It’s Never Too Late to Say Thank You

Mom reading a book to two children.
For many families, the last week or so may have been filled with gift giving and celebrations including good food and holiday cheer. When others spend so much time, preparing just the right holiday celebration, a hearty thank you is in order! So before the New Year rings, how about helping your children learn the skill of giving thanks to the people in your family and those friends who have made the last few days very special for all! Giving thanks has never gone out of style! In fact, good manners are reflected in the thanks that are expressed!

We often take for granted the people that mean the most to us. With out the preparation by mom and dad and extended family members, who work overtime to get the house ready, the presents purchased and wrapped, the groceries bought and delicious meals cooked, the holidays would lack that something special, they always seem to have!.
Giving thanks can take many forms. Writing a note, talking by phone, listening and sharing conversation with someone face to face! The effort we make in showing thanks will spread cheer and good will for many holidays to come!
If you are trying to teach children about writing thank you notes, here are a few helpful hints:

Greeting: Dear Aunt Karen,
Express thanks: Thank you for the new books and puzzles. I love reading.
Discuss use: I can share the puzzles when my friends come over to play.
Say it again: Thank you for remembering me with this gift.
Regards: Love, Susie

So get busy, get yourself some stationery, plain note cards or a selection of attractive postcards, and proper postage. Store all of these items somewhere easily accessible and preferably in plain sight, so you won’t forget! People like being appreciated, and if they feel you actually notice the nice things they do for you, they’re more likely to repeat their generosity.

Barb Dunn Swanson

Barb Dunn Swanson

With two earned degrees from Iowa State University, Barb is a Human Sciences Specialist utilizing her experience working alongside communities to develop strong youth and families! With humor and compassion, she enjoys teaching, listening and learning to learn!

More Posts

Follow Me:
Twitter

First a ‘Thank-You’ and then Our January 2017 Topic Punishment vs Discipline

Welcome to January 2017.

Our Science of Parenting team wanted to take just a moment to say ‘thank-you’. Thank-you for continuing to spend time with us here on our blog. Thank-you for sharing your thoughts and ideas with us and thank-you for supporting our efforts to provide research based information for parents. We appreciate the messages you have sent us throughout the year and we look forward to sharing more time together with you in 2017.

We decided to start 2017 off with a topic that several of our faculty are currently researching. Punishment vs Discipline.

What’s the difference you might be asking? Great question.

When it comes to raising children, we often find parents confused on what do to when it comes to punishment or discipline. In looking at the definitions, we see a stark contrast in the two words. Punishment-to inflict injury on versus discipline-training that corrects.

This month at the Science of Parenting we are going to dive into those two words and review the research that has been done by faculty and students right here at Iowa State.

We look forward to sharing with you!

January 2017 Podcast Script

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Mother of three. Lover of all things child development related. Fascinated by temperament and brain development. Professional background with families, child care providers, teachers and community service entities.

More Posts

Thank you from Science of Parenting

I thought this might be a perfect ‘blip’ in our regular blogging timeline to say THANK YOU for reading our blog. We enjoy reading your emails and comments back to us and appreciate your insight.  Thank you for sharing our blog with others. We are grateful for the trust you have in our information. As a way to say thank you, I wanted to take a moment to share the other great blogs my co-workers have been working on.

When I went to our ISU Extension and Outreach blog homepage, I was reminded how much fabulous educational information is right there at my fingertips! A blog on Iowa vegetables? Where did that come from? And all that great information on connecting to the environment! I needed some connecting! Oh yes, and the Answer Line! how could I forget that one? We ALL need answers!

I’m not sure about you, but I must also take this moment to confess that I am starting to look for my educational information in bite-sized pieces. Smaller snippets of information designed to grab my attention and then draw me in to the deeper stuff.  Educational blogs represent bite-sized information for me. Bite sized is important but my ‘bites’ also need to be from reliable, valid and trustworthy sources.

As I looked through the blogs that my co-workers create I couldn’t help but smile and think “Wow, that’s a whole lot of perfectly sized trustworthy education for the public right there!” And it’s for EVERYONE! It’s for child care providers, business owners, teachers, farmers and families in general! Perfect blog-sized, bite-sized pieces!

So, THANK YOU for reading and sharing our blog with others, we truly enjoy providing our blogs for you!

Now sit back and click a couple links, read a couple bites and enjoy the trustworthy, educational information.

 

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Mother of three. Lover of all things child development related. Fascinated by temperament and brain development. Professional background with families, child care providers, teachers and community service entities.

More Posts

Thank you, it’s a habit

30 days of thankfulness was something I saw on various social networking sites all month long. As I looked at our blog and the social network sites (and then the upcoming topic for December) I took a pause and wondered… Did the 30 days of thankfulness create a habit? Does our modeling of manners and respect create habits that stick with our children? With ourselves? Is my grammar really poor in these sentences? (Oops I digress)

And that’s where my mind stuck…. Habits. Aren’t we essentially trying teach our children positive social habits when it comes to manners, empathy, respect and even thankfulness?  Habits. Seems like such a negative word sometimes because we often focus on ‘bad habits’.   But what if we stopped and thought about our good habits. The ones we hope our children turn into their own?

Play along with me —

What are some of your good habits?

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Lori Hayungs, M.S.

Mother of three. Lover of all things child development related. Fascinated by temperament and brain development. Professional background with families, child care providers, teachers and community service entities.

More Posts

Subscribe to our blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner