Fall Home Food Preservation

Apples, winter squash, and pumpkin may still be on your home food preservation to-do list.

Jar of canned vegetables
  • Always use tested recipes and procedures. Use publications from the National Center for Home Food Preservation, nchfp.uga.edu/,and ISU Extension and Outreach’s Preserve the Taste of Summer, store.extension.iastate.edu/.
  • Canning apple pie filling requires Clear-Jel. This is the only thickener that holds up to canning. It is not available in stores but you can purchase it online. Do not substitute Instant Clear-Jel or any other thickener for home-canned pie filling.
  • You can pressure-can squash and pumpkin safely if you cut them in cubes. However, you cannot safely puree squash and pumpkin. The density of the pureed squash/pumpkin can prevent adequate heat processing, even in a pressure canner.
  • There are no tested recipes for home-canned pumpkin butter. You can freeze pumpkin butter or store it in the refrigerator.

Butternut Squash Enchiladas

butternut-squash-enchiladasServing Size: 1 enchilada | Serves: 8

Ingredients:
•2 1/2 cups butternut squash (or other winter squash), cooked
•1 can (15 ounces) black beans (drained and rinsed)
•1/2 cup onion, diced (1/2 medium onion)
•1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped, or 3 tbsp. dried cilantro
•2 tsp. garlic powder
•1/2 tsp. cumin
•1 cup 2% fat cheese, shredded (like cheddar or Mexican blend), divided
•8 tortillas (6”)
•1 cup salsa or 1 can (10 ounces) red or green enchilada sauce
•1/2 cup Greek yogurt

Instructions:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
2. Mix the squash, beans, onion, cilantro, garlic powder, and cumin in a bowl.
3. Mix 3/4 cup of the cheese into the squash mixture.
4. Put a 1/2 cup strip of filling on each tortilla. Roll the tortilla around the filling. Put the tortilla into a greased 9” x 13” baking dish with the seam down.
5. Cover the tortillas with the salsa or enchilada sauce. Put the rest of the cheese (1/4 cup) on the salsa or sauce.
6. Bake for 25 minutes.
7. Serve each enchilada with 1 tablespoon of Greek yogurt.

Nutrition information per serving: 220 calories, 3.5g total fat, 1.5g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 5mg cholesterol, 660mg sodium, 35g total carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 7g sugar, 10g protein

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more recipes, information, and videos, visit www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/.

Harvest and Store Vegetables at Peak Quality

squashHarvesting vegetables at the right stage of maturity results in nutritious, high quality products. You can capture the peak flavors of vegetables by harvesting and storing them under optimal conditions.

Find detailed information for storing more than 30 types of garden vegetables, including winter squash, in Harvesting and Storing Vegetables. This handout also includes recommended storage temperatures, relative humidity, storage life for fresh vegetables, suggested methods for extended preservation, and types of storage facilities.

Unlike its summer counterparts, winter squash is harvested at a mature age, which makes the skin hard and inedible. The skin, however, is protective and increases the storage life.

Winter squash can be stored for three months or longer. The yellow and orange colored flesh of winter squash tends to be more nutritious and richer in vitamins, such as beta-carotene, than summer squash. Winter squash is always served cooked and, because of the tough skin, only the inner flesh is eaten.

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