your loan balance is less than $10,000, the cancellation is limited by the amount of your debt.

Did you continue to make payments on your student loans during the student loan pause (administrative forbearance) that began March 13, 2020?  You can apply to get those payments refunded to you, and if you’re eligible for student loan cancellation, you may WISH to request a refund if those payments brought your loan balance below $10,000. Contact your loan servicer to start that process.

THEN, stay tuned for information on how to apply for the debt cancellation. The government expects the application to open in early October. To verify that you are eligible for the loan cancellation AND to minimize administrative glitches, check step one and follow step two provided by Federal Student Aid.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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URGENT – Mortgage Forbearance Deadlines this Week!

We mentioned Mortgage Forbearance earlier as a helpful tool for homeowners who are having trouble with their mortgage payments. Forbearance is when your mortgage servicer or lender allows you to pause or reduce your mortgage payments for a limited time while you build back your finances. The CARES Act (passed back in April of 2020) required that when a mortgage is backed by a Federal Agency, the borrower is automatically eligible for 3-6 months of forbearance if they are experiencing financial hardship resulting (directly OR indirectly) from COVID-19. Forbearance creates a helpful reprieve for struggling families.

The deadline to apply for forbearance under the CARES Act is September 30, 2021 IF your mortgage is backed by HUD/FHA, USDA, or the VA! That means NOW is the time for action. NOTE: if your loan is backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, there is not currently a deadline for requesting an initial forbearance.

Not Sure About Your Mortgage? Contact your mortgage company and ask them about your mortgage — asked if was backed by any of the agencies listed above. It that answer is “yes,” and if you are struggling with payments and bills, apply right away: ask your mortgage company to provide the needed application materials.

What does it mean to have your mortgage “backed” by a government agency? That simply means that when you bought your home, you qualified for special terms – often a lower down payment, reduced fees, or preferential interest rate thanks to a government program. I remember that when I bought my first house it was an FHA Loan; many first-time homebuyers qualify for special terms, and others do as well. If you are not sure, there is no harm in asking!

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau provides more information about forbearance. Financial assistance for homeowners at imminent risk of foreclosure may be available as well; the Iowa Finance Authority provides more information, about help that is currently available, and notes that more assistance, authorized under the American Rescue Plan Act, will be available within the next several months.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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There’s Still Time to Ask for Mortgage Help

COVID-19 has reduced the incomes of SO many Iowans, making basic survival harder. If you are worried about protecting your home if you are unable to make your mortgage payments, you may have options – but you won’t know unless you ask! Watch this video from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for the facts you need to know about mortgage forbearance.

Woman standing in lobby with text "COVID-19 Mortgage Relief: 4 Things to Know"

The CARES Act requires that consumers be offered at least 180 days “forbearance” if their mortgage is backed by a federal agency (FHA, VA, USDA, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac). Many lenders are also making forbearance available for privately-backed loans. You will eventually need to make up for the missed payments, but you will have some time to catch up. Beware of any housing relief offers that require you to pay a fee up front – those are likely scams.

For more information about housing relief options, visit cfpb.gov/housing. For help sorting through your options on a wide range of financial issues, request an individual consultation with one of our ISU Extension family finance specialists.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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