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Christine Hradek, MPH

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek is a State Nutrition Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. She coordinates ISU’s programs which help families with low income make healthy choices with limited food budgets. Christine loves helping families learn to prepare healthy foods, have fun in the kitchen and save money. In her spare time, Christine enjoys cooking, entertaining and cheering on her favorite college football teams with her family and friends.

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Let ‘em eat cake!!

Today’s post is from guest blogger, Holly Van Heel, a Human Sciences Specialist in Nutrition and Wellness at Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.

Tpumpkin apple cakehere is nothing better than a homemade cake with frosting and sometimes you get hungry for one. But I’m never enthused about gathering all the ingredients out of the cupboard, measuring, and dirtying a bunch of dishes.

Someone in my office suggested I try the Spend Smart. Eat Smart. Pumpkin Apple Cake recipe they use. I liked it right away as it uses a cake mix and just 4 other ingredients. Only two of the ingredients need to be measured!  I quickly mixed it up (cake mix, 3 eggs, 1 can pumpkin, apple juice and a little cinnamon), baked it in a bundt pan, took it to work, and shared it with my colleagues. They were surprised to learn the deliciously moist cake they were raving about had no oil or other fat added and was providing 60% of their vitamin A needs. As a bonus, when this cake bakes and cools, it makes its own light, sweet glaze.

It just supports my theory; there is nothing better than a homemade cake with frosting (or light glaze) to satisfy one’s dessert craving.

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover is a Registered Dietitian and mom who loves to cook for her family.

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Chocolate Chip Zucchini Muffins

Do you remember last week when I suggested you grate up a zucchini? This is why – our September recipe of the month is Chocolate Chip Zucchini Muffins and they are delicious! If you have not yet seen our video on preparing zucchini, check it out for some quick hints on grating a zucchini. You do not even need to peel it first!

I like to make these muffins for my children to eat before heading off to school in the morning and here is why:

  • They are made with whole wheat flour, so the fiber will keep their tummies full and the carbohydrates will give their bodies and brains the energy they need to get going in the morning.
  • They are made with both fruits (banana and applesauce) and a vegetable (zucchini). Split between 12 muffins, it may not be a lot of fruits and vegetables, but at least we are getting the day off to a better start than if we had eaten no fruits and vegetables at all.
  • They freeze well. This means I can make a double batch of muffins when I have the time and then freeze the rest for a day when I do not have much time to prepare breakfast.  Store these muffins in freezer bags for up to three months. Thaw by wrapping a muffin in a damp paper towel and re-heating in the microwave on the defrost setting until heated through.

My children like me to make these muffins because, of course, chocolate chips! There is only ¼ cup chocolate chips in the entire recipe, but it is enough to get my children excited about these muffins.

Enjoy!

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover is a Registered Dietitian and mom who loves to cook for her family.

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Top your Toast

Sandwiches with peanut butter and fruits isolated on white background.

It’s September and that means back to school. It can be hard to come up with new healthy options but we have some ideas for you! Whole wheat toast is hearty and healthy and it can be turned into a filling snack or breakfast with some fun toppings. Remember whole grain products pack a nutrient punch and keep you feeling fuller longer, check your label for 100% whole wheat or 100% whole grain.

Play around with our system below to make tasty toasts part of a fun back to school routine.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

Toast a piece of 100%
whole wheat bread

Add a spread

  • Peanut butter
  • Mashed avocado
  • Hummus
  • Cream cheese

Add a fruit or veggie

  • Sliced apple
  • Strawberries
  • Banana
  • Raspberries
  • Sliced tomato
  • Sliced cucumber
  • Sliced bell pepper

Make it your own!

  • Cinnamon
  • Chopped nuts
  • Hot sauce
  • Herbs
  • Cooked egg
  • Seeds

Dive in

Yum!

Here are some of our favorite toast combos.

