Oatmeal: It’s a Keeper!

 

Jar of oats

Hot cereals, such as oatmeal, are money-saving breakfast foods. Not only do they cost much less than cold breakfast cereals, but they also keep longer on the shelf. A box of oat ring cereal, for example, has a shelf life of 6–8 months. A box of oatmeal can last up to three years! This means that if you’re an oatmeal fan, you can buy it in bulk and not have to worry about it “going bad.”

To ensure the longest shelf life for all cereals, keep them in airtight containers in a cool, dry place where the temperature remains stable. Changes in temperature can cause moisture to condense from the air inside packages. Moisture can cause mold to grow. A dense box of whole grains generally lasts longer than a box of cereal rings, flakes, or puffs because it contains less air.

For more tips on safely storing grains and other dry foods, visit the website www.eatbydate.com/grains/.

Overnight Oats

Overnight Oatmeal

When it comes to a quick and healthy breakfast, a jar of “overnight oats” is a great option. This popular instant meal is convenient, nutritious, and delicious. You simply mix raw oats with yogurt and fruit in a jar or other container, and then refrigerate it overnight.

The benefits are plentiful.

  • It’s a whole meal. One serving provides you with food from three of the five MyPlate food groups.
  • It’s satisfying. The fiber in the oats and fruit makes you feel fuller longer.
  • It saves time. It takes two minutes to prepare overnight oats the night before and no time at all in the morning to grab a healthy breakfast.
  • It’s versatile. Overnight oats have limitless flavor possibilities. Ingredients can range from berries and chocolate to peanut butter and bananas. Your oats will never have to become boring.
  • It’s a whole grain. We should eat at least three servings of whole grains daily to reduce our risk of heart disease, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer.

To learn about more tasty ways to incorporate whole grains into your diet, visit the Extension Store.

Source: Michigan State University Extension

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