Monday Hay Auction Report

Rock Valley Hay Auction report for Monday, Mar 6, 2017

Receipts:  29 loads    Last Week:  32 loads    Year Ago:   39 Loads

Compared to last week:  Alfalfa hay slightly higher, lower quality grass hay offered and market lower as well.  Prices dollars per ton, except where noted.  All sales FOB Rock Valley, Iowa, vicinity.

Alfalfa:  Good:  Large Rounds, 2 loads 90.00.  Fair:  Large Rounds and Squares, 7 loads 75.00-85.00.  Utility:  Large Rounds, 1 load 60.00.

Grass:  Premium:  Large Rounds, 1 load 105.00.  Good:  Small Squares, 1 load 90.00.  Fair:  Large Rounds and Squares, 10 loads 60.00-77.50.

Utility:  Large Rounds, 5 loads 50.00-57.50.

Straw:  Large Rounds, 1 load 57.50.

Corn Stalks:  Large Rounds, 1 load 37.50.

MDA/ISDA Intern Applications Due March 17

2017 MIDWEST DAIRY ASSOCIATION INDUSTRY RELATIONS IOWA SUMMER INTERN

The Midwest Dairy Association Industry Relations Internship Program provides an excellent opportunity for students interested in communications, public relations, marketing, food science or agribusiness. The intern must positively represent Midwest Dairy Association objectives as they gain practical experience in communication, public relations and marketing programs for dairy products.

POSITION AVAILABLE

ANKENY, IOWA:  Position located in the Ankeny program office.  Approximate dates:  June 1 – late August.

ELIGIBILITY:

  1. MUST BE A STUDENT THAT IS PERMANENT RESIDENT OF IOWA, MINNESOTA, NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, MISSOURI, ILLINOIS, KANSAS, NEBRASKA, OKLAHOMA OR ARKANSAS OR BE A STUDENT ENROLLED IN A COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY IN ONE OF THESE STATES.
  1. MUST BE AT LEAST 18 YEARS OLD ON JANUARY 1, 2017.
  1. MUST BE AVAILABLE FOR SHORT-TERM EMPLOYMENT OF THE MIDWEST DAIRY FROM APPROXIMATELY JUNE 1 – LATE AUGUST, 2017
  1. MUST HAVE AN INTEREST IN COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND/OR THE DAIRY INDUSTRY.
  1. MUST LOCATE IN OR NEAR ANKENY, AND HAVE RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION.

A PREFERENCE WILL BE GIVEN TO APPLICANTS WITH:

  1. EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS, INCLUDING WRITING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING.
  2. STRONG ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS, MATURITY AND THE ABILITY TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY.
  3. FAMILIARITY WITH THE DAIRY INDUSTRY, STATE FAIRS AND, WHERE APPLICABLE, DAIRY PRINCESS PROGRAMS.
  4. A BACKGROUND OR INTEREST IN MARKETING OR AGRICULTURE.
  5. COMPUTER EXPERIENCE.

SELECTION

  1. APPLICANTS MUST SUBMIT, VIA E-MAIL,  A RESUME, AND A TWO-PAGE, TYPED, DOUBLE-SPACED WRITTEN ESSAY DESCRIBING TWO NEW INITIATIVES THAT COULD HELP MIDWEST DAIRY BEST SERVE ITS DAIRY PRODUCER FUNDERS TO DRIVE PRODUCT SALES AND/OR ENHANCE DAIRY PRODUCER IMAGE, AND A LIST OF THREE REFERENCES INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, CURRENT AND FORMER EMPLOYERS.

THESE E-MAILED APPLICATIONS ARE DUE MARCH 17, 2017.  PLEASE E-MAIL ALL APPLICATIONS TO:

SUE ANN CLAUDON AT SACLAUDON@MIDWESTDAIRY.COM AND
MITCH SCHULTE MSCHULTE@MIDWESTDAIRY.COM

FINALISTS WILL BE NOTIFIED FOR INTERVIEWS BY MARCH 24, 2017.  The intern will assume a salaried internship at the Ankeny office location and must be prepared to reside within commuting distance of the job responsibilities.