  • Peanut butter, sliced strawberries and chopped peanuts
  • Mashed avocado, cooked egg, dash of hot sauce
  • Cream cheese, sliced cucumber and sliced tomato
  • Hummus, sliced bell pepper and a bit of cilantro

Happy Snacking!
Kelly Verburgt and Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek is a State Nutrition Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. She coordinates ISU’s programs which help families with low income make healthy choices with limited food budgets. Christine loves helping families learn to prepare healthy foods, have fun in the kitchen and save money. In her spare time, Christine enjoys cooking, entertaining and cheering on her favorite college football teams with her family and friends.

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Preparing a Zucchini

This time of year gardeners tend to have an abundance of zucchini. The challenge is to use it before it goes bad. In our newest video, we show how to prepare a zucchini. The different ways of cutting a zucchini are useful for different recipes. Watch the video today and find out how to slice rounds, cut matchsticks, cube, dice, and grate zucchini.

If you have the time and a zucchini, grate one up this weekend so you have it ready to make our September recipe of the month next week.

Enjoy!

 

 

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover is a Registered Dietitian and mom who loves to cook for her family.

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Salad…it’s not just a side dish

Chicken Club Salad The topic for the blog today is about having salads for a meal when it is hot. When we planned our blog topics a few weeks ago, we were anticipating we would be experiencing hot weather here in Iowa and across much of the US at this time. However, I have to smile because we are currently experiencing below average temperatures here in the Midwest, in the upper 70’ s and lower 80’s. It’s beautiful! It’s still a great time to enjoy a salad as a meal with all the great produce that is in season and be able to spend more time outdoors.

To make a salad a meal, I would recommend including a source of protein, such as some meat, poultry, beans, or eggs. The protein makes the salad more filling. A couple of weeks ago Justine shared the recipe for our Chicken BLT Salads. Some other salads that would be great as a meal are Whole Meal Salad, Chicken Club Salad, or Confetti Rice and Bean Salad. Pair the salads with a whole grain roll or some fruit and a cup of milk for a balanced meal.

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood is a Registered Dietitian who enjoys spending time in the kitchen baking and preparing meals for her family. She does lots of meal planning to stay organized and feed her family nutritious meals.

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Summer Bounty Salad

We have a new video for you! It is Summer Bounty Salad – a recipe that is easy, delicious, and perfect for this time of year. I do not want to spoil the video for you, so I am not going to tell you how to make this recipe. However, I suggest you go find your favorite summer vegetables and your favorite salad dressing because you are going to want them for this recipe.

Enjoy!

 

 

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover is a Registered Dietitian and mom who loves to cook for her family.

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Chicken BLT Salads

Chicken BLT Salads Meal My parents are professional tomato growers. They started out small when I was young with about six plants. Now they have dozens of plants of many different varieties. Regardless of how many tomato plants they have, one thing remains the same – bacon, lettuce, and tomato (BLT) sandwiches. We feast on them along with any other fresh produce we can find (usually corn on the cob, green beans, and cucumbers).

Our recipe of the month for August is a spin on the traditional BLT sandwich – Chicken BLT Salads. Top fresh greens with cooked chicken and bacon and diced tomatoes. Then drizzle with your favorite salad dressing. I would even go a step further and add any other fresh produce you have. I think this salad would be great with carrots, corn cut from the cob, cucumbers, green beans, and onions. Give these salads a try while all this amazing produce is in season.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover

Justine Hoover is a Registered Dietitian and mom who loves to cook for her family.

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The Real Cost of Condiments

By Kelly Verburgt, Nutrition Program Student Assistantyellow mustard, ketchup, barbecue sauce, mayo

From burgers at barbecues to hot dogs at baseball games, condiments are a summer necessity. With so many to choose from and different sized bottles, which will give you the most bang for your buck? Check out some of the most popular options below and see which condiments you should choose this summer.

Ketchup

Ketchup is a classic that is useful for more than just hot dogs and burgers. From meatloaf to “yum yum” sauce at hibachi restaurants, ketchup can be quite versatile and used in many recipes. At only $0.09 per ounce and $2.99 for a big 32-ounce bottle, ketchup is certainly low cost.

Mustard

Whether you love it or hate it, we have all tried this tangy yellow sauce. At only $1.99 for a 14-ounce bottle, and $0.14 per ounce, this is a cheap addition to any barbecue. Like ketchup, mustard can be spiced up and turned into all sorts of things like dressings or sauces. Try using it in the Spend Smart. Eat Smart. Deviled Eggs recipe!

