Scrambled Egg Skillet

Serving Size: 1 1/3 cups | Serves: 3

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon oil (canola, olive, vegetable)
  • 1 1/2 cups yellow or red potato, diced
  • 3/4 cup bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup onion, diced
  • 6 eggs, beaten
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Optional: chopped avocado, chopped herbs, hot sauce, ketchup, salsa, shredded cheese, sour cream

Directions:

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  2. Add potatoes to skillet. Sauté for12 minutes, stirring every 2 to 3 minutes.
  3. Add peppers and onions. Sauté 4 to 5 minutes or until potatoes are cooked through.
  4. Reduce heat to medium low. Pour eggs over vegetables. Stir in salt and pepper.
  5. Gently stir the eggs into the vegetables. Cook and stir until eggs are set and no liquid remains in the pan.
  6. Top with optional ingredients.

Nutrition information per serving:
200 calories, 1.0g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 450mg sodium, 39g total carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 9g sugar, 12g protein.

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu

Slow Cooker Black-eyed Pea Soup

Serving Size: 1 1/2 cups | Serves: 5

Woman peeling a carrot

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound dried black-eyed peas
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 6 carrots, chopped
  • 2 ribs celery, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon seasoning (basil, dried oregano, rosemary, or sage)

Directions:

  1. Rinse and sort dry black-eyed peas to remove any dirt or debris.
  2. Place all the ingredients in the slow cooker and mix.
  3. Cook on low for 8 hours.

Nutrition information per serving:
200 calories, 1.0g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 450mg sodium, 39g total carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 9g sugar, 12g protein.

This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu

Slow Cooker: Your Best Friend for Plant-based Meals

Slow cookers are popular and an easy dinner option. Slow cooking is exactly what it sounds like—a process of cooking slowly. Using a slow cooker can retain some of the nutrients typically lost when frying or boiling.

Plant-based slow cooker meals focus on foods primarily from plants. This includes not only fruits and vegetables, but also nuts, seeds, oils, whole grains, legumes, and beans. Plant-based meals are a great way to focus on choosing foods from plant sources, but that doesn’t mean you have to stop eating meat and dairy.

Research has shown plant-based diets reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers (specifically colon, breast, and prostate cancer), depression, and a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function.

Here are a few tips to get started with a plant-based slow cooker meal:

  • Add a whole grain with root vegetables, like potatoes and turnips, for soups and stews.
  • Try dry beans for soups and stews.
  • Layer vegetables, starches, and sauces for a casserole-style meal.
  • Use a variety of herbs and spices to add flavor.

Enjoy a nutritious and delicious plant-based recipe perfect for slow cooking at Spend Smart. Eat Smart., go.iastate.edu/FR22GX.

Source: Harvard School of Public Health, go.iastate.edu/OYSCUO

Roasted Vegetables and Kielbasa

Serving Size: 1 1/2 cups | Serves: 4

Plate with roasted vegetables and kielbasa, fruit, roll, drink

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups chopped vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, onions, peppers, potatoes, zucchini)
  • 1 tablespoon oil (canola, olive, vegetable)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 turkey kielbasa (13 ounces)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. In a large bowl, stir together chopped vegetables, oil, ground black pepper.
  3. Cut kielbasa into round pieces 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick.
  4. Stir kielbasa into vegetables.
  5. Spray baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Spread vegetables & kielbasa evenly over baking sheet.
  6. Bake for 15 minutes. Stir.
  7. Bake for up to 25 minutes more, stirring every 5 to 10 minutes, until vegetables are soft. Cooking time depends on size of vegetable pieces.

Nutrition information per serving:
250 calories, 12g total fat, 3g saturated fat, 710mg sodium, 22g carbohydrates, 4g dietary fiber, 15g protein. This recipe is courtesy of ISU Extension and Outreach’s Spend Smart. Eat Smart. website. For more information, recipes, and videos, visit Spend Smart. Eat Smart., spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu.

