Hot Dogs and Food Safety

Hot dogs

The same general food safety guidelines apply to hot dogs as to all perishable foods: keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. When you buy hot dogs, refrigerate or freeze them promptly. Never leave hot dogs at room temperature for more than 2 hours or 1 hour if it is 90 degrees or higher.

Although hot dogs are fully cooked, those at higher risk for foodborne illness—including pregnant women, preschoolers, older adults, and anyone with a weakened immune system—should reheat hot dogs until steaming hot because of the risk of listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes, the bacteria that causes listeriosis, may also be found in other foods like luncheon meat, cold cuts, soft cheese, and unpasteurized milk. Symptoms may include fever, chills, headaches, backache, upset stomach, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. It may also cause miscarriages. Call your health care provider if you have any of these symptoms. If you have Listeriosis, your provider can treat you.

Source: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA

Feeling Queasy? Call, It’s Easy!

 

To get more peoplGerms in mouthe to report foodborne illness or “food poisoning,” the Iowa Department of Public Health recently launched the IowaSic Hotline. Now when you think you ate something that made you sick, you can call 1-844-IowaSic or 1-844-469-2742. A trained specialist will ask you about your symptoms and all the foods you ate recently. If your illness seems related to a food you bought, the Iowa Food and Consumer Safety Bureau will investigate.

By calling IowaSic, you may save others from the misery of foodborne illness—and worse. A food “bug” that makes you only queasy could possibly kill other, more vulnerable people, such as young children and the elderly.

To find out more on what to do if you think you have a foodborne illness, watch this video.

 

Source: Food Safety News

Mail Order Food Safety

Convenience means different things to different people; to many it means saving time. Food delivered by mail is a popular, convenient gift idea. Because ordering food through the mail may cause concern about food safety, it’s imperative to develop some mental checklists for how both food and packaging should look when it arrives.mail order food This is especially true for perishable foods that must be handled in a timely manner to prevent foodborne illness.

The following will help determine if the foods have been handled properly.

  • Make sure the company meets state or federal requirements for mail delivery.
  • Make sure the company sends perishable foods with a cold source, such as dry ice.
  • Make sure perishable items and the outer package are labeled “Keep Refrigerated” to alert the recipient. Food should be delivered as quickly as possible – ideally, overnight.
  • Open packaged food marked “Keep Refrigerated” immediately and check temperature of items:
    • The food should arrive frozen or with ice crystals still visible or refrigerator cold—below 41°F as measured with a calibrated food thermometer.
    • Even if a product is smoked, cured, vacuum-packed, and/or fully cooked, it still is a perishable product and must be kept cold.
    • If perishable food arrives warm — above 41°F, notify the company. Do not consume the food. Do not even taste suspect food. Responsible companies will reimburse you or send another package.
  • Don’t have perishable items delivered to an office unless you know it will arrive on a work day and there is refrigerator space available to keep it cold.

If mail order foods arrive in a questionable condition, the following organizations can provide help.

  • USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline, weekdays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CT (1-888-674-6854) (meat, poultry, and egg products)
  • FDA Outreach and Information Center 1-888-723-3366 weekdays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CT (any foods other than meat, poultry, and egg products)

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