2017 MIDWEST DAIRY INDUSTRY RELATIONS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

Program Objectives

  1. PROVIDE AN OUTSTANDING YOUNG ADULT THE OPPORTUNITY TO POSITIVELY REPRESENT AND WORK ON BEHALF OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IN ORDER TO ADVANCE MIDWEST DAIRY’S CORPORATE OBJECTIVES.
  1. PROVIDE A CHALLENGING, EDUCATIONAL AND REWARDING OPPORTUNITY FOR A PERSON TO GAIN A PRACTICAL EDUCATION ABOUT THE FUNCTION OF BUSINESS, SPECIFICALLY THE MARKETING AND GENERIC PROMOTION OF REAL DAIRY PRODUCTS.  THIS PROGRAM ALSO PROVIDES THE INTERN WITH PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES.
  1. GENERATE ASSISTANCE (HUMAN RESOURCES) TO IMPLEMENT MIDWEST DAIRY’S PROGRAM OF WORK.
  1. INTRODUCE POTENTIAL FUTURE EMPLOYEES TO MIDWEST DAIRY, AND POSITION THE ASSOCIATION AS A POTENTIAL FUTURE EMPLOYER TO INTERNS AND CANDIDATES.
  1. PROVIDE CONSTRUCTIVE INPUT ABOUT THE ORGANIZATION’S PROGRAMMING AND OPERATIONS, SPECIFICALLY ABOUT THE INTERNSHIP PROGRAM AND ITS POTENTIAL VALUE FOR UPCOMING YEARS.
  1. BUILD AWARENESS IN THE ACADEMIC AND AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITIES OF MIDWEST DAIRY AS AN ORGANIZATION THAT OFFERS INTERESTING AND REWARDING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES.  IT ALSO ALLOWS THE ASSOCIATION TO BUILD RAPPORT WITH ACADEMIC AND AGRICULTURAL LEADERS WHO MAY LEND ASSISTANCE/RECOMMENDATIONS WHEN THE ASSOCIATION FILLS PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS.

Position Description

Term:  Three months approximately June 1 – through late August

This experiential learning opportunity is short-term (summer) employment based in the Ankeny, Iowa office.  During the summer program, the intern will be a paid employee of Midwest Dairy, earning $4,600 for three months, but will not be eligible for any benefits other than those provided to all employees under applicable law.  The intern will work full-time hours, which may include some weekends, and unlimited hours during the applicable state fair responsibilities. Some flexibility in start dates, or during the employment period, is allowed.

RESPONSIBILITIES MAY INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

  • ASSIST WITH THE WRITING, DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF MEDIA MATERIALS.
  • WORK WITH INDUSTRY RELATIONS MANAGER TO IDENTIFY AND DEVELOP OTHER PROMOTIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS AND DISPLAYS FOR USE AT STATE FAIRS.
  • WRITE REGULAR INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL MIDWEST DAIRY ASSOCIATION PUBLICATIONS VIA MIDWEST DAIRY NEWS.
  • ASSIST SPECIFIC MIDWEST DAIRY STAFF MEMBERS WITH PROGRAMS UNIQUE TO THEIR STATE, SUCH AS: FARM TOURS AND OPEN HOUSES; DAIRY PRINCESS PROGRAMS; SOCIAL MEDIA EFFORTS; AND JUNE DAIRY MONTH AND SIMILAR PROMOTION ACTIVITIES.
  • ASSIST WITH PLANNING AND ONSITE IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE FAIR ACTIVITIES.
  • PERFORM MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT FUNCTIONS INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, REPORT WRITING, ORDERING MATERIALS AND COLLECTING INFORMATION.
  • PERFORM OTHER TASKS AS ASSIGNED.

