Negotiating For Remote Work

Is Remote Work for You? 

Do you feel limited by the lack of career opportunities in your rural community? Are your skills being underutilized in your current position? Are the only job opportunities miles away from your hometown? Remote work or telecommuting allows you to work from anywhere without leaving your community! Register before July 28 to participate in the August Remote Work Certificate course. The course begins August 2.

I participated in the Remote Work Certificate course in November of 2019 because the idea of not having to travel for work in the winter appealed to me. A year later, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach became an affiliate member of the Remote Online Initiative of Utah State University…all before we fully knew the impact COVID was going to have on Iowa.

Remote work is challenging. Team work is especially difficult when teams are not in the same physical location. It affects communication, brainstorming, and problem-solving and Supervisors need to adjust how they manage their remote teams. To date, 18 Human Sciences Extension and Outreach specialists at Iowa State University have completed this professional development course, assisting with their transition to a remote workplace. The educational programming in Family Life, Nutrition and Finance did not slow when we were all sent home to work.

With approximately a fourth of the FY20 program year affected by COVID-19 and the Derecho, Human Sciences Extension and Outreach provided educational information and programs in nutrition and wellness, family life, and family finance across the state, resulting in over 93,000 direct contacts. 5,284 participants attended online mental health/stress related offerings.

Nationwide, the drive to get employees back into offices is clashing with workers who’ve embraced remote work as the new normal. The pandemic may be winding down, but that does not mean all will return to full-time commuting and packed office buildings. The greatest accidental experiment in the history of labor has lessons to teach us about productivity, flexibility, and even reversing the brain drain.

Currently, employers are facing pressure to adjust their workplace policies, if just to reflect shifting attitudes toward remote work among other tech giants. There has never been a more opportune time to negotiate remote or flexible work arrangements with your boss. In this online workshop, Dr. Paul Hill, Extension professor with Utah State University, will present the evidence-based steps to help you prepare for successful negotiation for remote or flexible work arrangements with your boss. Register to join Dr. Hill on Wednesday, July 21 at 1 PM CDT for this free webinar at Negotiating Your Remote Work Arrangements Tickets, Wed, Jul 21, 2021 at 12:00 PM | Eventbrite.

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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Side-Hustle or Remotely Employed?

Many Americans have looked at new ways to make a living due to the pandemic undermining some traditional employment options. In a post-pandemic world, many job seekers will look towards the gig economy for answers.

The gig economy has been around for a while. You will have noticed these individuals in your community as self-employed individuals who mow lawns, deliver papers, provide childcare or work temporarily on your farm during harvest.  More recently, though, technology has removed a lot of barriers to high-paying, full-time and part-time remote employment.  Some of these jobs will require a degree while others require only the many skills and knowledge you already possess.

If you are looking into or already committed to earning a living in the gig economy, you will most likely find yourself in the following statistics.

  • 57.3 million people freelance in the U.S. It’s estimated that by 2027 there will be 86.5 million freelancers. (Upwork)
  • 36% of U.S. workers participate in the gig economy through either their primary or secondary jobs. (Gallup)
  • For 44% of gig workers, their work in the gig economy is their primary source of income. (Edison Research)
  • For 53% of gig workers aged 18-34, their work in the gig economy is their primary source of income. (Edison Research)
  • Gig employees are more likely to be young, with 38% of 18-34-year-olds being part of the gig economy. (Edison Research)

If becoming part of the gig economy is in your future, there are a few things to remember:

  • Keep on top of your paperwork
  • Set aside money for taxes
  • Contribute to an IRA
  • Make use of tax deductions.

Brenda Schmitt

A Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Field Specialist helping North Central Iowans make the most of their money.

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