Fast Food Restaurant vs Homemade Breakfast

Written by Kathryn Standing

Student Assistant, ISU Dietetics

It can be difficult to keep to a budget, keep yourself healthy and keep to your schedule. I have been trying to change my breakfast routine with the goal of reducing my stress and spending, all while being healthier. Easy right? If I pick up breakfast on the way to work from a drive-through, would it save me time and money? How healthy would it be? I tried a couple of fast food breakfasts near my home to see what I find and I’m sharing the low down with you.

Drive through breakfast

Sandwich

Time: 10 min — The fast food restaurant is about 6 min out of my way and the time through the drive-through was 4 min for a total of 10 min invested in my breakfast.

Cost: $ 2.59

Calories: 340

Fat: 15 g

Saturated fat: 5 g

Cholesterol: 175 mg

Sodium: 640 mg

Fiber: 1g

→ Comments: The sandwich was pretty good! I got crumbs all over my car, though. Plus, I couldn’t resist getting some breakfast potatoes, which I regretted later. If I had chosen this sandwich on a croissant instead it would have doubled my fat and added 160 calories!

Parfait

Time: 12 min — The fast food restaurant is about 5 min out of my way and was very busy! The time through the drive-through was 7 min for a total of 12 min invested in my breakfast.

Cost: $ 4.19

Calories: 240                                   

Fiber: 3g

Fat: 2.5 g                                          

Sugar: 26 g, Added 18.95g

Cholesterol: 5 mg

Sodium: 125 mg

→ Comments: It was a good parfait, very sweet! It was also in a handy container. The fast-food restaurant I went to was very busy. I managed to get the last parfait, but I worry they would be out if I wanted to get one again.

At home breakfast

Sandwich

1 whole wheat English muffin – 1 egg – 1 slice reduced fat white American singles

Time: 7 min — It took me about 4 min to cook the egg and toast the bread, plus another 3 min for clean-up.

Cost: $ .56

Calories: 245

Fat: 8.5 g

Saturated fat: 3 g

Cholesterol: 196 mg

Sodium: 530 mg

Fiber: 3g

→ Comments: This sandwich was very similar to the one I had gotten at the drive-thru, except I used the whole wheat version of an English muffin. The sandwich I made at home had better nutrition for me with almost half the fat and triple the fiber. Though the cholesterol was higher, I assume that is only because of a difference in the type and size of eggs used. The sodium was a little lower in mine, but this experiment does show that sodium is hard to limit sometimes.

Parfait

½ cup plain non-fat yogurt sweetened with 1 tsp honey – ½ cup berries (frozen, thawed) – 2 T granola

Time: 5 min — It took me about 3 min to make, plus another 2 min to clean up.

Cost: $1.16

Calories: 150

Fat: 2 g

Cholesterol: 5 mg

Sodium: 80 mg

Fiber: 6.9g

Sugar: 19.2 g,

Added sugars 6g

→ Comments: This was so easy to make. It has significantly less sugar and sodium, as well as more than double the fiber!

Verdict: Overall it was significantly cheaper to make the food at home. I saved $2.00+ on the sandwich and $3.00+ on the parfait, that’s over $5.00! $5.00+ per workday is equivalent to savings of over $100 per month! Both of my homemade items were a lot healthier for me too. The food from the fast food places was convenient, though I had to clean the crumbs out of my car later and it didn’t end up saving me any time. The largest downside for me was the temptation of all the other options available. Fried potatoes, whip cream coffee mocha-whatever-latte, and icing covered anything calling my name make it hard to stick to healthy eating. Overall the answer seems clear: skip the fast food breakfast and take the 5-7 min to make yourself something at home. Your wallet, your health, and your schedule will thank you.

A Week in Someone Else’s Shoes

002Last week I wrote about my experience with the SNAP Challenge. I limited my food budget to what I would receive if I participated in SNAP (formerly known as food stamps). I learned a lot and put my cooking and shopping skills to the test! Dr. Ruth Litchfield is a friend and colleague of mine who is a dietitian and teaches nutrition courses at our university. She took the SNAP challenge as well. I was fascinated to learn about her family’s experience.

