Mexican Corn Salad

Serving Size: 1/2 cup | Serves: 8

Ingredients:

  • Cooking spray or oil for grill grates
  • 4 medium ears of corn (husks and silks removed) (or 16 oz. frozen whole kernels, thawed)
  • 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallions
  • 1 tablespoon minced jalapeño pepper (seeds removed)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

Instructions:

NOTE: If using frozen corn, skip to third instruction below.

  1. Spray grill grates with nonstick cooking spray or brush them with oil. Heat grill to 400°–450°F.
  2. Place corn on the grill and cook 15–20 minutes, turning every 5 minutes until evenly grilled and kernels are tender. Remove corn from the grill and set aside to rest until cool enough to handle. Using a serrated knife, cut corn kernels off cob and place in a large bowl.
  3. While corn is cooking, whisk together yogurt, garlic, lime juice, and chili powder.
  4. Add scallions, jalapeño pepper, cilantro, and cheese to corn. Toss with yogurt sauce and season with more chili powder if desired.

Nutrient information per serving:
78 calories, 3g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 9mg cholesterol, 119mg sodium, 11g total carbohydrate, 1g dietary fiber, 3g sugar, 4g protein


Adapted from Today’s Dietitian

Putting Mindfulness on Your Plate

Have you ever looked at your plate and been surprised to find your meal gone? If so, you may benefit from eating more mindfully.

What is mindful eating? It is a purposeful awareness of the food we eat and being present during the meal experience. When we employ mindful eating, our busy lives slow down when we eat and we are aware of the flavors, tastes, and textures of the food. Our meal becomes more relaxed and enjoyable.

"Think before you eat" post-it on a plate

Here is an exercise you can do to practice mindful eating:

  1. Take a grape, piece of chocolate, or piece of cheese. Observe the appearance, shape, and texture. Notice the color and indentations.
  2. Smell the food. Notice the aroma.
  3. Take a bite or place a small amount of the food in your mouth, but do not chew it. Describe the texture and flavor before you chew the food.
  4. After 30 seconds, chew the food and describe the texture and flavor.
  5. Do you notice any difference?

Your newfound awareness can put more mindfulness on your plate.

Sources:
Today’s Dietitian; January 2019; The Merits of Mindfulness—How Mindfulness Practice Can Enhance Health and Well-Being
Today’s Dietitian; March 2013; Mindful Eating—Studies Show This Concept Can Help Clients Lose Weight and Better Manage Chronic Disease

Get Your Family Moving!

You probably know that regular physical activity helps both parents and children stay well. It strengthens the heart, muscles, and bones. But did you know that physical activity could strengthen families, too? Families that take walks, play sports, or do physically active chores together often notice these benefits: better communication and bonding, less stress and conflict, and more family fun!

Getting family members of all ages involved in the same physical activity at one time can be a challenge. Here are tips that may help:Sports equipment

  • Set regular, specific activity times. Determine times when the whole family is available.
  • Plan and track progress. Write plans on a family calendar.
  • Build new skills. Enroll yourself and the kids in exercise classes you will both enjoy.
  • Treat physical activity as a gift. Give presents that encourage physical activity, such as bikes, balls, jump ropes, and badminton sets.

Both parents and children can treasure the times when the family is physically active together. Visit Choose MyPlate’s Ten Tips to Be an Active Family for additional information.

Sources: ChooseMyPlate.gov, WebMD

Smartphones in the Kitchen

washing handsA 2016 FDA survey showed 49% of consumers use their smartphones while preparing food. However, only one-third washed their hands with soap after touching the devices! Why is this a big deal? Whenever you touch a phone, the bacteria on that phone travel to your hands. If your unwashed hands then touch food, you transfer those bacteria to the food. This can cause foodborne illness.

Here are three tips to keep your phone from contaminating your food:

  • Clean and sanitize your phone regularly with a lint-free cloth.
  • Avoid taking your phone into the bathroom.
  • Scrub your hands at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water after touching a phone and before handling food.

Sources: FDA, National Institutes of Health, Phys.org

Asparagus with Gremolata Sauce

Serving Size: 1/2 cup | Serves: 6

Asparagus with gremolata sauce is a great side dish to serve with fish. Gremolata is a dressing or a type of garnish that is made with chopped parsley, garlic, and lemon zest.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups fresh asparagus (washed and trimmed)
  • 2 tablespoons butter or margarine
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
  • 1 garlic clove (peeled and minced)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Parsley to taste

Instructions:

  1. Cook asparagus in a large pot of boiling water until tender—about 4 minutes.
  2. Drain. Rinse with cold water to cool quickly and drain again.
  3. Pat dry.
  4. Melt margarine or butter in a large heavy skillet over medium high heat.
  5. Add lemon peel and garlic. Stir for 30 seconds.
  6. Add asparagus and toss to coat.
  7. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Sauté asparagus until heated through—about 3 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Nutrition information per serving:

49 calories, 4g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 3mg sodium, 3g total carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 1g sugar, 2g protein

 

Recipe courtesy of the USDA Mixing Bowl.