Pork Loin Roast and Vegetables

Serving Size: 3 oz. meat and 1 cup of vegetables | Serves: 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups onion, cut in wedges
  • 2 cups potatoes, diced
  • 2 cups baby carrots or 3/4 pound regular carrots, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons oil (canola or vegetable)
  • 1/4 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 1/4 pound pork loin
  • For Rub: 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/2teaspoon garlic powder, 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF.
  2. Mix vegetables with 1 tablespoon oil, salt, and black pepper in a bowl.
  3. Lay vegetables around edge of 9”x13”pan. Put in oven.
  4. Using a small bowl, mix the brown sugar, garlic powder, ground black pepper, and salt in the bowl.
  5. Sprinkle the mixture over the loin. Press gently so it sticks to the roast. Wash your hands.
  6. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet over medium high heat. Add the loin. Brown the sides of meat. Cook about 2–3 minutes per side.
  7. Transfer the pork to the center of the pan with vegetables. Bake for about 40 minutes. Check the temperature after 30 minutes in the oven.
  8. Remove from oven when meat thermometer reads 145ºF. Let set for 5minutes. Slice and serve.

Nutrition information per serving: 240 calories, 8g total fat, 1.5g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 55mg cholesterol, 310mg sodium, 19g total carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 7g sugar, 22g protein.

How to Create a Container Garden

Is your garden limited on space? Consider growing your vegetables in containers! Container gardening occurs when plants are grown in containers such as pots rather than in the ground. This method reduces potential problems with infertile garden sites and “free-living” bacteria such as nematodes.

Tomatoes growing in container
  • Containers. Almost any type of container can be used as long as it has drainage holes in the bottom. Common containers include plastic, clay, ceramic, or wood. Check out this resource, store.extension.iastate.edu/product/4179, for more information on size of containers recommended for various vegetables and the amount of potting mix.
  • Growing mixes. Select quality mixes that are free of plant disease organisms and weed seeds, are less likely to compact, drain well, are lightweight, and hold moisture and nutrients. Soiless potting mixes can be purchased from garden centers and retail outlets and can be prepared with fertilizer included.
  • Summer care of container gardens.
    • Location. Vegetables grow best in full sunlight. Plants that bear fruit require at least 6 hours of direct sunlight per day. Leafy vegetables tolerate more shade.
    • Watering. Plants grown in containers require more frequent watering because they dry out from the sun and wind. Never allow the soil to completely dry out between waterings. Overwatering will also kill plants. Avoid wetting leaves when watering to prevent the development of plant diseases.
    • Fertilization. A soluble fertilizer (15-30-15 or 20-20-20) applied once every week is recommended. If using a commercial potting mix, it may not be necessary to begin fertilization until midsummer.

Summer Bounty Salad

Vegetables

Serving Size: 1 cup | Serves: 8

Ingredients:

7 cups vegetables (zucchini, broccoli, carrots, radishes, green onions)
1 pepper (green, red, or yellow)
2 tomatoes (red, yellow, or mixed)
2/3 cup light or fat free salad dressing

Directions:

  1. Wash and prepare the vegetables as follows:
    • Cut broccoli into florets.
    • Chop zucchini, carrots, radishes, and green onions.
    • Slice pepper (1 to 1 1/2 cups)
    • Chop tomatoes.
  2. Combine vegetables and salad dressing in a bowl, stirring to coat vegetables with dressing.
  3. Cover and refrigerate 1–3 hours to blend flavors. Store any leftovers in refrigerator and use within 3 days.

Tip:
We have a video for you! Make Summer Bounty Salad, go.iastate.edu/HLKNNF. This is a recipe, go.iastate.edu/ZYRU63, that is easy, delicious, and perfect for this time of year.

Nutrition information per serving:
60 calories, 1.5g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 220mg sodium, 10g total carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 6g sugar, 2g protein

Produce Basics

Preparing fresh produce is easy if you have the right information! Spend Smart. Eat Smart Produce Basics, go.iastate.edu/EXKVVD, describes how to store, clean, and prepare fresh produce.

