Milk Myths Busted!

pitcher and glass milk drinks dairyJune is Dairy Month — a good time to consider the benefits of drinking milk and eating other dairy foods for calcium and Vitamin D. Drinking milk increases bone health, reduces risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and blood pressure. Despite these benefits, some milk myths prevent some people from drinking milk. Our ISU Extension and Outreach myth busters have “busted” a few of these myths below.

Milk Myth 1: Milk causes mucus
Myth Buster: For some, drinking milk may make mucus thicker than it is normally. However drinking milk for most people does not make your body produce more phlegm and will not worsen a cold.

Milk Myth 2: Organic milk is much healthier than conventional milk
Myth Buster: Cup for cup, organic and conventionally-produced milk contain the same nine essential nutrients such as calcium, vitamin D, and potassium. Both conventionally-produced and organic milk are routinely tested for antibiotics and pesticides and must comply with very stringent safety standards, ensuring that both organic milk and conventional milk are pure, safe, and nutritious.

Milk Myth 3: Fat-free milk has almost no nutritional value.
Myth Buster: Fat-free milk has the same amount of calcium, vitamin D, and protein as whole, 2%, and 1% milk. The only nutritional difference among the varieties of milk is the amount of fat and calories per serving. Another difference is that fat-free milk is often cheaper than the other varieties. A family of four changing from whole milk to fat-free milk could save $8 to $11 per week and shave off 5,040 calories and 518
grams of fat!

Handwashing 101

handwashingHandwashing is one of the most effective means to reduce the spread of infectious disease. It also helps protect against food borne illness outbreaks. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately half of all food borne illness outbreaks is due to people not washing their hands properly.

A recent study at Michigan State University found that only 5 percent of people (consumers, not food service workers) in a college town using restrooms properly washed their hands. The study observed over 3,000 people after they had gone to the restroom and discovered that about 10 percent (384 people) skipped washing their hands all together and about one-third (33%) did not use soap. Of those who did wash their hands, the average time spent doing so was about six seconds. The recommended time by the CDC is 15 seconds.

To properly wash your hands follow these steps:

  1. Wet hands to help loosen dirt, oil, and germs.
  2. Apply soap, preferably antibacterial, to remove the dirt, oil, and germs from hands.
  3. Rub your hands together for 15 to 20 seconds to make sure all parts of both hands are washed. Don’t forget about cleaning around your fingernails, which
  4. are ideal for trapping dirt and germs.
  5. Rinse off all the soap and loosened dirt from the hands under running water.
  6. Dry your hands with a clean, dry towel or by using a hand dryer.

For more information on safe handwashing look at the ISU Extension and Outreach “5 Myths of Handwashing” publication.

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