Setting SMART Physical Activity Goals

With fall approaching, the new schedule for school and work has likely changed your routine. However, that doesn’t mean your exercise routine has to go. To keep yourself accountable, set a SMART goal for fall.

building blocks
  • Specific—This is the “what” of your goal, describing exactly what you’re going to do and where. For example, “I will walk outside more often.”
  • Measurable—How can you measure your goal each day, month, or year? Add specific units and numbers to your goal. “I will walk outside 30 minutes a day.”
  • Attainable—Is this goal attainable for you? Think about your current fitness level and the competing demands on your time.
  • Relevant—Is this goal meaningful and beneficial to you?
  • Time-bound—What is the time frame of your goal? How many days a week, and for how long? For example, “In the month of September, I will walk outside for at least 20 minutes at least three days a week.” At the end of your time frame, you can evaluate your success and make a new SMART goal.

Source: WebMD, www.webmd.com/

Don’t Forget about Lunch-box Food Safety

Lunch bag with drink and fruit

Whether you are back to school or work, packing a meal can have some amazing benefits! Packed meals may be lower in calories and provide more essential nutrients, such as fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Packing meals also saves money. It is important to remember lunch-box food safety when packing your meal. Follow these tips to prevent being ill when eating on the go.

  • Keep cold food below 40°F and hot food above 140°F.
  • Use an insulated lunch box. Some food is safe without a cold source, like whole fruits and vegetables, canned meat and fish, and peanut butter.
  • For perishable foods, keep foods cold by including at least two cold sources. Use two frozen gel packs or combine a frozen gel pack with a frozen juice box, fruit cup, or frozen bottled water. Place cold sources on top and bottom of perishable food items, including lunch meats, eggs, cheese, yogurt, and milk.
  • Clean your lunch box or bag regularly to avoid bacteria growing on the sides.

Source: USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, www.fsis.usda.gov/

After-school Hummus

Serving Size: 2 Tbsp | Serves: 8

Ingredients:

  • 1 can (15 ounces) reduced-sodium garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
  • 2 medium garlic cloves, minced, or 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 Tbsp oil (vegetable or olive)
  • 1/8 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt

Directions:

  1. Use a blender or food processor. Combine garbanzo beans (chickpeas), garlic, lemon juice, cumin, oil, and pepper.
  2. Blend on low speed until beans are mashed.
  3. Stir in yogurt with a spoon.
  4. Place the finished product into an airtight container.
  5. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight, so the flavors blend. Use within 2–3 days.
  6. Serve with whole grain pita chips, crackers, or vegetables such as carrots and celery. Use as a substitute for mayonnaise on a chicken sandwich or a turkey wrap.

Nutrition information per serving:

70 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 80mg sodium, 9g total carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 2g sugar, 3g protein

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu

Back to School? Back to Work? Pack Lunch to Go!

packed lunch with sandwich and fruit

Lunch provides the midday boost that you and your child need for afternoon brainpower. Packing lunch with your child is also a great way to stay connected. What if your child is a choosy eater? This can be a sign your child is searching for more independence. Your child might benefit from packing their own lunch, while you have the opportunity to serve as a model for good nutrition behaviors. Use the five main food groups for you and your child to pack your lunch.

  • Fruit—Apple, banana, peach, grapes, pear, strawberries
  • Vegetable—Raw celery, edamame, cucumber, peppers, carrots, cherry tomatoes
  • Protein—Chicken/turkey breast, tuna, peanut butter, handful of unsalted nuts, hummus, hard-boiled eggs
  • Grain—Whole grain bread, bagel, muffin, steamed brown rice, quinoa
  • Dairy—Cheese stick/cubes, low-fat yogurt, low-fat milk

Encourage your child to pick or add foods together from each category to make a well-balanced lunch!

Source:
“What’s for Lunch? It’s in the Bag,” (store.extension.iastate.edu/product/13900)

Stay Active Without Breaking the Bank

There are several ways to exercise and stay active. Many people think they must spend a lot of money on exercise programs or special equipment. Here are some ways to get active without spending money.

  • Check out the physical activity videos on the Spend Smart Eat Smart website, spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu/video-category/physicalactivity.
  • Walk more. Aim for 30 minutes daily.
  • Play with your kids or pets. Keeping up with their unlimited energy is a good workout.
  • Clean your house, wash the car or mow the lawn.
  • Use free local workouts. Check your community calendar for free or reduced priced classes.
  • Dance! One can burn lots of calories in a short period of time.

Physical activity is vital to overall health. Get active and start feeling better today.

Sources: Health.gov, health.gov

Sleep for Overall Health

Lack of sleep is common, especially these days. Many Americans sacrifice sleep to get all their tasks done on any given day. In fact, 35% of Americans do not meet the recommended hours of sleep.

Adults need 7 to 8 hours of quality sleep each night. Youth need 8 to 12 hours of sleep. Research has shown that sleep is just as important as good nutrition and exercise habits to keep your mind and body healthy.

Getting enough sleep can help lower your risk for heart disease and diabetes, maintain a healthy weight, think more clearly, and perform better in school and at work. Sleep may be related to body weight in youth of all ages. Inadequate sleep may interfere with hormone levels, which stimulate youth to eat more snacks and larger meals. A tired child is also more prone to sit on the couch rather than play outside.

Use these tips to get longer, better sleep.

  • Go to bed at the same time every night. Set and enforce regular bedtimes.
  • Keep phones, laptops and TVs out of the bedroom.
  • Avoid texting, watching TV, playing video games, or using a computer at least 30 minutes before bedtime.
  • Do not eat in bed.
  • Create a calming nighttime routine for yourself and your kids– reading, listening to music, or talking about the day.

Good sleep is critical to your health, so make sure you get a good night’s sleep.

Sources:
CDC, cdc.gov/sleep/data_statistics.html
Health.gov, health.gov
Healthy children, healthychildren.org
Eat right, www.eatright.org

Crisp Fruit Salad

Serving Size: 3/4 cup | Serves: 6

Bowl of fruit salad

Ingredients:

  • 1 red apple
  • 1 pear
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup seedless grapes, halved
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1 container (6 ounces) low fat, sugar free vanilla yogurt
  • 2 Tbsp light mayo or salad dressing

Directions:

  1. Wash fruit.
  2. Chop apple and pear (leave skin on). Add to large serving bowl and toss with lemon juice.
  3. Add grapes and raisins to bowl.
  4. Combine yogurt and mayonnaise in a small bowl; spread over fruit.
  5. Stir to combine. Refrigerate. This is best eaten the day it is prepared.

Nutrition information per serving:

130 calories, 2g total fat, 0.5g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 55 mg sodium, 27g total carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 12g sugar, 2g protein

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu

Keep Cool With Cooler Safety

Hot summer days bring outside meals with family or friends. Before you head to the next picnic, it’s important to know how to pack the cooler to keep food at a safe temperature.

Cooler with ice and beverage cans
  • The day before, clean your cooler(s). If it feels warm, allow it to cool down indoors. Consider filling water bottles or milk cartons to freeze overnight to use as ice blocks in your cooler. Ice blocks stay frozen longer than ice cubes or ice packs.
  • Load food straight from the fridge to your cooler. Perishable foods like raw meat, poultry, and fish should be stored in watertight containers or zipped plastic bags to prevent their juices from dripping onto other foods. The cooler should always be below 40ºF. A thermometer placed in the cooler will help monitor the temperature inside.
  • Avoid opening the lid, which lets cold air out and warm air in. Pack beverages in one cooler and perishable food in a separate cooler. When traveling, place the cooler in the car rather than the hot trunk. Once at your destination, keep your cooler in a shaded area rather than in the hot sun. Placing a blanket, rug or quilt over the cooler will also help keep it cool.

Sources:
Eat right, www.eatright.org
Food Safety and Inspection Service, www.fsis.usda.gov/foodsafety

Making Salad Safely

Salad is a popular summer dish. However, it is also linked with foodborne illness. There are ways to prepare salad safely so that friends and family do not get sick. Salad food safety tips include the following:

  • Wash your hands! Always wash hands before and after preparing any salad ingredient.
  • Don’t rewash lettuce that is already prewashed in the package. This can introduce contaminants that were already eliminated.
  • Use a different knife and cutting board for each ingredient. If you intend to keep salad ingredients separate for people to make their own, you won’t have contaminated all ingredients.
  • Keep salads cold in a refrigerator, in a cooler, or over ice. Don’t leave out at room temperature for more than two hours. Warmer temperatures (40–140 degrees) can cause bacteria to grow on food and promote illness.
  • Make sure salad is served with a utensil and not bare hands. Hands carry viruses and bacteria that can cause illness. It is best to use clean and sanitized salad tongs or forks.
  • Visit Produce Basics (spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu/cook/produce-basics) for tips on how to select, store, and wash many types of salad ingredients.

Refresh Yourself with Water for Summer Exercise

Water bottle

The human body is 60% water. Our cells need water to:

  • Remove waste,
  • Control body temperature,
  • Lubricate and cushion joints, and
  • Protect sensitive tissues.

Water is vital to regulate body temperature during exercise in the summer heat. Lack of water can lead to extreme thirst, fatigue, and dizziness. Dehydration is particularly dangerous for young children and older adults.

How much water do we need to be drinking? Adults should get 9–14 cups of fluid a day. Generally, if your urine is pale or colorless, you are getting enough.

Remember, you can also drink and eat other things besides water to get the fluid you need.

  • 100% juice (no more than 1 cup a day)
  • Milk
  • Fruit
  • Nonstarchy vegetables
  • Tea
  • Coffee
  • Sports drinks (if sweating a lot)

For more about your water needs, visit Mayo Clinic, mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256.

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