Any Movement Is Better Than No Movement!

Crunched for time? Any workout is better than no workout! It is recommended adults get at least 150 minutes of cardio training (i.e., walking, biking, swimming) a week and at least two days of muscle-strengthening activities (i.e., weight training) to promote living a healthy lifestyle. Working out and getting the blood pumping has many health benefits—including reducing the risk of chronic diseases, improving sleep, enhancing mood, relieving stress—and it can be fun! At-home circuit workouts, biking, walking, gardening, jogging, and bodyweight exercises (strength-training exercises that use your own body weight to provide resistance against gravity) are some easy ways to incorporate extra movement into your busy day. To reach the goal of 150 minutes per week, spread out your workouts into 30 minutes a day and bring a family member or friend along too!

Visit Spend Smart. Eat Smart. (spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu/move-your-way-activity-planner) to find more ideas to increase your daily activity.

Make Waves for Your Health’s Sake

Swimming sign

As adults, we need two and a half hours (150 minutes) of aerobic physical activity per week. Swimming is the fourth most popular sports activity in the United States. While you’re trying to cool off this summer, try to incorporate some water exercises.

When you hop in the water—whether a lake, river, or pool—try one of these “cool” exercises:

  • Walk forward, backward, and sideways in the water. Start slowly for 1–2 minutes in each direction and work up to 3–5 minutes. A water belt may be helpful to maintain buoyancy.
  • Water squats are a great strength exercise. Be sure your feet are on the bottom of the pool, lake, or river and you can wiggle your toes. Do two sets of 10 repetitions.
  • Grab a water noodle and use it as an oar. Begin to row as if you were in a boat, using the noodle as your oar in the water. Do two sets of 10 repetitions.

Sources:
Centers for Disease Control
Unity Point

Get Your Family Moving!

You probably know that regular physical activity helps both parents and children stay well. It strengthens the heart, muscles, and bones. But did you know that physical activity could strengthen families, too? Families that take walks, play sports, or do physically active chores together often notice these benefits: better communication and bonding, less stress and conflict, and more family fun!

Getting family members of all ages involved in the same physical activity at one time can be a challenge. Here are tips that may help:Sports equipment

  • Set regular, specific activity times. Determine times when the whole family is available.
  • Plan and track progress. Write plans on a family calendar.
  • Build new skills. Enroll yourself and the kids in exercise classes you will both enjoy.
  • Treat physical activity as a gift. Give presents that encourage physical activity, such as bikes, balls, jump ropes, and badminton sets.

Both parents and children can treasure the times when the family is physically active together. Visit Choose MyPlate’s Ten Tips to Be an Active Family for additional information.

Sources: ChooseMyPlate.gov, WebMD

Take a Time Out for Flexibility

While watching your favorite teams compete in March Madness, take a time out during commercial breaks to stretch. Flexibility is an overlooked component of exercise that improves your range of motion, which increases your ability to engage in all different types of physical activity. You do not need to go to yoga to improve your flexibility. The most recent physical activity recommendations suggest stretching as an easy and effective means to increase flexibility.

Follow these simple stretching tips to minimize injury and maximize flexibility benefits:

  • Relax by taking a few deep breaths during stretches.
  • Make smooth/slow movements instead of jerky/quick motions.
  • Stretch until feeling a gentle pull; if you feel any sharp pain or discomfort, you have stretched too far.
  • Hold stretches for a total of 15–30 seconds.

To get started, try these simple stretches as you wait for the basketball games to resume:

  • Forward Bend—When sitting/standing, reach your hands toward your toes. Hold for 15–30 seconds.
  • Wall Push—Stand 12–18 inches away from a wall; lean forward, pushing against the wall with your hands and keeping heels flat on the floor. Hold for 15 seconds; repeat 1–2 times.
  • Hip Flexor Stretch—With both knees on the floor, bring one leg forward placing your foot flat on the floor and your knee at a 90-degree angle. Push your hips forward until you feel a stretch in your front thigh, near the groin. Keep your torso upright and front knee behind your toes. Hold for 20-30 seconds on each leg.

Visit the American Heart Association for more stretches.

 

Sources: American Heart Association, Stretches for exercise and flexibility; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Active adults. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

Did Your Exercise Goals Take a Holiday?

Goal

The holiday season is a busy time of year, which may make it hard to get in the recommended 30 minutes of moderate physical activity five days a week. Even when these recommendations are met, there is an increased risk for chronic disease when you are sitting for a prolonged period of time. There are plenty of ways to get moving, though. For instance, take the stairs instead of the elevator, walk the hallways at work on breaks, stand while you’re on the phone, or stretch a couple minutes for every hour of prolonged sitting. At home, complete floor exercises during commercial breaks or march in place while you’re cooking in the kitchen. These are small steps to reduce sedentary time and increase activity.

