Funeral Assistance in COVID Deaths: Avoid Scams

If you lost a loved one to COVID-19, you may be eligible for a government program that pays for funeral expenses. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will pay up to $9,000 for funeral expenses for loved ones who died of COVID-19. Survivors can apply for benefits by contacting FEMA, toll-free, at 844-684-6333. To find out if you qualify, read FEMA’s Funeral Assistance FAQs.

Unfortunately, FEMA reports that scammers are contacting people and pretending to offer to register them for assistance. To avoid those scams, here are some tips:

  • FEMA will not contact you until you call or apply for assistance.
  • The government won’t ask you to pay anything to get this benefit. 
  • Don’t give your own or your deceased loved one’s personal or financial information to anyone who contacts you out of the blue.

If you think you got a scam call, hang up and report it to the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 or the Federal Trade Commission at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

Source: Reprinted from CFPB news. They also provide information about other scams, including general scams as well as other COVID-related scams.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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Beware: Vaccine Scams

Like anything else that is new, the COVID vaccine is likely to be followed quickly by vaccine-related scams as well as misinformation. Likely scams to watch for:

  • Opportunities to “move higher on the list” by paying a fee. Truth: the vaccine roll-out is being carefully monitored, and there will be no way to get the vaccine quicker.
  • Any contact or news suggesting you pay a fee to receive the vaccine. Truth: due to the need to get as many people vaccinated as possible, you are likely to have no out-of-pocket cost when getting the vaccine.
  • Any contact asking for your social security number, bank account information or credit card number in order to schedule a vaccination. Truth: it is NEVER wise to give out personal or financial information when you did not initiate the contact.
  • Alternative “cures,” treatments,” or “preventives” for sale while you wait your turn for the vaccine. Truth: it is never wise to accept health advice or purchase health products from anyone other than a reputable health provider. Contact your own provider before purchasing any product or service.

Along with the potential for scams, the arrival of a vaccine creates opportunity for misinformation. Rely on trustworthy sources. For health information related to COVID-19, consult www.coronavirus.gov or www.coronavirus.iowa.gov. Both of these sites draw information directly from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other reputable sources.

Source: Federal Trade Commission

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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