RELATIONSHIPS

  1. DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE TO AND REPORTS TO A MEMBER OF THE INDUSTRY RELATIONS TEAM.
  2. PARTICIPATES IN THE STATE FAIR PROJECT TEAM.
  3. WORKS UNDER THE DIRECTION/SUPERVISION OF PROJECT LEADERS ON SPECIFIC PROJECTS.

REPORTING

  1. WEEKLY ITINERARY AND ACTIVITY REPORTS.
  2. EXPENSE REPORTS AS NEEDED ACCORDING TO ASSOCIATION POLICY.
  3. MONTHLY MILEAGE REPORTS AS NEEDED ACCORDING TO ASSOCIATION POLICY.
  4. PROGRAM/PROJECT UPDATES AS REQUESTED.
  5. COMPLETE A TIMESHEET.

Compensation

  1. RECEIVE $4,600 FOR THREE MONTHS PAID IN TWO-WEEK INCREMENTS.
  2. MILEAGE AND OTHER EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT ACCORDING TO ASSOCIATION POLICY.
  3. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION AND LIABILITY INSURANCE DURING SUMMER EMPLOYMENT.
  4. TRAINING AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES.
  5. COPIES OF COMPLETED PROJECTS, ARTICLES AND OTHER MATERIALS FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.

Other Provisions

  1. UPON SELECTION, THE INTERN MUST CERTIFY THAT HE OR SHE WILL BE AVAILABLE AND WILL PARTICIPATE IN THE ENTIRE APPLICABLE STATE FAIR.
  1. ALTHOUGH THE ASSOCIATION ANTICIPATES THE INTERNSHIP WILL LAST FOR APPROXIMATELY THREE MONTHS, NO SELECTED INTERN IS GUARANTEED TO HAVE HIS OR HER INTERNSHIP LAST FOR ANY PERIOD OF TIME.  THE ASSOCIATION RESERVES THE RIGHT TO END THE INTERNSHIP OF AN INDIVIDUAL AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON.  AGREEMENT BY AN INDIVIDUAL TO PARTICIPATE IN THE INTERNSHIP DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CONTRACT OR GUARANTEE OF EMPLOYMENT.
  1. THE ASSOCIATION RESERVES THE RIGHT TO DISCONTINUE THE PROGRAM IF NO QUALIFYING APPLICATIONS ARE RECEIVED AS DETERMINED BY THE ASSOCIATION OR FOR ANY OTHER REASON.
  1. FAMILY MEMBERS OF MIDWEST DAIRY DIRECTORS OR STAFF ARE INELIGIBLE FOR CONSIDERATION UNLESS THE MIDWEST DAIRY BOARD GRANTS A SPECIAL EXCEPTION.
  1. MUST BE ABLE TO PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK.

2017 Internship Work Activities

Assist with planning and participate in June Dairy Month activities to include:

  • JUNE DAIRY MONTH PROCLAMATION SIGNING EVENT
  • ISU OPEN HOUSE
  • NORTHEAST IOWA DAIRY FOUNDATION BREAKFAST ON THE FARM
  • JACKSON/CLINTON OPEN HOUSE
  • WIDA OPEN HOUSE
  • PARTICIPATE IN THE ISU 4-H DAIRY ROUNDUP

Additional activities include:

  • STATE FAIR PLANNING WITH EVENTS, ACTIVITIES AND EXHIBITS
  • COORDINATING DAIRY FARMER VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH ACTIVITIES AT THE STATE FAIR
  • WRITE PRESS RELEASES FOR 2017 IA DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS
  • ASSIST WITH PRESS RELEASES OR FEATURE STORIES RELATED TO IOWA DAIRY PRINCESS CONTEST
  • WRITE AND SUBMIT SUCCESS STORIES TO MIDWEST DAIRY NEWS
  • ASSIST WITH IOWA GAMES AND IOWA FOOD AND FAMILY PROJECT EVENTS
  • ATTEND COALITION MEETINGS WHEN APPLICABLE TO UNDERSTAND RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER COMMODITY GROUPS AND PARTNERS.

