Featured Recipe: Jicama and Black Bean Dip

If you are looking for a great tasting, very healthy dip that can also be served as a salad, check out our Jicama and Black Bean Dip. This recipe is very easy to transport and keeps for several days in the refrigerator. Baked tortilla chips taste great with it.

One of the ingredients of this recipe might be a new one to your family. Jicama [HEE-kah-mah] is often referred to as the Mexican potato. Jicama is a large tuberous root. It has a thin brown skin that should be removed with a peeler or knife. The flesh is white, crisp, juicy and slightly sweet. Because the tuber requires a very long and warm growing season, most of the jicama available in the United States is imported from Mexico and South America. Jicama may be eaten raw in salads or as part of a vegetable platter; cooked, it works well in stir-frying, soups or stews.

Jicama and Black Bean Dip

Ingredients

  • 1 small jicama, peeled and chopped (about 1/2 cup)*
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup frozen corn, thawed
  • 1/2 medium green or red bell pepper, seeded and chopped (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/2 medium onion, diced (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/3 cup light Itailan dressing
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or 1 teaspoon dried cilantro
    *Jicama – Somthing new to try! This dip tastes fine without jicama, but it adds a nice crunch. This also can be served as a salad.

Instructions

  1. In large bowl, combine jicama, beans, corn, pepper, onion, and dressing. If desired, add cilantro.
  2. Stir to coat all vegetables with dressing. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate several hours for flavors to blend.

A half cup of Jicama has only 25 calories, but supplies 22% of your need for Vitamin C and 3 grams of fiber.

9 thoughts on “Featured Recipe: Jicama and Black Bean Dip

  1. Looks amazing! Can’t wait to try that out. Ever since my Youth Group went down to Mexico, I have fallen in love with the jicama.

  2. Find jicama year-round in the produce section of many supermarkets and Latin American markets. Select firm, dry jicama roots. Skin should not appear shriveled, bruised, or blemished.

  3. I feel that is among the most important info for me. And i’m satisfied reading your article. However wanna commentary on some common things, The site taste is great, the articles is in point of fact nice :D. Just right job, cheers.

  4. This is long overdue, but I wanted to thank you for this fantastic recipe! I prepare this for all my cardiac rehabilitation classes as a simple way to incorporate more fiber into individuals daily diets. Many of my patients have later told me they prepared this dish at home or for a get-together and received rave reviews. Thanks for this and all you do.

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