Ruth is married with two children. Her daughter is away at school and her son is at home, so her budget for the week was for three ($84). Ruth teaches college courses about nutrition including food assistance programs but has never “lived it” herself. This gave her the opportunity to practice some of what she teaches.

Given Ruth’s extensive knowledge and background in nutrition, she was able to approach the week with a lot of strategy and planning. Ruth also had the advantage of being an experienced cook. So with all of this knowledge you might wonder what she chose to buy.

Breakfast

Ruth described breakfast as a challenge, “We are accustomed to more convenience items for breakfast including cereal and instant oatmeal.” Those foods didn’t fit in the overall budget so they stuck with toast, canister oatmeal, and pancakes.

Lunch

Typically Ruth packs sack lunches for everyone in her house. If her family actually qualified for SNAP, her son would receive free lunch at school. As part of this experience, he ate school lunch for the week. He enjoyed the lunch provided at school, but the weather threw the whole family a curve ball. Winter weather meant one day of no school, two early dismissals and one late start. Ruth described how this unexpected change created some problems with her plan. “That meant two additional noon meals at home that I had not planned on, if I had been really depending on the school meals that would have been a big issue,” she said.

Dinner

Chicken hindquarters were on sale at Ruth’s grocery store, so she purchased a large bag and built several meals around using this chicken. She chose meals that would stretch the meat as much as possible like chicken noodle soup and wild rice soup with chicken. In addition, she planned some meatless meals like egg casserole and pasta with tomato sauce.

Ruth’s experience was similar to mine in that she had to fall back on her cooking and meal-planning skills in order to make the budget work and feed her family nutritious meals. They also had to make a few changes to their usual habits.

  • She reduced their usual variety of fruits and vegetables. They ate a mix of fresh, frozen, and canned fruits and veggies throughout the week based on what was available at a good price.
  • She avoided convenience foods and replaced them with less-expensive options.
  • She built meals around items that were on sale and stretched more expensive items like meat as much as possible.
  • Her son ate school lunch instead of his usual sack lunch.

Though Ruth’s family had enough food to get through the week without going hungry, Ruth shared that she was preoccupied with thoughts about food during the week. “I was thinking about food much more that week than I typically would, it was surprising how much food occupied my thoughts.”

We would love to hear your cost-saving strategies in the comments section below. Do you have some go-to-meals that help you save money while still eating healthy?

Be sure to check next week’s blog for another SNAP challenge story. We’ll hear how Vickie and Paul Rhoads as well as their teenage son Wyatt took on the challenge.

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Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek is a State Nutrition Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. She coordinates ISU’s programs which help families with low income make healthy choices with limited food budgets. Christine loves helping families learn to prepare healthy foods, have fun in the kitchen and save money. In her spare time, Christine enjoys cooking, entertaining and cheering on her favorite college football teams with her family and friends.

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Do it Yourself Meal Kits for Kids

Better Nutrition, Lower Cost, and Less Waste

The commercials for ready-to-go meal kits for kids, make them look like fun and excitement in a box. The reality is a little different. There is no arguing with the fact that these meal kits are convenient, but are you really getting a good value for your money?

Take a look inside the box, not so appetizing. Let’s take a look at what I got for my money.

NEWnutrition facts and ingredients

Ingredients – We’ve all heard that if you can’t pronounce the ingredients, you probably shouldn’t eat it. Take a look at this ingredient list.

Nutrition – Meal kits typically contain far more sodium, saturated fat, and sugar than kids need in a meal. Most include no fruits or vegetables at all. Take a look at this nutrition facts label from a store bought meal kit. The calories, fat, saturated fat, and sodium are quite high.

Waste – Imagine the amount of garbage these packages generate in a school cafeteria!

Cost – The average price for meal kits at my store was $2.79. This is actually more expensive than school lunch at most schools and far less nutritious.

sodium chart larger

I decided to challenge myself to come up with some healthy DIY versions of these meal kits that would be easy to prepare and just as fun for kids.

I started with some reusable containers that had dividers like the meal kits’ disposable boxes and an ice pack to keep the food cold. I also set some rules for myself:

  • Create boxes that follow MyPlate guidelines.
  • Use only items that can be packed on Sunday and keep fine until Friday. I’m only packing lunches once!
  • Use only items that require minimal preparation like cutting or chopping.

