Eggs and Poultry: Safe to Eat

brown eggsAvian influenza has been in the news recently as it spreads throughout poultry flocks in Iowa. Avian influenza does not impact the foods eaten by consumers and cannot be contracted from properly cooked and prepared meats by consumers. The disease is caused by an influenza virus that can infect poultry such as chickens, turkeys, domestic ducks, and geese, and it is carried by migratory birds such as ducks, geese, and shorebirds. It’s possible that humans could be infected with the virus only if they were in very close contact with sick birds.

Following safe food handling and cooking practices for poultry foods will keep
you safe.

  • Wash hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw eggs and poultry.
  • Clean cutting boards and other utensils with soap and hot water to keep poultry or eggs from contaminating other foods.
  • Sanitize cutting boards using a solution of one tablespoon of chlorine bleach to one gallon of water.
  • Cook poultry to an internal temperature of at least 165°F. Consumers can cook poultry to a higher temperature for personal preferences.
  • Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm. Casseroles and other dishes should be cooked to 165°F.
  • Use pasteurized eggs or egg products for recipes that are served using raw or undercooked eggs, such as Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream. Commercial mayonnaise, dressing, and sauces containing pasteurized eggs are safe to eat.

The Egg Industry Center at Iowa State University has additional information for consumers at www.ans.iastate.edu/EIC/Templates/AvianInfluenzaConsumers.dwt.

Source: Angela Laury Shaw, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

Make-ahead Breakfast Burritos

breakfast-burritosServing Size: 1 burrito | Serves: 8

Ingredients:
1 cup diced potatoes (1 medium potato)
1/2 cup diced onions (1/2 medium onion)
1 cup diced bell peppers (1 medium pepper)
8 beaten eggs
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 cup shredded 2% reduced-fat cheddar cheese
8 flour tortillas (8 inch)

Instructions:
1. Spray a large skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Cook the potatoes for 6 to 10 minutes over medium heat.
2. Add onions and peppers to the potatoes. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the potatoes are browned.
3. Add beaten eggs to the vegetable mixture. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes over medium heat. Stir off and on until there is no liquid.
4. Stir in the garlic powder and pepper.
5. Make each burrito by placing 2 tablespoons of cheese and 1/2 cup of the egg mixture on the tortilla and rolling up. Serve or freeze.

Nutrition information per serving: 270 calories, 9 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 31 g carbohydrates, 14 g protein, 190 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 2 g fiber

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more recipes, information, and videos, visit http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/.

Reconsidering the Egg

dv1897034Experts have warned against diets high in cholesterol for years and have suggested, for example, limiting egg yolk intake. The previous Dietary Guidelines for Americans* stated that Americans eat too much cholesterol and that high-cholesterol foods like eggs should be limited. Preliminary reports, however, indicate that the 2015 guidelines may no longer consider cholesterol as a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.

New research suggests that dietary cholesterol intake may not significantly increase blood cholesterol levels or increase the risk of heart disease in healthy adults. Saturated fat and trans fat in the diet are of greater concern for keeping blood cholesterol levels down than the actual cholesterol content of food. However, it is still recommended that we consume limited amounts of foods high in saturated fat or trans fat (e.g., butter, margarine, fats in meat, and high-fat dairy).

Eggs are an inexpensive protein food that is relatively low in total fat and saturated fat and rich in vitamins and minerals. Therefore, eggs can be part of a healthy diet. It is still recommended to eat them in moderation and prepare them with low-fat cooking methods like boiling or poaching.

*The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated every five years by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services. They provide dietary and physical activity recommendations for Americans ages two years and over to reduce risk of chronic disease and promote overall health.

Sources: http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015.asp; http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/dietaryguidelines/

Scrambled Egg Muffins

ScrambledEggMuffinsServes: 6 (Serving size: 1 muffin)

Ingredients
• 2 cups washed vegetables, diced (e.g. broccoli, peppers, onion, mushrooms, tomatoes, or spinach)
• 6 eggs
• 1/4 teaspoon salt
• 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
• 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
• 1/2 cup low fat cheddar cheese, shredded

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray muffin tin with nonstick spray.
2. Add chopped veggies to the muffin tin.
3. Beat eggs in a bowl. Stir in salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
4. Pour eggs into the muffin tin and bake 20-25 minutes. To add cheese, remove the tin from the oven during the last 3 minutes of baking. Sprinkle the cheese on top of the muffins and return the tin to the oven.
5. Bake until the internal temperature reaches 160°F or a knife inserted near the center comes out clean.