You can even enjoy the winter weather while getting in some exercise. Activities like ice skating, snowball fights, sledding, and making snow angels count toward your daily physical activity minutes.

Source: eatright.org

Let’s Deskercise!

Do you sit at a desk for prolonged periods during the day? If so, try deskercising to reduce the harmful effects of sitting for long periods of time. Deskercise includes 20 short bouts of cardiovascular, strength, and stretching exercises that can be performed at your desk throughout the day. To download a free poster—Deskercise! 20 Ways to Get Moving While You Work—from The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD).

Other ways to get moving at work include the following:Less Sitting More Walking

  • Take a quick walk around the office every time you need a refill of coffee or water.
  • Instead of emailing your coworker a few offices down, get up and go converse in person.
  • Pace while on long conference calls.
  • Have a walking/pushing meeting.
  • Take the long route to the restroom.
  • Swap your office chair for a stability ball.

 

Source: Desker-what?, NCHPAD

Cardio Pyramid

The Cardio Pyramid, created by Colorado State University, is a fun, upbeat workout that you can do at home. Instructional videos are available that break down each move in the pyramid, including warm-up and strength-building exercises, into simple steps so that you can learn the proper form necessary to complete each move.

To do the Cardio Pyramid, do the exercises in this order:

  • March in place, 2 counts of 8
  • Step touch, 2 counts of 8
  • Hamstring curls, 2 counts of 8
  • V-step, 2 counts of 8
  • High knees, 2 counts of 8
  • March in place, 3 counts of 8

Then repeat the exercises in the opposite order. To access the instructional videos to learn how to do each exercise, go to this eating smart being active website.

Checklist for Selecting an Eating Plan

The claims sound believable, so it can be tempting to try the latest diet you hear about. While a diet plan may sound tempting, an eating plan should be the goal. To manage your weight and maintain a healthy nutritional status, it would be wise to consider these questions:

exercise imageQUESTION: Does the plan promise weight loss without exercise?

For most healthy adults, the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends the following exercise guidelines:

  • Aerobic activity – Get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity.
  • Muscle-strengthening exercises – Two or more days per week.

Keep activity exciting by doing different things you enjoy.

 

food imageQUESTION: Are there particular foods, or food groups, excluded or consumed excessively?

Use MyPlate (www.choosemyplate.gov) to guide your food intake. All food groups are important.

 

apple imageQUESTION: Does the plan require you to purchase pills, bars, or shakes?

A sustainable eating pattern is based on food readily available in grocery stores and farmers markets.

 

scale imageQUESTION: Does the plan promise weight loss of more than 1–2 pounds per week?

Losing 1–2 pounds or less a week is gradual, healthy weight loss. Weight lost more rapidly than this tends to be regained even faster.

 

person imageQUESTION: Does the plan sound too good to be true?

If it does, it probably is.

Physical Fitness without the Fees

Woman exercising

Strength training is just as important as aerobic exercise. Luckily, you don’t need to buy expensive fitness equipment or gym memberships. Here are some no-cost ways to increase your strength:

  • Lift can or bottle weights. You can use unopened soup cans from your cupboard, or plastic milk, water, or detergent jugs filled with water or sand.
  • Scoot on paper plates. Doing lunges on paper plates placed on a carpet helps sculpt the body.
  • Do push-ups. Push-ups can be done anywhere, anytime. It’s helpful for beginners to use counter tops for assistance by placing both hands on the counter and placing the feet behind from an angle.
  • Use old pantyhose as resistance bands. Anything you can do with resistance bands you can do with pantyhose (squats, curls, and other moves).
  • Conquer the stairs. Skip escalators and elevators whenever you can. Stair climbing strengthens the legs and exercises the heart.

Visit www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/videos/ for how-to videos on muscle-strengthening exercises you can do at home.

Source: Move It Monday

Why Is It So Hard to Exercise?

 

Anyone can have a difficult time making exercise part of their routine. Often it comes down to motivation! Try these tricks to reach your fitness goals:

  • Become an early bird. Many individuals get in their workouts in the morning, when willpower is at a maximum level and before it dwindles throughout the day.Alarm clock
  • Get other people involved. Think of kid- friendly activities that your children will enjoy with you or find a friend who likes the same things you do, like running or spinning.
  • Set smaller goals. It is much easier to fit ten minutes of movement into your day every few hours than to find a larger chunk of time in your schedule. Take one bag of groceries in at a time from the car, do sets of 10 squats or push-ups in between loads of laundry, or take stairs two at a time to get your heart rate up.
  • Keep equipment front and center. Sometimes a simple thing, like putting your workout gear in your living room, can be key to feeling more motivated.

Source: webmd

 

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