DIY lunchable

Check out the list below for some foods from each food group that work with my rules.

chart green
My meal kit has much more color, nutrition and appeal than the store bought one and I bought the ingredients for 10 kits like this (assuming two kids with five lunches each) for less than $20.00. That’s less than $2.00 per kit. Assuming kids will purchase milk at school to go with their DIY meal kits; the price is just below the price of the store bought ones.

The National School Lunch Program at your child’s school provides convenient, nutritious meals for a great value, but these ready-to-go DIY meal kits are a good option for kids who prefer to bring their lunch.

 s Signature-1

 

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek

Christine Hradek is a State Nutrition Specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. She coordinates ISU’s programs which help families with low income make healthy choices with limited food budgets. Christine loves helping families learn to prepare healthy foods, have fun in the kitchen and save money. In her spare time, Christine enjoys cooking, entertaining and cheering on her favorite college football teams with her family and friends.

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Vegetable Oils – Comparison, Cost, and Nutrition

As I was reaching for the canola oil in my cupboard last week while doing some baking, I got to looking at the different oils I have on hand. The canola oil and olive oil are at the front of the cupboard because those are the ones I use most often but I also have peanut oil and sesame oil. Some may wonder, like my husband, why I have four different kinds of oil. The kind of oil I use depends on what kind of food I’m preparing. For baking, I like to use canola oil but for roasting or sautéing vegetables, I use olive oil.

When deciding what kind of oil you are going to buy, consider three things 1) what it will be used for, 2) how much it costs, and 3) nutrition. Below is a comparison of commonly used oils. You’ll notice olive oil is more expensive than canola or vegetable oil, but keep in mind that typically recipes call for small amounts of olive oil so a bottle lasts a long time.

Type of Oil Uses Cost*** Unit price
(per fl oz)
Canola
(48 fluid oz)
Sautéing, baking, frying, marinating 3.59-4.59 .07-.09
Olive
(17 fl oz)
Grilling, sautéing, roasting, spreads for breads 7.69-7.99 .45-.47
Vegetable*
(48 fl oz)
Sautéing, baking, frying, marinating 3.18-4.39 .06-.09
Peanut
(24 fl oz)
Stir-frying, roasting, deep frying, baking 3.58-4.98 .15-.21
Sesame**
(8.45 fl oz)
(12.7 fl oz)
Stir-frying (light), dressings/sauces (dark) 5.89-7.89 .70-.62

*usually made from a combination of corn, soybeans, and/or sunflower seeds

**there are light and dark versions of sesame oil

***Costs were found at grocery stores in Central Iowa

Below is a chart that compares the nutritional value of different fats and oils. Saturated and trans fats raise cholesterol levels and are not heart-healthy. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated are considered the ‘good’ fats. Oils high in monounsaturated fats are particularly heart healthy because they lower LDL levels, the ‘bad’ kind of cholesterol. Replacing the fats and oils that are higher in saturated and trans fats with those higher in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats is good for your health.

oil comparison chart

I also noticed while in the grocery store a couple of new oil blends. There is a Natural Blend oil that is a combination of canola, sunflower, and soybean oil. It was $3.59 for a 48 fluid ounce bottle. The other new one I noticed was called Omega and was a combination of canola and extra virgin olive oil. It was $3.99 for a 48 fluid ounce bottle.

For best quality store your oil in a cool, dark place and replace it if it smells “bitter” or “off.”

Watch our recent ‘How To’ video and learn how to make your own salad dressing using the oils in your cupboard.

Jodi Signature

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood is a Registered Dietitian who enjoys spending time in the kitchen baking and preparing meals for her family. She does lots of meal planning to stay organized and feed her family nutritious meals.

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Save on your 4th of July Picnic

Liz Veggie tray

Whether it is a Superbowl party, a bridal shower, 4th of July, or Christmas, vegetable trays are always on the table. Recently my grandparents celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary and their party was  no different; a vegetable tray was on the menu. My original instinct was to go with the convenience of a pre-made vegetable tray because I thought it would be comparable in price. Then Spend Smart asked me to compare the prices and time between homemade and purchased veggie trays. BOY WAS I SURPRISED! Preparing my own tray compared to buying the already assembled tray cost a third the cost of the assembled tray. For that savings I am willing to spend the 23 minutes it took me to prepare the vegetables.