  • Corn on the Cob, go.iastate.edu/UIOFP4: A summer staple that is high in fiber.
    • Choose ears of corn that have a bright green husk.
    • If husk is removed, refrigerate in tightly wrapped plastic for 1 to 2 days. If husk is still on, store uncovered in a refrigerator for 1 to 2 days.
  • Onions: This vegetable is high in vitamin C and fiber.
    • Choose onions that are dry, shiny, and firm, and do not have dents or bruises.
    • Store whole onions in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place and use within 4 weeks.
    • Refrigerate cut onions in a tightly sealed container and use within 7 days.
    • Rinse onions under cool running water before use.
  • Zucchini, go.iastate.edu/ZAC1CS: This food helps heal cuts and wounds while helping the immune system.
    • Choose zucchini that have shiny skins and firm flesh.
    • Store in a plastic bag in the vegetable (crisper) drawer of the refrigerator and use within 4–5 days.

Grilled Vegetable Packets

Serving Size: 3/4 cup | Serves: 5

Ingredients:

  • 2 zucchini, small (sliced)
  • 2 yellow squash, small (sliced)
  • 4 red potatoes, small (scrubbed well and sliced)
  • 1/2 red onion (sliced)
  • 1/2 bell pepper (red or green, seeded and sliced)
  • 1/4 cup Italian salad dressing, light
  • salt and pepper (optional, to taste)

Directions:

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Heat grill to medium heat or 350°F.
  3. Wash vegetables and slice.
  4. Toss in a large bowl. Add dressing and toss until vegetables are coated.
  5. Tear 2 large squares of aluminum foil and place half of the vegetable mixture on each piece. Place an equal piece of foil over the top of the vegetable mixture and fold bottom piece with top sheet to form a packet.
  6. Place on heated grill for 20–30 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. If you don’t have a grill, bake Veggie Packets in the oven at 400°F for 20–30 minutes.
  7. Before you open the packets, poke holes in the foil with a fork. Be careful opening the foil because the steam will be very hot and could burn you!
  8. Empty vegetables onto serving plate or serve from foil packets.

Nutrition information per serving:
133 calories, 0g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 144mg sodium, 29g total carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 5g sugar, 4g protein. This recipe is courtesy of MyPlate website, USDA MyPlate Recipes, www.myplate.gov/myplate-kitchen/recipes.

Get Fired Up! Grill What’s in Season

Vegetable kabobs on grill

Warm weather is a wonderful time to fire up the grill. From asparagus to early zucchini or grilled chicken with mushrooms, onions, and peppers, using your grill to make the most of the summer crop of vegetables adds a variety of colors to summer meals! Did you know that there are several different ways to grill perfect vegetables? Check out the tips below!

  • Directly on the grill. On a gas grill, preheat the grill to medium heat, about 375°F. Marinate your veggies or season them with your favorite spices and lightly drizzle with olive oil. Put your seasoned vegetables on the grill in a single layer, placing the ones that take the longest to cook in the back of the grill. Close the lid and let the vegetables cook for ~20 minutes. After 10 minutes, open the lid and flip the vegetables until done to your liking.
  • Kabobs. A kabob is made by skewering pieces of meat and/or vegetables and then grilling them. Grilling kabobs is a great way to grill a bunch of vegetables together! Toss vegetables in desired sauce and seasonings. If using wooden skewers, soak them in water for 30 minutes before threading on the vegetables to avoid burning. Combine vegetables with similar cooking times onto skewers (peppers, onions, zucchini, tomatoes). Place skewers on the grill over medium heat. Grill for 20 minutes or until you can easily stick a fork through the vegetable.
  • Foil packets. This way of grilling requires no pots and pans to scrub! To create foil packets, place ingredients in the center of the foil and tightly seal the packet to trap the steam inside. You can serve the packets directly from the grill or stack them in the refrigerator until you are ready to use. Check out this month’s recipe!
  • Grill basket. Using this method is similar to a foil packet but easier. A grill basket is a wire container made out of large-weave mesh. You can use it to hold food while cooking on a grill. For more information, check out this Iowa State University Extension article on Grilling those summer veggies, blogs.extension.iastate.edu/answerline.
  • Questions about grill safety? Read Safe Summertime Grilling, blogs.extension.iastate.edu/answerline.

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