This is not meant to be a complete list.  It is only to be used as a guide to potential work activities for the internship position.

ISDA Scholarship Applications Due March 17

ISDA will be awarding 14 college scholarships of $500 each for the 2017 fall semester. To be eligible for a scholarship, you must be the child or grandchild of a current ISDA member OR be an employee or the child of an employee on a dairy farm which belongs to ISDA. Applicants must also be attending college full time (or plan to attend full time). If you are not currently an ISDA member or need to renew your membership, you can find a membership application at WWW.IOWADAIRY.ORG or contact Sue Ann Claudon, ISDA Executive Director at SUEANNC@IOWADAIRY.ORG  515-965-4626. When application and essay are totally complete, please email to SUEANNC@IOWADAIRY.ORG or mail to ISDA, Scholarship Application, 101 NE Trilein Dr., Ankeny, IA 50021

USDA Confirms HIPAI In Tennessee

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI) of North American wild bird lineage in a commercial chicken breeder flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This is the first confirmed case of HPAI in commercial poultry in the United States this year. The flock of 73,500 is located within the Mississippi flyway.

Samples from the affected flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested and confirmed at the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa

State officials quarantined the affected premises and birds on the property have been depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.

While no known links to dairy cattle are know, this is a good time for dairymen to review their biosecurity plans. In-depth information can be found at:

HTTP://WWW.WVDL.WISC.EDU/WP-CONTENT/UPLOADS/2013/01/WVDL.INFO_.BIOSECURITY_FOR_DAIRY_FARMS1.PDF

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)- the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

Dairy Beef Short Course Set for Mar. 28

The I-29 Moo University Collaborators will offer the third annual Dairy Beef Short Course on Tuesday, March 28 at the Denny Sanford Premier Center in Sioux Falls, SD. This is a Pre-Welcome Reception Educational Events at the Central Plains Dairy Expo.

Topics covered will include:

  • VACCINATION AND IMPLANT PROTOCOLS:WORKSHOP WILL COVER SELECTING THE RIGHT VACCINES AND IMPLANTS FOR YOUR OPERATION TO IMPROVE HERD HEALTH, OPTIMIZE PERFORMANCE, AND EXCEED CUSTOMER EXPECTATIONS. PRESENTED BY RUSS DALY, SDSU EXTENSION VETERINARIAN.
  • MANAGING LIVER ABSCESSES IN THE VFD AGE:PARTICIPANTS WILL LEARN ABOUT MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE ACIDOSIS AND LIVER ABSCESS ISSUES AND COMPLY WITH THE VFD REGULATIONS. PRESENTED BY WARREN RUSCHE, SDSU EXTENSION BEEF FEEDLOT SPECIALIST.
  • MARKETING DAIRY BEEF IN 2017:THIS WORKSHOP WILL FOCUS ON ISSUES SURROUNDING MARKETING DAIRY BEEF, INCLUDING MARKET ACCESS, PRICE DISCOVERY, INCREASED RED MEAT SUPPLY, AND END PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS. PRESENTED BY BRAD KOOIMA, PRESIDENT KOOIMA & KAEMINGK COMMODITIES, INC.
  • FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND WORKING WITH LENDERS:THIS WORKSHOP WILL PROVIDE ATTENDEES WITH INSIGHT INTO WHAT BANKERS ARE LOOKING FOR AS THEY WORK WITH CATTLE FEEDERS. PRESENTED BY DAVE KARNOPP, RETAIL COMMERCIAL LENDER/BEEF SPECIALIST – FARM CREDIT SERVICES.

The Dairy Beef Short Course begins 10 a.m. with registration; program starts at 10:30 a.m. and will end at 3 p.m.