Through this exercise, I learned some things I am going to use for the relish tray I am preparing for my 4th of July picnic. I am going to check out prices of vegetables at other stores to see if I can get a better price. If I have time I will check out a farmers market.

  • I am going to substitute green or red peppers for the celery. I like them better, the cost is about the same and the time to prepare them is less than the celery…that way I only have the broccoli to cut up.  I might also substitute olives or pickles for one of the other vegetables.
  • If all the vegetables I buy do not fit on my tray, I will just bag them up to use as snacks (they are already washed, chopped and ready to eat), or used them later in the week as a side such as a broccoli cauliflower salad.
  • If there are kids that want to help, this would be a good way to get them involved with a party.

A little planning in advance can save you a bunch of money when it comes to vegetables trays. (I wonder how much money is to be saved with fruit trays?)

Here is how I figured the cost:

1) First, went to the produce department and talked with an extremely helpful young woman about their prices for already made trays and the weight of each of the vegetables on the tray

2) I purchased each of the vegetables that were on the pre-made vegetables tray.

3) Twenty-three minutes later I finished washing, chopping, and weighing the vegetables.

veggie-tray-NEW
Food safety is extremely important, especially when you are feeding others. Here’s one of our new video that shows how easy it is to wash vegetables.

Liz Breuer

How Much are you Paying for your Coffee?

PR27358-1526x228983% of Americans drink coffee according to the National Coffee Association’s 2013 online survey. That’s up from 78% last year and more than any other country in the world.

How much do we pay for coffee?  That is really hard to figure since:

1)  We drink different size cups and make it different strengths. It used to be a cup of coffee was 6oz. Now a cup of coffee is at least 8 ounces with mugs and to-go cups routinely being 12-18 ounces.

2)  There are many ways to make your coffee. Home-brewing gadgets and single-serve coffee makers are very popular, as are gourmet beans and coffeehouses.

3)  Coffee drink sales are increasing while drinking traditional coffee is dropping. Last year nearly 1/3 of US adults were drinking a gourmet coffee each day. This includes coffees such as lattes and espresso along with custom blends of exotic beans.

Liz Breuer, an ISU dietetics student, and I decided to compare prices. Check out the coffee prices we found in central Iowa.

Ounces per container  Cost Cost for 12 ounces One Coffee a day for a year
Brewed Coffee*
Cameron’s ground flavor coffee 12  $ 6.99  $ 0.41  $ 150.08
Cameron’s bulk coffee 12  $ 6.74  $ 0.40  $ 144.71
HyVee Whole Bean Coffee 12  $ 6.69  $ 0.39  $ 143.64
Starbucks ground coffee 12  $ 8.99  $ 0.53  $ 193.02
Dunkin Donuts Coffee 12  $ 7.38  $ 0.43  $ 158.45
Panera ground Coffee 12  $ 8.29  $ 0.49  $ 177.99
Folgers coffee flavored 11.5  $ 5.39  $ 0.32  $ 115.73
Folgers coffee plain (on sale) 33.9  $ 7.88  $ 0.17  $ 61.20
Single Serve
Cameron’s single serve 12 cups $7.49 12 K cups  $ 7.49  $ 0.62  $ 227.82
8 O’clock (Keurig) 12 K cup packs $6.99 12 K cups  $ 6.99  $ 0.58  $ 212.61
Green Mountain (Keurig) 12 K cup packs $8.29 12 K cups  $ 8.29  $ 0.61  $ 222.85
35 K cup assortment mail order including shipping 35 K cups  $ 27.99  $ 0.79  $ 288.35
Coffee by the Cup
Starbucks 12 oz. with one pump hazelnut 12  $ 1.77  $ 1.77 $ 646.05
  with three pumps hazelnut 12  $ 2.30  $ 2.30  $ 839.50
Casey’s gas station 12  $ 1.09  $ 1.09  $ 397.85
Panera^ 16  $ 1.99  $ 1.49  $ 543.85
Butterfinger Frappuccino^ 16  $ 4.35  $ 3.26  $ 1,189.90
* Costs calculated estimating 12 oz. of coffee would yield 17-12 ounces cup^ Costs calculated from 16 oz. price

I’m one of those 83% who drink coffee and I am especially fond of hazelnut flavored coffee. If I really want to splurge I have a skim milk latte. I admit I haven’t tried the other specialty coffees because I just can’t get past the cost and the calories.