Hot sauce

For those of you who like to add a kick to your food, hot sauce is probably your go-to. Per ounce, hot sauce is the most expensive condiment at $0.22 per ounce, and $1.29 for a 6-ounce bottle. If you only use it now and then, hot sauce can be a great condiment to have on hand. However, if you put it on everything, it can get expensive. Try cooking with red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper, they add spice for less money!

BBQ sauce

This condiment is sweet and delicious and can be the perfect dip for just about any type of meat. Ringing in at $2.69 for an 18-ounce bottle, this sauce is only $0.15 per ounce. It can be high in calories, so use it in moderation. It is delicious on our Shredded Pork Sandwich or Chicken Tenders.

Ranch

Ranch salad dressing is a favorite among children, what they dip in it seems limitless! At $2.99 for a 16-ounce bottle, ranch comes in at $0.19 per ounce. It is one of the more expensive condiments, but if it gets you and your family to eat vegetables, it is totally worth it. Try setting out a vegetable platter with ranch at your next barbecue and watch it disappear. Ranch salad dressing can be quite high in fat and calories so model appropriate portion sizes (1-2 tablespoons). Remember, there are reduced fat versions available.

Condiment Total Cost Ounces Cost/Ounce
Ketchup $2.99 32 $0.09
Mustard $1.99 14 $0.14
Hot Sauce $1.29 6 $0.22
BBQ $2.69 18 $0.15
Ranch $2.99 16 $0.19

Now that you are an expert on condiments, you can make an informed decision at the grocery store on what fits your family best. Wishing you tasty and fun barbeques this summer!

 

 

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood is a Registered Dietitian who enjoys spending time in the kitchen baking and preparing meals for her family. She does lots of meal planning to stay organized and feed her family nutritious meals.

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Condiments—are they good for you?

ketchup, mustard, bbq sauce

By Sarah Allen, Nutrition Program Student Assistant

One of the joys of summer is grilling. One thing that we may not think about is the nutrition of the condiments that we use for grilled foods. I looked at five condiments from my local grocery store and compared them. Take a look at what I found:

Tomato Ketchup Yellow Mustard Ranch Dressing Hot Sauce Barbecue Sauce
Serving 1 Tbsp. 1 tsp. 2 Tbsp. 1 tsp. 2 Tbsp.
Calories 20 0 140 0 35
Total Fat, g 0g 0g 14g 0g 0g
Sodium, mg 160mg 60mg 260mg 200mg 210mg
Carbohydrates (sugar), g 5g (4g) 0g (0g) 2g (1g) 0g (0g) 8g (7g)
Protein, g 0g 0g 0g 0g 0g
Vitamin A % DV** 2% 0% 0% 2% 4%
Vitamin C % DV** 2% 0% 2% 4% 0%
Calcium % DV** 0% 0% 0% N/A* 0%
Iron % DV** 0% 0% 0% N/A* 0%

*N/A: not mentioned on the nutrition label
**DV: Daily Value – calculated based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your needs may vary.

Most of these condiments are tasty, but it is important to keep in mind that they are:

  • High in sodium—this can cause high blood pressure
  • Have little to no protein
  • Have little to no vitamins and minerals
  • Have empty calories—this means calories that do not provide much nutrition

The serving size in the chart is what is listed on the label. If more than that is used, that would mean the sodium would be even higher. In general, we should eat less than 2,300 mg of sodium per day. If you or your kids are like me when I was a kid, you may dunk everything in ketchup, ranch dressing, or barbecue sauce.

Consider using a small amount of these condiments and adding vegetables to your favorite foods to add more flavor (and color)! For example, add leafy lettuce, tomato and onion to your hamburger or chicken sandwich. Be sure to look for next week’s blog post about the cost of these condiments and some healthier ways to use them!

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood is a Registered Dietitian who enjoys spending time in the kitchen baking and preparing meals for her family. She does lots of meal planning to stay organized and feed her family nutritious meals.

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