Meal Idea: Serve extras in tortillas or with a green salad and roll.

Nutritional information per serving
100 calories, 6 g total fat (2 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 215 mg cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 3 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 1 g sugar, 9 g protein

Source: Spend Smart Eat Smart http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/

Spring: An Egg-citing Time of Year!

eggs easter color dyeCooking, coloring, hiding, and eating eggs are a sign of the season. Follow these easy tips to ensure the safety of the eggs.

1. Use eggs that have been properly stored in the refrigerator and are not past their “use by date.” Uncooked eggs can be stored three to five weeks in the refrigerator.

2. To hard cook eggs, put eggs in a single layer in a pan; completely cover all eggs with cold water. Cover the pan and bring the water to a boiling point; then turn off the heat, and leave pan on the burner for 15-17 minutes. Cool under cold running water to stop the cooking process.

3. Refrigerate hard-cooked eggs in their cartons if you won’t be coloring them right after cooking and cooling. Refrigerate the eggs again right after you dye them. Cooked eggs can be safely stored in the refrigerator for one week.

4. Everyone who helps dye the eggs should wash his/her hands thoroughly (before and after handling eggs).

5. Eggs should not be left at room temperature for more than two hours if they will be eaten. If they will be hidden in an egg hunt or used as a centerpiece, they should be thrown away
after use.

6. Color only uncracked eggs. If you plan to eat your dyed eggs later, use food coloring or specially made food-grade egg dyes dissolved in water that is warmer than the eggs. If any eggs crack during dyeing or while on display, throw them away along with any eggs that have been out of refrigeration for more than 2 hours.

For more information contact ISU Extension and Outreach Answerline 800-262-3804 or email questions to answer@iastate.edu

Eggs Provide ‘Egg’cellent Nutrition

Egg in shellIt was once believed that limiting your egg intake was an important step in eating a heart healthy diet. After all, one egg yolk provides 215 milligrams of cholesterol (recommended intake is less than 300 milligrams daily). This myth is slowly being dispelled, however, with the release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Supported by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, the guidelines are a set of recommendations based on current scientific evidence. They are intended to promote health, lower the risk of chronic disease, and decrease the incidence of overweight and obesity through better nutrition practices and physical activity. The 2010 guidelines state there is no evidence to suggest that eating one egg daily increases blood cholesterol or the risk of heart disease in healthy people. Eggs are an inexpensive, but excellent source of protein, vitamins, and minerals.

A Dozen Egg Safety Tips

Eggs made news earlier this year because of a salmonella outbreak. Properly handling and storing eggs will reduce the risk of contaminating eggs with salmonella. Salmonella infection is often the result of eating raw or undercooked eggs or egg products, meat, or poultry. It can take from several hours to about two days to cause symptoms. Following is a list of possible signs and symptoms of salmonella infection:Carton of eggs

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Muscle pains
  • Blood in the stool

There are many ways to make sure eggs are safe to eat. Use the following tips:

  1. Buy eggs only if sold from a refrigerator or refrigerated case at 45°F.
  2. Store eggs in their original carton on a shelf in the refrigerator (not in the door) and use them within 3 weeks for best quality.
  3. Wash hands, utensils, equipment, and work surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after they come in contact with eggs and egg-containing foods.
  4. Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
  5. Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160°F (72°C). Use a food thermometer to be sure.
  6. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served—Caesar salad dressing and homemade ice cream are two examples— use pasteurized egg products.
  7. Avoid taste-testing egg-containing foods before they are thoroughly cooked.
  8. For buffet-style serving, hot egg dishes should be kept hot, and cold egg dishes kept cold.
  9. Cooked eggs, including hard-boiled eggs, and egg-containing foods should not sit out for more than 2 hours. Within 2 hours either reheat or refrigerate.
  10. Use hard-cooked eggs (in the shell or peeled) within 1 week after cooking.
  11. Refrigerate leftover cooked egg dishes and use within 3 to 4 days. When refrigerating a large amount of a hot egg-containing leftover, divide it into several shallow containers so it will cool quickly.
  12. Cooked eggs for a picnic should be packed in an insulated cooler with enough ice or frozen gel packs to keep them cold. Don’t put the cooler in the trunk— carry it in the air-conditioned passenger compartment of the car.

Source: Retrieved from “Playing It Safe With Eggs”

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