According to the Mayo clinic, the health benefits of drinking coffee in moderate amounts outweighs the risks. However, added fat and sugar in some drinks can make them unhealthy. The Daily Beast, which is part of Newsweek, has an article called 40 Unhealthiest Coffees  which I thought was very interesting.

If you want to know more about brewing and storing coffee, roasting types, or recipes check out the National Coffee Association’s web site.

Peggy Signature

Should I Follow a Gluten Free Diet?

As a dietetic intern, I get frequent questions about gluten free diets. Most of these questions have been prompted by articles on Facebook, websites and celebrity’s books. I can’t believe all the claims being made for gluten free diets such as, gluten free diets help with weight loss, increase energy and concentration, improve autism and rheumatoid arthritis, and in general are supposed to be healthier.

What is gluten? Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, and some oats. Food we consume everyday like cookies, cakes, pizza, pasta, cereals and breads have gluten in them.

Approximately 1% of the population has a medical condition called celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine lining and  prevents absorption of nutrients from foods that are consumed. The damage is due to a reaction of eating gluten.

Most of us will not benefit from a gluten free diet. There is no current evidence that eating a gluten free diet will help with weight loss or is a healthier diet in general. In addition, not consuming these food products means you may be lacking essential nutrients like iron, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, folate and  fiber in your diet.

Interestingly, research has shown that gluten free products are higher in fat. Looking at the nutrition of a regular vs. a gluten free food product; 1 slice of regular multigrain bread has 120 calories, 1 gram of total fat and has 12% of your daily fiber intake and 15% of your daily intake of iron (based on 2,000 calorie diet). Gluten free multigrain bread has 80 calories, 3.5 grams of total fat, 4 % of your daily fiber intake and 2 % of your daily iron intake.

The cost of eating gluten free products is significantly higher. Gluten free products cost 242% more than regular products and lack variety. The graph below shows the food cost comparison of regular items vs. gluten free items.

Gluten Chart

So before you consider switching to a gluten free diet, consider saving money and eating non- gluten free foods that provide you with excellent nutrition and health benefits. Also, if you have symptoms of celiac disease (gas, bloating, diarrhea, weight loss/gain, fatigue) contact your healthcare provider to set up an appointment for appropriate screening.

The Mythbusters poster was created by an ISU nutrition class. Let’s bust the myths!

Print

True or False? 

Gluten free diet is a healthier diet for everyone.

Gluten free products have fewer calories.

Gluten containing grains contribute to more than 75% of typical daily grain consumption.

Celiac disease is a food allergy.

Celiac disease is easy to diagnosis.

Gluten free diet can compromise gut immunity.

Check back for the answers Tuesday, June 18, 2013 on our facebook page!  https://www.facebook.com/spendsmarteatsmart
Abbie Brekken, ISU Dietetic Intern
Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood

Jody Gatewood is a Registered Dietitian who enjoys spending time in the kitchen baking and preparing meals for her family. She does lots of meal planning to stay organized and feed her family nutritious meals.

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What is Cheaper: Turkey or Ham?

Thanksgiving is about 10 days away. Have you started to plan your dinner? The biggest expense of the meal will probably be the ham or turkey (or both) that you buy. The grocery ads are full of deals, like buy a ham and get a turkey free. Or buy $50 in groceries and get a $5 off coupon for your turkey. I was curious, so I stopped by 5 different stores to check out prices. I went to Hy-Vee, Fareway, Aldi, Dahls, and Wal-Mart.

Here are the costs I found. Whole turkey prices range from $.88 to $1.19 a pound. Boneless, spiral cut hams are about $3.50 a pound. Bone-in ham varies from $1.48 to 1.98 a pound. Both ham and turkey are priced to lure you to the store.

Number of 3 ounce servings per pound Cost per pound Cost per serving
Turkey 2 $ 0.99 $ 0.50
Ham, boneless 4 $ 3.50 $ 0.88
Ham, bone-in 3.5 $ 1.80 $ 0.51

The simple answer is turkey and the bone-in ham cost about the same with boneless ham costing significantly more. But, as usual, every situation is different. Below are some comments/questions with some of my thoughts.