The agenda will allow for attendees to take in the evening entertainment at the Welcome Reception for the Central Plains Dairy Expo.

To cover costs, there will be a $25 registration fee which will include lunch. Registrations deadline is March 27 to insure a spot at the meeting, since attendance is limited to 80 people. Please contact the Watertown Regional Extension Office at 605.882.5140 or register by email at:

Tracey.Erickson@sdstate.edu

In its twelfth year of collaboration, I-29 Moo University has established a learning community which is a cooperative effort of South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, and Nebraska University Extension personnel along with the SW Minnesota Dairy Profit Initiative, Iowa State Dairy Association, Minnesota Milk Producers Association, Nebraska State Dairy Association, and the South Dakota Dairy Producers. The objective of various educational venues offered is to bring research-based information to stakeholders while helping to grow a sustainable agricultural industry.

For more information check at: HTTP://IGROW.ORG/EVENTS/I-29-MOO-UNIVERSITY-DAIRY-BEEF-SHORT-COURSE/#STHASH.7BBI9UUS.DPUF

Hay Market Report

ROCK VALLEY HAY AUCTION FOR MONDAY, FEB 27, 2017

Receipts:  32 loads    Last Week:  31 loads    Year Ago:   39 Loads

Compared to last week:  Market was sharply lower with quality average to poor.

One load Small Squares equals approximately 5 tons; Large Squares and Large Rounds range from 10-25 tons per load.

Alfalfa:  Good:  Large Squares, 1 load 95.00.  Fair:  Large Squares, 6 loads 70.00-77.50; Large Rounds, 9 loads 65.00-82.50.

Alfalfa/Grass Mixed:  Fair:  Large Rounds, 2 loads 60.00-77.50.

Grass:  Good:  Small Squares, 1 load 90.00.  Fair:  Large Squares, 1 laod 70.00; Large Rounds, 4 loads 65.00-85.00.  Utility:  Large Rounds, 2 loads 55.00-62.50.

Straw:  Large Rounds, 1 load 70.00.

Corn Stalks:  Large Rounds, 4 loads 35.00-45.00, mostly 40.00-45.00.

Bean Stubble:  Large Rounds, 1 load 35.00.

Senators Hear Dairy Issues at First Farm Bill Reauthorization Hearing

On Thursday, the first Senate Farm Bill Reauthorization hearing webinar was hosted in at the Sioux county Extension office. Those attending heard testimony and questions from a wide range of producers and industry representatives.

A consistent theme heard from the presenters was the continuation of the crop insurance, conservation programs (especially EQIP) and a need for more transparency in price determination for the beef industry.

Lynda Foster from Foster Dairy in Fort Scott Kansas voiced her concerns for the upcoming farm bill discussion focusing on three issues.

She noted, in 2014, Congress passed legislation establishing a new safety net under Title I for dairy farmers. During the legislative process, changes were made to the original dairy program designed by NMPF and other dairy leaders around the country. Unfortunately, the safety net, known as the Margin Protection Program for Dairy Producers (MPP), has failed to provide the level of protection envisioned in the original program.

She pointed out that in the first year, there farm signed up for the program and purchased supplemental coverage at the $6.00 level. And like others, since that first year they have only enrolled at the minimal $4 margin level. “…to be perfectly honest, Senator, is meaningless. MPP remains the right model for the future of our industry, but changes are needed if Congress wants to provide relevant tools to our sector…” she stated.  She continued noting that many dairy farmers participating in the MPP have become disenchanted with the program. In calendar year 2015, dairy farmers paid $70 million into the MPP program and received $730 thousand. In 2016, those figures were $20 million and $13 million, in a year where more program support was needed.

During the lead-up to the 2014 Farm Bill, she explained the process to develop a model for average feed costs for dairy cows. This process took nearly a year and included industry experts who understand the real cost of feeding cows. When it was presented to Congress, the formula, while respected as being accurate, was cut by 10 percent. This cut resulted in a skewed margin program, a flawed calculation for MPP and a much less useful program.