Eating Fish Protects Your Heart

salmon and asparagusAccording to the American Heart Association, eating fish twice a week will lower your risk of heart failure, heart attack, and stroke. The best fish for heart health are oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines, or albacore tuna. These fish are all high in omega-3 fatty acids.

So many people have heard about the benefits of omega-3s that fish oil is the most popular nutrition supplement in the United States. However, the latest research shows fish oil isn’t as beneficial as actually eating fish. Whole fish offers a wealth of nutrients besides omega-3 oil, such as protein and selenium. For reasons scientists do not yet fully understand, nutrients often provide the most benefit when they are combined with other nutrients—in the form of food!

Eating fish is both healthy and delicious! Here are a few tips for including fish in your meal plan:

  • Keep seafood on hand. Seafood doesn’t need to be fresh to give you health benefits. Canned and frozen seafood varieties are just as healthy.
  • Be creative. Try different ways to enjoy seafood like seafood salads, tacos, stir-fry, or with pasta.
  • Cook it safely. Make sure you follow safe food handling practices and cook seafood to an internal temperature of 145oF.

ChooseMyPlate.gov offers tips on how to get more heart-healthy seafood on your plate.

Sources:  American Heart Association and Harvard Health

 

Stay Safe in the Summer

Temperature warning signThere are many outdoor summer activities to do in the sun, but it is important for your safety to know the proper precautions to avoid heat-related illnesses. Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are more than 600 heat-related deaths each year. However, there are plenty of things you can do to beat the heat.

 

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing.
  • Protect yourself against sunburn. Wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 and reapply every two hours.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink water. Monitor the color of your urine; it should remain a pale, not dark, yellow.
  • Never leave individuals or animals in parked vehicles.
  • Avoid strenuous activity during the hottest time of the day (early to mid-afternoon). Schedule your exercise during cooler parts of the day such as early morning or evening.

 

Source: Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heat-exhaustion/symptoms-causes/syc-20373250)

Fresh Produce Safety

Bag of lettuceWhen preparing any fresh produce, start with clean hands. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water before and after preparation. Wash all produce thoroughly under running water before preparing and/or eating. This includes produce grown at home, purchased from a grocery store, or bought at a farmers’ market.

Washing fruits and vegetables with soap, detergent, or commercial produce wash is not needed. It is important to wash the surface of the produce, even if you do not plan to eat the skin. Dirt and bacteria can be transferred from the surface when peeling or cutting produce. Scrub firm produce, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush. After washing, dry produce with a clean cloth towel or paper towel to further reduce bacteria that may be present on the surface.

  • Many precut, bagged, or packaged produce items are prewashed and ready to eat. If so, it will be stated on the packaging and you can use the produce without further washing.Spinach label
  • Cut away any damaged, discolored, or bruised areas on fresh fruits and vegetables before preparing and/or eating.
  • Make sure all cutting boards and knives used to cut fresh produce are washed in soapy water and rinsed before using again.

 

Source: Food Safety.gov

Summer Bounty Salad

Summer Bounty Salad

Serving Size: 1 cup | Serves: 8

Ingredients:

  • 7 cups vegetables (zucchini, broccoli, carrots, radishes, green onions), chopped
  • 1 pepper (green, red, or yellow) sliced (1 to 1 1/2 cups)
  • 2 tomatoes (red, yellow, or mixed)
  • 2/3 cup light or fat free salad dressing

Instructions:

  1. Wash and prepare the vegetables. (Cut the carrots, zucchini, radishes, green onions, and pepper in slices. Make the broccoli and cauliflower into florets. Slice or chop tomatoes.)
  2. Combine all vegetables and salad dressing in a bowl, stirring to coat vegetables with dressing.
  3. Cover and refrigerate 1 to 3 hours to blend flavors. Store any leftovers in refrigerator and use within 3 days.

 

Nutrition information per serving:

60 calories, 2.5 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 220 mg sodium, 10 g total carbohydrate, 3 g fiber, 5 g sugar, 2 g protein

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu.

June is Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month

Asparagus, lettuce, radishes, rhubarb, spinach, and strawberries are just a few of the fresh fruits and vegetables available in June! They provide a range of colors to eat and enjoy. It’s important to get a colorful variety of fruits and vegetables into your diet every day.

Colorful fruits and vegetables provide a wide range of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. Phytochemicals are compounds in food that your body uses to maintain good health and energy levels, protect against the effects of aging, and reduce the risk of some types of cancer and heart disease.

Phytochemicals may be considered just as important as protein, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins. Many of the phytochemicals and other compounds that make fruits and vegetables good for us also give them their color. It’s important to eat the rainbow of colors every day to get the full health-promoting benefits of fruits and vegetables.

Fruits and vegetables

When planning meals, try to use colorful fruits and vegetables. Usually the darker the color, the higher the amounts of phytochemicals. When introducing children to a new fruit or vegetable, consider designating a color for each day or week.

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