Doesn’t matter what it costs. I want to serve both ham and turkey and make sure we have enough. Ok, but when you are buying, remember you can cut back on the amount you buy because people will eat some, but not a whole serving of each.

Is the buy a ham, get a free turkey a good deal? That deal was to buy about 7 pounds of boneless ham at $3.50 ($24.50 total) and get a 12 pound turkey free. You would get about 28 3 oz. servings of ham and 24 3 ounce servings of turkey. So you would get 40 servings for $24.50 at .61/serving. If you want a boneless ham it is a good deal. But it would be cheaper to by the bone-in ham and turkey separately.

We are saving for Christmas gifts so I don’t want to spend a lot. I would get either a boneless ham or the turkey. If you have time, go for the turkey and make soup from the turkey bone (that way you can stretch the cost over several meals). A couple of years ago we developed a Healthy Holiday Dinner Menu with Recipes.

I am exhausted after our Thanksgiving meal. Maybe we should just go out to eat. Last year in the blogI shared my Top 5 tips to save time, money, stress and calories for Thanksgiving dinner. Maybe you will find an idea that works for you.

My turkey is always dry so I think I’ll have ham this year. Are you cooking the turkey too long? Try using a meat thermometer (sometimes the pop-up timers fail). Put the thermometer in the thickest part of the thigh because the dark meat of the turkey thigh takes longer to cook than any other part. When the thermometer is at 165 degrees, it is done.

My grandpa says he can’t eat ham so we will have turkey. From a health standpoint both ham and turkey are great sources of protein, but turkey provides significant less fat if you skip the skin. Ham also has more than 10 times the sodium and may contain nitrates.

Have a Great Holiday.

Fruit or Juice –Which is Smarter?

Children and adults need 1.5 – 2 cups of fruit a day.  It is definitely smarter to buy fruit than juice if you are thinking only about nutrition.  Check out my list below of the top 5 reasons why fruit is better. If you are thinking about cost and nutrition, the answer is more complicated.

Top 5 Reasons Why Fruit is Better than Juice for Nutrition

  1. 8 ounces of juice has 100-140 calories while medium size fruit has 70-100 calories.  Calories from liquids do not curb your appetite like calories from solid foods, so by choosing whole fruit you will not compensate by eating more or later in the day also you are more likely to eat something along with juice.
  2. Juices sometimes are fortified with a smattering of vitamins and minerals but fruit has small amounts of many nutrients.
  3. “Light” juices are usually diluted with water and have a calorie free sweetener added (sometimes with added vitamins).  You could stretch your juice at home by mixing it with water.
  4. Processing and removal of the skin and peel result in less antioxidants.
  5. Whole fruit provides more fiber.

Considering Cost…

First, make sure you are comparing “apples to apples” by looking only at containers labeled 100% juice.  Drinks, punches, “ades” or low-percent fruit juice products are so low in nutrients that they do not count.

In central Iowa at the end of August, concentrated fruit juice is hard to beat if you are on a tight budget.  It’s only about $0.25 a cup.  That being said, the benefits of fruit are clear so I would try to buy fruit that is in season (and cheaper) and make sure to eat it before it spoils.

Check out my cost comparison between fruit and juice plus a handy chart you can use to compare what a cup of fruit costs without the peels, cores, pits, etc.

-Pointer from Peggy

Test Your Shopping Skills

Being a good grocery shopper is more complicated than just getting the cheapest price on a certain item.  The best shoppers do the following:

  • Plan menus before shopping
  • Use a grocery list
  • Compare unit prices
  • Look for store and generic brands offering comparable quality
  • Buy day-old or reduced-price bread
  • Keep written records of how much they spend for food
  • Avoid unnecessary trips to the store
  • Check dates for freshness to avoid waste
  • Buy sale items
  • If storage is not a problem, buy in quantity and repackage items into smaller portions at home

We have a shopping quiz on the SpendSmart site to test your grocery shopping skills.  If you want to play, make sure you have your audio turned on.  There are 18 different questions on the game board.  Let me know if you agree with the answers and how you did.

~ Pointers from Peggy

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