As a result of this change, a number of farmers who purchased higher coverage levels in 2015 did not opt to do so in 2016 because of the likelihood of no payment during times of need.

Since its inception, she pointed out that MPP has actually made the government a profit, equal to $66 million in fiscal year 2015 and $37 million in fiscal year 2016, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

She continued by pointing out that unlike other sectors in agriculture, Congress arbitrarily limited the ability of dairy producers to use Risk Management Agency (RMA) products as well as Title I programs. Although all other commodities can use both RMA and Title I programs without any restrictions, dairy farmers cannot use the Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy Cattle (LGM) program, which remains a popular tool for producers. Due to restrictions in MPP, a producer must decide at the beginning of the Farm Bill cycle whether to cover their milk under LGM or the MPP. This restriction leaves dairy farmers without the tools that other farmers have at their disposal regarding federal support for their operations.

Foster also stressed the importance of a dependable labor force to the dairy industry. She quoted a Texas A&M report stating 51 percent of all dairy farm workers are foreign born, and the farms that employ them account for 79 percent of the milk produced in the United States. She then asked, “How are dairies like mine, or any others, supposed to operate if we do not have access to a reliable workforce? In dairy, we cannot turn the cows off when there are not enough employees to do the job, we have to milk them.” She urged the Senators to act immediately to reform our immigration system in a manner that addresses agriculture’s needs for a legal and stable workforce.

One of her final points was how the dairy industry has come a long way on trade in the past several years. Our nation has gone from exporting dairy products valued at less than $1 billion in 2000 to exporting a record $7.1 billion in 2014, an increase of 625 percent. Fifteen years ago the USA was exporting roughly five percent of its milk production, now we are at three times that level, even as overall U.S. milk production has continued to grow. That means the equivalent of one day’s milk production each week from the entire U.S. dairy industry ultimately ends up overseas, making exports integral to the health of my farm and our dairy industry at large. It is critical that Congress protects the progress we have made as the Administration updates trade agreements like the North American Free Trade Agreement.

The complete testimony of each presented is available at:

HTTP://WWW.AGRICULTURE.SENATE.GOV/HEARINGS/HEARING-FROM-THE-HEARTLAND-PERSPECTIVES-ON-THE-2018-FARM-BILL-FROM-KANSAS

US Losing Dairy Farms Above Trend Line

Hoard’s Dairyman dairy news reports that tight margins that ranged from $5.76 to $9.17 per hundredweight after feed costs were among the reasons that more dairy farmers exited the industry last year. Those business closings were only the fourth time in the past decade that 4 percent or more of dairy farmers called it quits.

As the industry continues to lose dairy farms, cow number remain robust as the national dairy herd reached a 20-year high of 9.328 million cows last year.

Given these two trends in recent USDA statistics, it goes without saying that dairy cows and farms continue to consolidate into clusters. When evaluating the top 10 dairy states as measured by total dairy farms, that group only lost 3.7 percent of its farms last year. Each state in that group also had 1,000 or more dairy farms. For the remaining 40 states, losses totaled a more brisk 4.9 percent.

Farm Bill Hearing Live Webinar Set for Feb. 23 at 2 P.M. In Orange City

Orange City- The first hearing in the country on the 2018 Farm Bill re-authorization will be held at 2 p.m. on Feb. 23 on the Kansas State campus in Manhattan, KS.

Beth Doran and Fred M. Hall, Northwest Iowa livestock and dairy specialists will host the live webinar at the Sioux County Extension office. No registration is required, but seating will be on a first come basis. While those attending will be able hear the questions and testimony, if they would like to submit written testimony they will be able to email comments to the ag committee. This is the first of eight hearing to be held across the country.

Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture Nutrition and Forestry U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts says lawmakers need clear direction from producers on what is working and what isn’t working in farm country.

For more information contact the Sioux County Extension office at 712.737.4230.

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