Legacy: Going Forward

In our year-end video (Watch “Legacy: Looking Back, Looking Forward.”) we took a look back. It was a chance to think about how far we’ve come – and wonder how much further we can go.  I can feel the momentum building all around me. We’ve come a long way. And we are just beginning.

It’s powerful to remember the good things, to pull from our combined efforts and successes as we look ahead. In that frame of mind, I’d like to ask you to tuck these things away in a place where they are easily accessible to reflect upon:

  • Our work in ISU Extension and Outreach is for the public good, and our communities and families depend upon us.
  • We’re honored to serve our state – because Iowans believe education and partnerships are how you solve today’s problems and prepare for the future.
  • We are committed to carry out Abraham Lincoln’s – and now – Iowa State University Extension and Outreach’s legacy, that higher education should be practical and available to everyone.
  • In good times and in challenging times we continue to put the university’s research and resources to work for a strong Iowa.

Thank you for all your dedication, hard work, and service. Enjoy your holidays, and as we look forward to the New Year, we do so with anticipation, gratitude, and excitement. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

What Extension and Outreach Means to Us

What does it mean to you, personally, to be part of ISU Extension and Outreach? I asked that question of the leadership team recently and I’d like to share some of their answers.

To Debra Sellers, associate dean and director of Human Sciences Extension and Outreach, being part of ISU Extension and Outreach means “to engage with others in a shared vision of empowering people and growing lives, to contribute to a legacy that is larger than just myself, and to have a little fun along the way.”

Our budget analyst, John Flickinger, says, “I have the privilege to provide assistance to program leaders and staff so they can focus on educational and training opportunities for the citizens and communities of Iowa, our nation, and our world – opportunities that will enable youth, adults, business owners, and community leaders to make better choices for themselves, their families, and their overall lives. Even though my role is ‘indirect support,’ knowing the end product and our mission for ISU Extension and Outreach is what brings fulfillment to me.”

According to John Lawrence, associate dean and director of Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension and Outreach, “There is not just one thing, but rather many things that it means to me. Being part of ISU Extension and Outreach allows me to serve agriculture and Iowa. I get to participate and to make a difference. Being part of ISU Extension and Outreach allows me to work with and earn the respect of great people as colleagues and clients. I’m proud to be part of an organization that has and continues to impact people, policy, and the planet.”

Bob Dodds, assistant vice president for County Services, says, “Through education, ISU Extension and Outreach improves the lives of Iowans. I work for ISU Extension and Outreach because of this, but equally important, I learn each day with those we serve. I appreciate the opportunity to be innovative and create, and the opportunities are endless. I know firsthand the impact the land-grant mission has had on my life, my family, and my community. To be a part of the Iowa State land-grant mission is very rewarding. I truly believe the land-grant mission is as relevant today as it was when Lincoln signed the Morrill Act.”

We all could provide our own answers about what it means to be part of ISU Extension and Outreach. Take a moment to ask a colleague and be sure to ask yourself. It’s all good food for thought as we continue building a strong Iowa. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress. Remember to use #STRONGIOWA and share your stories on Twitter.

A Gift through Time

Cathann Kress touring USS IowaI recently spent some time out on the west coast with national meetings and conferences. Those of you who know my appreciation for history won’t be surprised to learn that I made a point of touring the USS Iowa, now permanently located in Long Beach as a museum. It’s impressive and I couldn’t help but ponder that I was standing where incredible leaders like President Franklin Delano Roosevelt once stood. The USS Iowa was known as the Battleship of Presidents because NO other battleship in our nation’s history has been host to more U.S. Presidents than the IOWA. Her other accolades include designation as the “World’s Greatest Naval Ship” due to her big guns, heavy armor, fast speed, longevity and modernization. She kept pace with technology for more than 50 years.

As part of the tour, I read an essay by Professor James Sefton of California State University on why the Battleship Iowa museum matters. In it, Professor Sefton argues that one of the most important elements of education is continuity and the way we learn how we are related to earlier generations. This reflection helps us begin to understand how their decisions and actions affect ours and helps us contemplate what we have done with their legacy.

Professor Sefton (and I’ll forgive him for this, since he’s a history professor) also argues that history is the most important vehicle for securing continuity and enables us to educate ourselves and secure our heritage for the future. Here’s where I respectfully disagree: History is not the most important vehicle, relationships are. History is the collective story of people and their relationships, that’s why I find it so fascinating.

Of course, this made me think about our collective work — our decisions and actions and what our legacy will be that future generations of Iowans will experience. I regularly think about a future Vice President for Extension and Outreach (someday way in the future) and hope that my decisions and actions today will make his or her job easier and more productive. A legacy is essentially a gift handed through time from the past to the future. It’s a vision, a hope, and a commitment rolled up into a series of actions and decisions and delivered years later. Those sailors serving aboard this battleship had a vision of a strong IOWA. So do we. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

Forward-Thinking People

When it comes to people, Iowa is a small state. With a population of 3 million, we’re just slightly bigger than Chicago. But more than 30 million acres of the world’s best agricultural land lies between the two rivers that make up our state’s borders. On it, we produce about 19 percent of the nation’s corn supply and 15 percent of the soybeans. In addition, Iowa produces nearly 30 percent of the pork, 22 percent of the eggs, and 2 percent of the milk: Talk about a complete breakfast! Not to be outdone, our state also produces 10 percent of the nation’s cattle, 3 percent of the turkeys, and a staggering array of yeast, enzymes, sweeteners, flavors, proteins, fibers, gelatins, and binders critical to the world’s food industry. And did I mention this? We produce about 25 percent of the nation’s ethanol.

We also produce special people. Iowa has been known for people who are ahead of their time, bolstered by common sense and determined to make life better for others. Have you ever heard of Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, or George Washington Carver? How about John Atanasoff, Black Hawk, or Carrie Chapman Catt? And then there’s Arthur Collins, of electronics fame; Jesse Field Shambaugh, the mother of 4-H; and Alexander Clark, who was tireless in his efforts to improve the lives of African Americans. And that’s only the short list, here are a few more.

Iowa is the state whose people first accepted the terms of the Land Grant Act, to create access to education for the common people; the state whose farmers engaged with their land-grant university to begin extension work. Iowa was home to American Indians who utilized domesticated plants more than 3,000 years ago, leading to flourishing settlements. This state provided a disproportionate number of our young men to fight in the Civil War and support President Lincoln. When Saigon fell in 1975 and pleas went out to U.S. governors to provide a home for the Tai Dam families and preserve their culture, it was Iowa’s governor who answered.

Iowa always has been home to a blend of immigrants: French, Norwegians, Swedes, Dutch, Germans, Irish, English, Scots, the Sac and Fox who returned to Iowa, Italians, Czech and Croatians, Mexicans, African Americans, Tai Dam, Vietnamese, Laotians, and more. These are Iowa’s people.

People don’t come to Iowa or stay in Iowa because we have mountains (with apologies to our Loess Hills region) or seaside resorts (not even in Sabula, Iowa’s only island city). People come to Iowa for agriculture, for family, for community, for a better quality of life. Iowa is for people who want to make a difference. In ISU Extension and Outreach we amplify this legacy with our focus on signature issues: feeding people, keeping them healthy, helping communities prosper and thrive, and turning the world over to the next generation better than we found it.  Our work isn’t just about creating access to education. Our work is about people – forward-thinking people. We have an obligation to the forward-thinking people who came before us, and those who will follow us, to focus on what matters most. It’s all about people. See you there.

— Cathann

P.S. You can follow me on Twitter @cathannkress.

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