“Forgive My Student Loan? But I just paid it off!”

Graphic from https:studentaid.gov

The announcement by President Biden last month about the new plan to forgive up to $10,000 (or $20,000, in some cases) of student loan debt has been great news for many Americans, but there may be people who are groaning instead of celebrating. If you are one of those people, I may have good news for you!

Here’s the kind of scenario that may have people groaning:
Jane Doe owed $5,500 on her student loans as of March 1, 2020. Even when the COVID-related “student loan pause” kicked in March 13, 2020, she kept making payments of $215/month, because her income stayed steady and she just wanted to be done with the loan. She made her final payment a month ago and celebrated being out of debt!

But then – on August 24 came the announcement that she would be eligible to have up to $10,000 in student loans cancelled! GROAN…. “Oh if only I hadn’t made those payments – I would have been out of debt anyway, and I could’ve saved that $215/month!”

Here’s the good news: Jane Doe can apply to her loan servicer for a refund of the payments she made voluntarily during the student loan pause! And THEN she can apply for up to $10,000 of loan cancellation. In some cases the refund may occur automatically. Note: she will only be eligible for $5,500 loan cancellation because that’s what her balance was when the pandemic hit. The debt cancellation is “up to” $10,000, but if your loan balance is less than $10,000, the cancellation is limited by the amount of your debt.

Did you continue to make payments on your student loans during the student loan pause (administrative forbearance) that began March 13, 2020?  You can apply to get those payments refunded to you, and if you’re eligible for student loan cancellation, you may WISH to request a refund if those payments brought your loan balance below $10,000. Contact your loan servicer to start that process.

THEN, stay tuned for information on how to apply for the debt cancellation. The government expects the application to open in early October. To verify that you are eligible for the loan cancellation AND to minimize administrative glitches, check step one and follow step two provided by Federal Student Aid.

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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College Students and Money: Discretionary spending adds up

This is the fourth in a series this week about financial issues faced by students in college and trade schools. Yesterday’s post discussed discretionary spending. Today we share an example that can help students as they consider how much they will spend on discretionary items.

Suppose Student A and Student B are financially identical, except Student A spends $450 a month on discretionary spending and Student B spends $150 a month. Student A spends $300/month more on discretionary expenses through four years of college (I’m including summers too, since most students continue having discretionary spending through the summer). When four years are over, suppose Student B has total student loan balance of $20,000. Since they were identical except for discretionary spending, that means Student A’s total student loan debt will be $34,400, or $14,400 more than Student B.

The current interest rate on federal student loans is 3.73% per year. Let’s suppose they repay their loans using the standard 10-year repayment plan, although there are other plans available with longer repayment terms and lower monthly payments. On the 10-year plan, Student B will pay $200/month. Student A, on the other hand, will pay $345/month. 

As fresh college graduates, will Student A be ready to deal with a monthly loan payment of $345, instead of a payment of $200? That extra $145 student loan payment is the consequence of their extra college spending; extra spending during college limits their options in the future. Understanding the consequences of their actions helps students make informed decisions they can live with in the long run.

What’s the “right” decision on discretionary spending? Only the student can decide. I have heard of college juniors and seniors who look back on their spending in their first one or two years of school and regret it. Of course there may be others who look back at how little they spent and wish they had let themselves have a little more fun.

When considering how much total educational debt you are willing to accumulate, consider two rules:

  • Borrow as little as you can. This is in bold, because I think of this as the “golden rule” about student debt. This rule applies in virtually every situation, and is above any other rules.
  • Avoid borrowing more (total) than your expected first year’s salary. This is a commonly accepted “rule of thumb.” Example: if you hope to start out as a civil engineer making $60,000, then $60,000 should be the MAXIMUM you are willing to borrow for your education.
    Notice: this doesn’t mean you should go ahead and spend extra because “you can afford” to borrow $60,000. The golden rule is above all other rules – no matter what, it is wise to borrow as little as you can.

Tomorrow – the last in our series “College Students and Money.” Do you think the subject of credit cards will come up?

Barb Wollan

Barb Wollan's goal as a Family Finance program specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is to help people use their money according to THEIR priorities. She provides information and tools, and then encourages folks to focus on what they control: their own decisions about what to do with the money they have.

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